The Tale of Genji (Abridged)

The Tale of Genji (Abridged)

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Overview

The Tale of Genji (Abridged) by Murasaki Shikibu

"The Tale of Genji" by Lady Muraski is one of the world's most influential novels. As the first psychological novel, "The Tale of Genji" delves into the motivations and thoughts of the main characters, which had never been done in previous novels. The famous Japanese story is about Genji, the son of an emperor. When his mother died, Genji's father married another woman who greatly resembled Genji's mother. However, Genji fell in love with his new stepmother, causing problems between him and his own wife. He pursues a number of affairs, and is eventually exiled from the Capitol to a small, rural town. While Lady Murasaki did not base "The Tale of Genji" on a true story, she was inspired by a Minister in the royal court. She wrote the story in small installments for the ladies of the court, which might explain why the story was never "finished;" Lady Murasaki intended to keep the stories going as long as she possibly could. She also created some of the most memorable female characters in literature. As such, "The Tale of Genji" is widely considered to be one of the greatest works in the Japanese literature canon, as well as one of the most influential works of storytelling. Contained in this volume is the abridged translation of Suematsu Kencho.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781420946451
Publisher: Neeland Media
Publication date: 01/01/2012
Pages: 138
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.32(d)

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The Tale of Genji 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wish I'd realized... if you enlarge the cover it says abridged, but nowhere does the description say this. So, I've got an abridged ebook, and there are no returns on ebooks. Really annoyed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Genji is the ultimate Prince. So much admire by everyone and so dear to many people around him. His elegance and grace surpassed anything that exist before him. Superbly written to give us a glimse into 11 century Japan Imperial Court. The Tale of Genji brings readers to a new threshold of enjoyment and fascination.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Warning! This is only volume 1 and not the whole book.
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Hill_Ravens More than 1 year ago
The Tale of Genji is quite the adventure of one prince in Japan. Through many unfortunate events Genji continues on his way through life trying to remain positive and happy. However, he fails miserably in several affairs, is betrothed to a Princess several years older than he who hates him for unexplained reasons. Through every extra marital affair Genji explores (and there are many) he has horrible luck as well. He always falls in love with what he can't have and then looses interest when the affections are returned. He runs several prominent women into the nunnery by his behavior and even has several die on him. He kidnaps another Prince's daughter because he wanted to, and then drives her crazy with his hot and cold advances. I think I delighted in his adventures with his friends, more than all the late night excursions he went to with various ladies. The court life and festivals were described beautifully and added a richer element to the tale. The description of wardrobes, poems, artistic works and explanations on why each of these was used in certain situation was very enjoyable. Overall, I would have preferred a more historically based story, than what ended feeling like nothing more than one mans indiscretions and all that can possibly go wrong. He should have corked himself up, and his life might have been less stressful and painful in the end.
andoroh More than 1 year ago
I was a bit skeptical when I bought the book and thought I would hold off on reading it until better times (when I have nothing else to read). But once I read couple of pages I wasn't able to stop. The language is very beautiful, even though it's hard to understand sometimes. The poem and verses that the characters address to each other are very touching and actually express their feelings more than author's narration would have. In the beginning of the book the translator said that the book was written in stages, that the author didn't write the whole thing all together, but rather had it unfold over couple of years. And it's actually very noticable, if you compare the writing in the beginning and at the end. But I think it's a very unique way of writing a book or a novel, because we can see that the author matured over the years and, so did the writing style. Over all I think it's a really good book and I definitely did not expect it. I also believe that this book really shows how different that time was comparing to ours. When I was reading this book I started to compare how everyone treated each other and how men behaved towards women....... This book makes you think about certain topics of our every day lives.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Tale of Genji is a very good read. You must however, alot quite a bit of time and then sometimes reread certain sections. Genji is a wonderful book in which matters of the heart are looked at from a different era and by a different prespective. Genji is written in the time of the Imperial Court of Japan and offers the reader a little look at what life was like during that time. Genji is quite the playboy and he has the love of several different women. In some ways I feel sorrow for Genji. He is looking so hard for love that he doesn't realize he has it all along. I also think when it comes to insight, the book is great in this respect because it is written by a female author who is considered to be one of the greatest Japanese artist of her time. Once again a very good book, but lenghty.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Very good book about the Japanese Imperial Court. The translator soothed the major pain of the difficult names of the characters. In the original Japanese and translated Chinese versions (which is very close to Japanese). Yet, you should read the original if you can or Chinese or Korean (not as good as Chinese) translations. The character names are very difficult. For example, when a comcubine becomes a queen, she sometimes takes another title and it is very easy to get lost in the book. Also, in the original, the some characters are not given names until much later or not at all. Yet, overall, this book is excellent. If you really enjoyed this book, try the Red Chamber Dream. The story is somewhat similar yet is way better in poetry, characters, and major plot line.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Tale of Genji unfolds almost like a modern-day soap opera. And although the tale touches on the historical importance of its time, most of the book is focused solely on the love affairs men enjoyed with women and the consequences that came about. With knowledge that the book was written by a woman, where in her time women wrote to entertain themselves, it is fair to say that The Tale of Genji succeeds in providing its intended female audience a grand entertaining tale. So absorbed is the book with love affairs, however, that one is left wondering if even the males enjoyed any other activities in life other than their personal relationships. The book¿s description of its characters, particularly that of Genji leave a powerful impression on the reader. The tale is surprisingly engrossing and enjoyable to read, but at times difficult to follow. It seems the tale is indeed ¿patched together¿ as often times readers may find themselves returning back to previous chapters to understand exactly what is being discussed. It is worth noting that an interesting aspect of the novel is its wide use of poetry. There are literally hundreds of poems located within the novel, and like the novel itself, these poems, though entertaining, can be difficult to follow for the general reader. Perhaps the book¿s biggest disappointments occur with the death of Genji. It is hard to imagine the main character and hero of the book dead long before the book reaches its end, but that is precisely what occurs in this novel. The general reader may find it difficult to adjust to an almost completely new set of characters with a similar plot for the remaining chapters. Of course it is the novel¿s length that is most difficult to bear. The novel endlessly stretches on without a solid plot or timeline that makes it seem never-ending. When the end is finally reached, the reader may be disappointed that the book seems unfinished and startlingly comes to an abrupt end without notice. All in all, this book might be recommended only for those with a true appreciation of Japanese writing. It is not a book that even the most avid of readers will be able to breeze through it requires a slower, more methodical method of reading. In fact, it is very likely that the reader will want to return to parts of the novel several times seeking clarity or further explanation as events unfold. This is not a story that has a clear structure. The story does seem to jump around a bit, and even though it offers much love and tragedy, it fails to satisfy the reader with its less-than-exciting ending. For its history alone and the very way it came to exist in today¿s literature collections, the book deserves at least three stars out of five.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Didnt even buy it