Tailwind: Days of Cottonmouths and Cotton Candy

Tailwind: Days of Cottonmouths and Cotton Candy

by Lad Moore

Paperback

$13.37 $14.44 Save 7% Current price is $13.37, Original price is $14.44. You Save 7%.

Overview

Lad Moore never knew what tomorrow would bring. Whether he'd spend the night aboard a steamer ploughing the waves to an exotic shore or curled on the back seat of a rusting automobile with a deadbeat circus roustabout. Whether his next new friend would be a daredevil flying ace or a penniless hobo. This collection of true short stories tells of a coming of age among cottonmouths and candies – the snakebite and the sweetness of a wide world of wild surprises from the backwoods of Texas to the jungles of the Far East. Blown through his early years like a tumbleweed by the 'Tailwind' his glamorous absentee father used as his aviation call sign, and fearing his harsh Oriental stepmother, he lived in envy of kids in the humdrum mainstream of solid family structure. Only when he looked back over half a century of life, did Lad realize that it was the very uncertainty of those bitter-sweet years that had made him the unique man he became … and that it was time to write down the whole breathless adventure. These experiences – fabulous in the truest sense of the word – fuelled the unquenchable curiosity and strength of will that formed the core of a man who was to become successful in business and a master in the art of story-telling. How can good come from evil? How can adversity reap character? As these stories tell: It's all about lessons learned by doing and the influence of wisdom where it is least expected. It's all about listening and seeing – with the senses honed to a razor's edge. It's all about harnessing the tailwind. Publisher's note: As it says on the BeWrite website we try to give value for money and we have again with this book, if you care to take a look...

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781904492023
Publisher: BeWrite Books
Publication date: 02/28/2003
Pages: 243
Product dimensions: 5.08(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author

