T Is for Trespass (Export Edition; Not for sale in U.S)

T Is for Trespass (Export Edition; Not for sale in U.S)

by Sue Grafton
4.1 141

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T Is for Trespass (Kinsey Millhone Series #20) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 141 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1987 in Santa Teresa, California abrasive octogenarian Gus Vronsky suffers a shoulder separation from a fall that he cannot get up from. His next door neighbor private investigator Kinsey Millhone and her eighty-seven years old landlord Henry hear a wail. They investigate, find Gus debilitated, call 911 and care for him until his great-niece hires nursing home aide, Solana Rojas.--------- However, Millhone becomes concerned that the care-giver is mistreating her patient. She plans to intervene if she can find proof. Unbeknownst to Millhone (ironically the reader knows on page one) is that a diabolical thug has stolen the real Rojas¿ identity and knows who she must remain vigilant against with if she is to continue with her masquerade.--------- Although the ending violently rights things, this Millhone tale is T for terrific. The story line is action-packed as Millhone wants to do the right thing for her neighbor, but finds her interference not welcomed. The fake Rojas proves a clever adversary at they play a deadly game of chess in which Gus could prove the victim. Fans of the long running series will enjoy this entry as the normally confident heroine struggles with how much involvement is acceptable.------
PattiBascomb More than 1 year ago
Kinsey Millhone, the prickly star of Sue Grafton's California based alphabet series, is no slouch detective. So, when Millhone does a cursory background check on a home health aide and unwittingly places an elderly neighbor in harm's way, she feels obligated to undo the damage. The problem is that no one, especially not the neighbor's reluctant relative who hired her, wants to be bothered with the inconvenient truth. The villain in "T is for Trespass," an evil psychopath, is one of the best that Grafton has written. I found myself gripping the pages and worrying that Millhone might not survive this one. As is true in all the Grafton books, more than one case is being investigated, so that Millhone can pay her bills. The search for a missing witness to a car accident overlaps the search for the primary villain. Grafton has set the scenes in the two stories in such a way as to make the overlap seamless and absolutely believable. Each book in the series is set at sequential intervals in the 80s - before cell phones. This way, Kinsey Millhone gets shot at, arrested, threatened and harassed, all without backup coming anytime soon. What a life just to avoid a 9 to 5 schedule. What a ride!
BolivarJ More than 1 year ago
Kinsey Millhone, Sue Grafton " I know there will always be someone poised to take advantage of the vulnerable: the very young, the very old, and the innocent of any age. I know this from long experience. Solana Rojas was one..." And so begins the prologue of "T is for Trespass" one of the most interesting yet dark and touching stories Grafton has written. T is for Trespass is a sad, touching, and very dark tale of injustice taken from real life through the eyes of our own heroin P.I. Kinsey Millhone. Meet Solana Rojas, the villain sociopath of the story. Grafton does a wonderful job as usual creating characters that become as real as our neighbors next door. She develops Solana's character from her early childhood up to her adulthood. What' more important, by the end of the book, Grafton makes Solana's name a symbol of evil's keen desire to take advantage on the innocent. Solana's social and malign background set the tone of the book very early in the story, and enable readers a glimpse of the atrocities and the mayhem Solana is about to commit. Grafton Plot and writing style is at her best, As usual we find P.I. K Millhone dealing with a couple of cases at the same time, in this case what can be characterized as insurance fraud and the anatomy of the perpetrator. Grafton always manages to overlap all cases together and make the story not only interesting but very real. Taken from today's news, but having taken place in the late eighties Grafton touches in many social subjects such as: Identity theft, Elder abuse, sex offenders, family values, and the failure of the entities that are supposed to oversee them. T is for Terrific, because in the 20the installment of the Millhone's series, Grafton takes P.I. Kinsey Millhone through a journey of fighting evil to protect the innocent. Grafton's pace is magnificent, a page turner.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I always feel like I'm visiting a friend when I read Sue Grafton's work and I almost hate to come to the end of the book, because that means my visit is over. So it was with Trespass. I thoroughly enjoyed this book as I have all the others in the series. Each one of Ms. Grafton's Kinsey Millhone mysteries is a good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am a fan of the series, and feel that this latest book may indeed be the best of all. The very real possibility of exploitation of the elderly is treated honestly, openly, and compassionately, while maintaining the integrity of the characters that populate the series as a whole. This has been skillfully melded with the very contemporary issue of identity theft, making the reader feel just a little vulnerable and determined to be rather more careful in trusting strangers, a wise practice in these times.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read all of the alphabet books, and this is one of the best. It does take some 'dark' turns, but that's to be expected considering the subject matter. I was both sad, and a little relieved, when the story ended. After reading it, I think you'll understand what I mean.
Bookworm1951 More than 1 year ago
One of the best in the series. Not your typical murder mystery but a study of a true evil personality. Back again are the familiar characters in Kinsey's life that we have all come to know and love: Henry, Rosie, etc. The ending was a bit predictable. Again, Kinsey gets beaten up and almost killed. Well written and edited. A must read for fans of this alphabet murder series.
