The Tale of Genji: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

The Tale of Genji: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

Paperback(Reprint)

$20.64 $32.00 Save 36% Current price is $20.64, Original price is $32. You Save 36%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Friday, September 22 , Order now and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.
    Same Day delivery in Manhattan. 
    Details

Overview

The Tale of Genji: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition) by Murasaki Shikibu

The original novel—a classic of Japanese and world literature and a stunningly beautiful story

Written in the eleventh century, this exquisite portrait of courtly life in medieval Japan is widely celebrated as the world’s first novel. Genji, the Shining Prince, is the son of an emperor. He is a passionate character whose tempestuous nature, family circumstances, love affairs, alliances, and shifting political fortunes form the core of this magnificent epic. Royall Tyler’s superior translation is detailed, poetic, and superbly true to the Japanese original while allowing the modern reader to appreciate it as a contemporary treasure. Supplemented with detailed notes, glossaries, character lists, and chronologies to help the reader navigate the multigenerational narrative, this comprehensive edition presents this ancient tale in the grand style that it deserves.
 
This Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition features French flaps and deckle-edged paper.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780142437148
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 11/28/2002
Series: Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition Series
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 1216
Sales rank: 326,814
Product dimensions: 6.30(w) x 9.20(h) x 2.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Murasaki Shikibu, born in 978, was a member of Japan's Fujiwara clan, which ruled behind the scenes during the Heian Period by providing the brides and courtesans of all the emperors. Lady Murasaki's rare literary talent, particularly her skill as a poet, secured her a place in the court of Empress Akiko. After the death of her husband, she cloistered herself to study Buddhism, raise her daughter, and write the world's first novel Genji Monogatari, the tale of the shining Prince Genji.
Royall Tyler was born in London, England, and grew up in Massachusetts, England, Washington D.C., and Paris. He has a B.A. in Far Eastern Languages from Harvard, and an M.A. in Japanese History and Ph. D. in Japanese literature from Columbia University. He has taught Japanese language and culture at, among other places, Ohio State University, the University of Wisconsin, and the University of Oslo, in Norway. Beginning in 1990, he taught at the Australian National University, in Canberra, from which he retired at the end of 2000. He will spend the American academic year 2001-02 as a Visiting Professor at Harvard.

Royall Tyler and his wife Susan live in a rammed earth house on 100 acres in the bush about seventy miles from Canberra, where they breed alpacas as a hobby.

Royall Tyler’s previous works include Japanese Noh Dramas, a selection and translation of Noh plays published by Penguin; Japanese Tales and French Folktales, anthologies published by Pantheon; and The Miracles of the Kasuga Deity, a study of a medieval Japanese cult published by Columbia University Press.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Tale of Genji 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
Npb More than 1 year ago
Despite linking to this page from the unabridged Seidensticker edition, this is neither Seidensticker nor unabridged. My rating here is meaningless. It only reflects the fact that I had to give a rating to post this comment.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed reading this book, most of the times. It was a great read in a reality, but you really have to follow it closely. There really is no way that you can't pay attention and absorb what's being said. Every time my mind wondered away from what I was reading, I found myself at a loss of what I just read. Therefore, it was confusing at times with all the jumping around and some of the descriptions, but there was great detail that made the book well-written. I would definitely recommend this book, but only to those who are interested in history and especially Japanese history. It was an excellent insight on their culture that I enjoyed completely. I truly believed that the author, Murasaki, got her point across quite well. This story was obviously written for mainly women audiences and I believe that she achieved her purpose in doing so. She was able to get across how women lived and were treated in the eleventh century of Japan that she was living in herself. She made it clear about her place in society and what it was like, so she was able to get it across very well. She definitely accomplished her purpose in educating the reader on how life was like for women in such a time period.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Though The Tale of Genji was well-written, I personally found it a boring read. Many parts of the book are difficult to understand and I had to re-read them many times. Also, I think the book would be better suited for people more interested in history, because of its details of the eleventh century time period. I also thought that the story was more about women in the time period, and how they were treated, then about the character Genji himself. I felt like the book just seemed to run on at some points. I would not recommend this book to someone unless they have a great interest in history. However, I do think that the author got her purpose across, and the book was well-written based on the topic. The book was about life during the Imperial Court in Japan. The plot follows Genji's life, taking the reader through many of the affairs that he went through so they could get a detailed glimpse of life in this time period such as love affairs, politics, and the culture. I think that the author targeted the book at a women audience based on the many women characters seen throughout the novel and the look the author gives the reader on how they were treated.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although it's a slow read because you have to pay close attention- every detail counts- this has to be one of the best books I've ever read. It's long, but worth every second it takes to read it. If you're interested in the Japanese culture, this is a great book. It tells a wonderful, enthralling tale that intrigues you and keeps you going- it makes you want more. If you don't get into it in the first few chapters- don't give up hope- you'd be passing by one of the greatest novels ever written. Just have some patience and stick with it. It will definitely pay off.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like this well enough but i really thought need edited.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Map: "genji" res 6- main rp area <p>"genji" res 7- bios <p>Rules: no NSFW roleplaying, no mary sues, no overpowered characters, don't be a di<_>ck, post at least once every 2 days unless you say that you're going to be inactive beforehand, no drama, etc. <p>Have fun! (\_/) <b> (&bull;v&bull;)
coffeephilosopher More than 1 year ago
The description doesn't tell you that it's incredibly abridged... like one tenth the length of the original book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is an exquisite tale of a adored 11th century Japanese prince. Although the sheer size may be off-putting, you should definitely reconsider, especially if you are a fan of Asian culture. The story and particularly the characters are sometimes hard to follow but once you are secure with the rhythm and style of Murasaki's writing, you will be utterly enthralled.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
To settle a running issue in the reviews, I just purchased this book, it is indeed UNABRIDGED. The only "flaw", is the OCR of the original book converted all of the ending "Os" in the Japanese names into a "?" or question mark. Sad, for it mars a perfect book. When I have completed reading the book, then I will provide a content review.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Eventhough I have not read it yet, but from the review I'm very sure it's a very very interesting book. Please read it and support the asian culture!~