Lad Moore is a former corporate vice-president who left the boardroom in 1998 and returned to his roots in “Deep East Texas”—the fountainhead for much of his writing. He retired to a small farm near mysterious Caddo Lake and the historic steamboat town of Jefferson. In the solitude of those surroundings, when not writing, he walks the piney trails among the muscadines—with his “ever-encouraging” Australian Shepherd, Quigley. Life experiences are splashed freely into his writings. His early years were like a pinball game, shuffling among caring family members between stints at military school. His parents divorced early, and his father was always away—following his dream, soldier of fortune style. There were years of rare adventure—life in strife-torn Indonesia, Burma, and a year on board a steamer-freighter sailing the world. In high school he joined a circus—only one event in a series of rites of passages that he reflects upon in his stories. He has written and published many of his works. A collection of stories, Odie Dodie, has been published by BeWrite Books. A second collection, Firefly Rides, is nearing completion. A non-fiction work in progress, Offspring of the Tiger, will portray what he calls his ‘dizzy’ relationship with his father—one of the storied Hump Pilots of World War II The author is honored to have been published more than two hundred times—including in Carolina Country, Amarillo Bay, The Pittsburg Quarterly, The Paumanok Review, Eclectica, Manx, Danforth Review, Literary House, The Virginia Adversaria, Adirondack Review, and in AIM, America’s Intercultural Magazine. His four-story anthology, Natcherly Bad, was featured Creativity Magazine. His prize-winning story, “The Firmament of the Third Day,” was published in the Fiction Writers Association’s Best of Carve Magazine Anthology. “Burger Recollections,” a burger-shop memoir, has been featured in ABC’s of Food by Peach Blossom Press. In addition, Mr. Moore is a past winner of The Wordhammer Award and the Silver Quill. His short story “The Day Hunter” was nominated for a 2002 Fiction Award at The Texas Institute of Letters.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Tailwind - Days of Cottonmouths and Cotton Candy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
aplazar on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Tailwind: Days of Cottonmouths and Cotton Candy, by Lad Moore, shines with vignettes that drip like pearls of dew, one at a time, to be savored as cool water on a parched tongue. Each story, replete with humor and pathos, transports the reader to the world of rural East Texas in the mid-twentieth century. Mr. Moore¿s boyhood was filled with toy soldiers, hot tar on bare feet, fireflies, and shenanigans born of times less electronic, less structured, and certainly less affluent than today. Imagine sitting around a campfire with a storyteller whose history blazes with events so exotic, so traumatic, and yet so rich that they captivate you with more intensity than the biggest Hollywood blockbuster. Now, envision the author speaking in a comfortable voice, resonant with humility and humor. This is Lad Moore. This is a writer for all mankind, a universal genius. Mr. Moore writes with a folksy elegance that is unparalleled in this age. Reminiscent of the great American masters, Tailwind should and will be included as a fundamental part of America¿s heritage. The ultimate revelation comes when readers discover that Mr. Moore¿s tales are true ¿ stemming from a tumultuous and difficult childhood in which he was abandoned by his mother at six months, barely raised by a glamorous, oft-absent father, and shipped off to military school at the age of eight. Betrayed by his father¿s second wife, who stole the family fortune, Mr. Moore suffered poverty with his beloved grandmother, but thankfully was taught of deeper riches via her warm affection and exemplary morality.Tailwind becomes an extension of one¿s being. This reader allowed himself a story every few days ¿ stretching the experience as long as possible, relishing each chapter with nostalgic reverence. Take for example, the following vignettes: In ¿Bologna Sandwich Ceasefires,¿ young Lad entertains himself with sweetgum armies, creating legions of soldiers from twigs, spent shotgun casings, and acorn hulls. Using rubber band missiles, he demolishes entire battalions in an afternoon. ¿Cannon fire ¿ sweetgum burs collected in a Mrs. Tucker¿s lard can ¿ rained down on the standing forces from the hill above them. Shots fell equally, alternating between the armies, with full sound effects coughed out from deep in my throat. After the barrage, casualty count determined the winner and loser. Soldiers that lost their upright stance from the bombardment must be broken in half ¿ not to be recycled. A mass grave awaited them in the storm sewer.¿ In ¿Nitelites,¿ young Lad imagines he is a railway signalman, waving firefly ¿lanterns¿ in the air as trains rush past in the dark night. He confesses of ¿smudge pot rolling,¿ as well. ¿¿rolling smudge pots was worth it. I could suffer a little tennis-shoe cleanup to see the trail of flaming oil spilling out as the pot rolled down the street. On a good hill, and a skillful roll, I could leave a fireline from Henry¿s store all the way to the underpass. Sometimes a few magnolia leaves would catch fire and add to the excitement.¿ In ¿Solomon of Hardesty Farm,¿ Mr. Moore describes the enduring friendship of young Lad and an elderly black farmhand in times when racial bigotry was common. ¿Old Solomon towered over me like a big tree with his little spectacles hanging from his nose like a pine cone, ready to break free and fall¿.Like a detour barricade, Solomon stood between the grape rows with his hoe, its handle worn slick and stained by the sweat from his hands. He moved in reverse like the fiddler crab zigging in the aisles of dirt.¿In ¿New Cars of Short Duration,¿ Mr. Moore describes the sorrow of a callous older brother who wrecked their deceased father¿s 1956 Buick almost as soon as he claimed it. Describing the incident, Mr. Moore says, ¿It had that strange smell of broken windshield glass ¿ an almost sweet odor ¿ like nutmeg and hot plastic.¿ When young Lad harbored hopes of owning a car for himself, they were dashed. ¿My dreams collapsed like a seve