Gaph More than 1 year ago
Loved this book. One of the best so far in the series ! I adore Kinsey, I will be very sad when the series ends. Ms Grafton needs to keep it going.
Carolaa More than 1 year ago
As with all the books in this series, I could not put this down. Sue Grafton knows how to keep you on the edge of your seat. My hope is that she writes many, many more books.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having been a Sue Grafton fan for years, and having already read 'A' through 'S' I awaited the release of this book with great anticipation. However, this book was slow and arduous to read. Grafton's newest criminal , Sonya Rojas, is interesting, but not enough so to make this a 'page turner'. This is my least favorite of all of her books.
Anonymous 7 months ago
I can't get enough
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I HAVE READ EVERYONE PRIOR to T and it just gets better.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Totally awesome
HaveninFla More than 1 year ago
T is for terrific in this one. A sly tale that is knowing in the ways of the human heart - evil as well as good ones.
Sherri_Hunter More than 1 year ago
The more I get to know Kinsey Millhone, the more I like her. This character is so interesting on her own, she has great strength of character and integrity and though she is flawed and makes mistakes, she doesn’t let it stop her from doing the right thing, even if doing the right thing causes her problems. I also enjoy her observant outlook on the world around her. She’s very intuitive and that serves her well in her day to day activities. Without her high level of perception, the outcome would have been much more horrific for the victims because the predator in this story is someone you should be able to trust. Someone you hire to care for your elderly parent, grandparent, uncle or aunt. Someone you rely on to have the needs of your loved one as their number one priority. When Kinsey’s cranky neighbor, Gus Vronsky takes a fall, it doesn’t take long for Kinsey and her landlord, Henry, to realize that Gus needs help. Kinsey is able to track down Gus’s only living relative, a niece who lives on the other side of the country. She hires a nurse to care for Gus, but she does not realize the woman she hired is not who she thinks she is. This woman is a predator who has assumed numerous identities over the years to ingratiate herself into the homes of her elderly patients, where in addition to drugging and stealing from them, she ultimately murders them. When Kinsey starts looking into the background of Gus’s nurse, she does not anticipate how shrewd this predator is and how she manages to stay just a few steps ahead of Kinsey. I enjoyed the cat and mouse game the author illustrates as Kinsey tries to figure out Solana’s plan only to have to backtrack and rethink it when Kinsey finds herself outwitted. I admired Kinsey’s vigilance and determination to protect Gus, in spite of his less than nice personality. Though she was certainly not required to step in and could have very easily ignored the matter as not any of her business, I liked that Kinsey’s instincts draw her into the matter so that she feels obligated to take action. I enjoyed the whole book, but the last few chapters are what drew me in. The anxiety building suspense was a real nail-biter as Kinsey has to first rescue Gus and then deal with the retaliation from Solana. The ending was completely unexpected but well played out. I recommend this book to all fans of mystery, thriller or suspense novels, but don’t start in the middle of the alphabet with this series. In order to understand the all of the character’s backstory, I recommend this series be read in order.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read all of the books in order, and this has been the best one by far! Couldn't wait to find out how it would end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I LOVE this series and I am concerned that we are nearing the end of the alphabet. This was a terrific book. It covered quite a few areas that will haunt me for awhile. Anyone with elderly family (most of us) should really take this book to heart. Again, just fabulous, and yes sad, but still fabulous. I am always sorry when I get to the end of Ms. Grafton's books. I feel like Kinsey and Henry live just around the corner and what good friends they are :>) I can't wait for our next visit.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
kronan1 More than 1 year ago
I've read the whole series but........................................................................... This one didn't do it for me.   Ihad to force myself to finish the book.   A first for a Kinsey Millhone.   Kinsey never seems to grow and the bad guy in this was plain boring.   I was very disappointed
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Slim20 More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book. It was different from the others. We got to hear things from not only Kinsey's point of view but the villain's as well. Very well written. I also was happy that things were wrapped up more and we got to find out what happened. In what may be her most unsettling novel to date, Sue Grafton's T is for Trespass is also her most direct confrontation with the forces of evil. Beginning slowly with the day-to-day life of a private eye, Grafton suddenly shifts from the voice of Kinsey Millhone to that of Solana Rojas, introducing readers to a chilling sociopath. Rojas is not her birth name. It is an identity she cunningly stole, an identity that gives her access to private caregiving jobs. The true horror of the novel builds with excruciating tension as the reader foresees the awfulness that lies ahead. The suspense lies in whether Millhone will realize what is happening in time to intervene. Though set in the late eighties, T is for Trespass could not be more topical: identity theft; elder abuse; betrayal of trust; the breakdown in the institutions charged with caring for the weak and the dependent. It reveals a terrifying but all-too-real rip in the social fabric. Once again, Grafton opens up new territory with startling results.
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