A Tale of Love and Darkness

A Tale of Love and Darkness

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A Tale of Love and Darkness 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
habod More than 1 year ago
This memoir by a very gifted writer will never leave you. The piercing honesty and the lovely prose with which the author weaves his fascinating story have left an indelible and intricate tracing through my brain. Read it and you will see why.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A Tale of Love and Darkness is a hilarious though serious book about the life of the author in the historical setting of Jerusalem and the Holy Land. Being the great storyteller he is, Amos Oz made the true events so easy to relate to, and as such this book is remarkable.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I don't get it. I tried to wade through this book and had to stop a quarter of the way. Sure it's rich and reads like poetry, but it is in desperate need of structure and editing. I enjoy learning about some of the founders of Israel and the great writers of the country's past, but reading this memoir is like walking through quick sand and there seems to be no plot or plan. It's almost as if Mr. Oz just sat down and wrote whatever came into his head and that's what ended up in print - with no one giving it a once-over and revising it for the most effectiveness or the reader's sake. This book is going to sit on my bedside and wait for me to finish it. I'm totally unimpressed - even by one of Israel's greatest writers.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
If it is true that Oz wants to be remembered for 'The Same Sea', then, sadly, he has outwritten his own favorite with 'A Tale of Love and Darkness'. In 'The Same Sea' Oz began to write openly to his parents yet it is only here that we learn the full story. If we, as readers, love anything of Oz, this 'memoir' written in his twilight is his greatest gift to us, the simplest proof of his humanity, eroticism and insight into the world he has been so kind as to lend us.
Guest More than 1 year ago
&#65279 Amos Oz likes to say ¿the first thing you should know about [his] autobiography is that it¿s not an autobiography. It¿s an imposition forced on [him] by the Library of Congress.¿ An interesting confession considering A Tale was published under the genre ¿memoir¿ and went on to reap much acclaim - and quite a bit of money -- as a memoir, including The Koret Jewish Book Award for Autobiography. Asked by befuddled interviewers to clarify himself, Mr. Oz will say only that having asked the dead into his home, they told him the stories he never heard. This is a writerly response, with much truth and sense, but it doesn¿t excuse Mr. Oz for allowing his publisher to tout the work a memoir or to blame the Library of Congress. Actually, a good old-fashioned name exists: a semi-biographical novel. Or, if that¿s not hip enough, call it a post-modernist novel, then, a nod and a wink to the writer to figure out what is real and what isn¿t. As it stands,the many fans of Mr. Oz --- until now I¿ve considered myself one --- believe they¿re hearing true stories, not stories conjured by the artist if he listens hard to ghosts. This past year we¿ve been brutal on American writers who¿ve played on the popular taste for the truth. We¿ve held them to standards and shouted ¿foul¿ when they haven¿t lived up to them. It saddens me that a great fiction writer like Mr. Oz hasn¿t held himself to a higher standard. ¿Oz¿ in Hebrew, we¿re reminded again and again, means ¿strength.¿ As a ¿moral conscience¿, as we¿re also reminded again and again, Mr. Oz demands ¿strength¿ from Israelis and Palestinians alike. And yet he wants us to accept with a titter of laughter that he was somehow coerced into calling his Tale of Love and Darkness a memoir. Shame on him. He should know better --- and something tells me he does.