Guest More than 1 year ago
Tailwind shines with vignettes that drip like pearls of dew, one at a time, to be savored as cool water on a parched tongue. Each story, replete with humor and pathos, transports the reader to the world of rural East Texas in the mid-twentieth century. Mr. Moore¿s boyhood was filled with toy soldiers, hot tar on bare feet, fireflies, and shenanigans born of times less electronic, less structured, and certainly less affluent than today. Imagine sitting around a campfire with a storyteller whose history blazes with events so exotic, so traumatic, and yet so rich that they captivate you with greater intensity than the biggest Hollywood blockbuster. Now, envision the author speaking in a comfortable voice, resonant with humility and humor. This is Lad Moore. This is a writer for all mankind, a universal genius. Mr. Moore writes with a folksy elegance that is unparalleled in this age. Reminiscent of the great American masters, Tailwind should and will be included as a fundamental part of America¿s heritage. The ultimate revelation comes when readers discover that Mr. Moore¿s tales are true ¿ stemming from a tumultuous and difficult childhood in which he was abandoned by his mother at six months, barely raised by a glamorous, oft-absent father, and shipped off to military school at the age of eight. Betrayed by his father¿s second wife, who stole the family fortune, Mr. Moore suffered poverty with his beloved grandmother, but thankfully was taught of deeper riches via her warm affection and exemplary morality. Tailwind becomes an extension of one¿s being. This reader allowed himself a story every few days ¿ stretching the experience as long as possible, relishing each chapter with nostalgic reverence. Take for example, the following vignettes: In ¿Bologna Sandwich Ceasefires,¿ young Lad entertains himself with sweetgum armies, creating legions of soldiers from twigs, spent bullet casings, and acorn hulls. Using rubber band missiles, he demolishes entire battalions in an afternoon. ¿Cannon fire ¿ sweetgum burs collected in a Mrs. Tucker¿s lard can ¿ rained down on the standing forces from the hill above them. Shots fell equally, alternating between the armies, with full sound effects coughed out from deep in my throat. After the barrage, casualty count determined the winner and loser. Soldiers that lost their upright stance from the bombardment must be broken in half ¿ not to be recycled. A mass grave awaited them in the storm sewer.¿ In ¿Nitelites,¿ young Lad imagines he is a railway signalman, waving firefly ¿lanterns¿ in the air as trains rush past in the dark night. He confesses of ¿smudge pot rolling,¿ as well. ¿¿rolling smudge pots was worth it. I could suffer a little tennis-shoe cleanup to see the trail of flaming oil spilling out as the pot rolled down the street. On a good hill, and a skillful roll, I could leave a fireline from Hendry¿s store all the way to the underpass. Sometimes a few magnolia leaves would catch fire and add to the excitement.¿ In ¿Solomon of Hardesty Farm,¿ Mr. Moore describes the enduring friendship of young Lad and an elderly black farmhand in times when racial bigotry was common. ¿Old Solomon towered over me like a big tree with his little spectacles hanging from his nose like a pine cone, ready to break free and fall¿.Like a detour barricade, Solomon stood between the grape rows with his hoe, its handle worn slick and stained by the sweat from his hands. He moved in reverse like the fiddler crab zigging in the aisles of dirt.¿ In ¿New Cars of Short Duration,¿ Mr. Moore describes the pain of having a callous older brother who wrecked their deceased father¿s 1956 Buick almost as soon as he claimed it. Describing the incident, Mr. Moore writes, ¿It had that strange smell of broken windshield glass ¿ an almost sweet odor ¿ like nutmeg and hot plastic.¿ When young Lad harbored hopes of owning a car for himself, they were dashed. ¿My dreams collapsed like a
Guest More than 1 year ago
A review by RD Larson Tailwind Days of Cottonmouths and Cotton Candy By Lad Moore If you had been born in poverty and abandoned, how would you live your life? If you were shuffled from place to place, how would you be grounded in rationality? If your homes were always in an uproar and your life was in turmoil, how would you manage? This is the story a meritorious boy that overcomes obstacles that cause most people to falter. As we struggle to teach our children and grandchildren we wonder endlessly about what will happen to them. In Tailwind, here¿s a boy that will fill your heart and soul, and give you encouragement. How would you like to have a boy who is decent, intelligent and perceptive? Any family would like to have a brave sweet boy like that. Or we even would like to BE that boy. If we had the integrity and strength, would we do so well in such circumstances? If you do nothing else this summer, read Tailwind by Lad Moore. With far more depth than ¿The Painted House¿ by John Gresham, Tailwind evokes a memory of a greater time of simplicity and a greater strength of character. You won¿t know you are reading as much as you¿ll know you are living his story. As ¿Catcher in the Rye¿ still follows us many years after reading it, this wonderful book will do even more. Within it¿s pages is a boy-man who takes our heart and enlarges it, making us grow with him, as he faces the sometimes dreadful and sometimes hilarious ups and downs of his adventurous life. Sometimes a book is a classic the first year it is published. Tailwind is such a book. Read it and reap the harvest of a good soul found in writer Lad Moore.