ISBN-10:
0130961469
ISBN-13:
9780130961464
Pub. Date:
08/04/1998
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Talented Children and Adults: Their Development and Education / Edition 2

Talented Children and Adults: Their Development and Education / Edition 2

by Jane Piirto

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780130961464
Publisher: Pearson Education
Publication date: 08/04/1998
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 648
Product dimensions: 7.54(w) x 9.14(h) x 0.96(d)

Table of Contents

PART I OVERVIEW OF THE FIELD OF TALENT DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 1(184)
CHAPTER 1 WHO ARE THE TALENTED? GIFTEDNESS, TALENT, AND INTELLIGENCE
2(44)
Definitions of Intelligence, Giftedness, Talent, and Genius
5(3)
School Definitions of Giftedness
5(1)
The Marland Report
6(1)
1988: The Javits Gifted and Talented Act
7(1)
National Excellence: A New School Definition of Giftedness
7(1)
History of Intelligence Testing
8(2)
The g Factor
9(1)
The Use of IQ to Sort and Discriminate
9(1)
Definitions of Intelligence
10(2)
More on "g"
10(1)
Fluid and Crystalilized Intelligence
11(1)
The Lumpers and the Splitters
12(1)
Heredity and Environment
12(3)
Darwin and Galton and the Statistical Average
12(1)
What Twin and Adoptive Studies Have Shown About Heritability of Intelligence
13(2)
Definitions of Giftedness and Talent
15(2)
Etymology of the Word Gifted
15(1)
Issues of Labeling
16(1)
Etymology of the Word Talented
16(1)
Theories of Giftedness That Have Influenced the Field
17(7)
A New Paradigm
18(1)
Developmental Theories of Intelligence
18(3)
Cognitive Theories of Intelligence
21(3)
Psychosocial Theories of Giftedness
24(2)
Comprehensive Theories
26(2)
The Author's Position
28(2)
The Piirto Pyramid of Talent Development
30(4)
1. The Genetic Aspect
30(1)
2. The Emotional Aspect: Personality Attributes
31(1)
3. The Cognitive Aspect
32(1)
4. The Talent Aspect
33(1)
5. The Environmental Aspect
34(1)
A Giftedness Construct
34(6)
Controversies over the Giftedness Construct
35(1)
A Proposed Giftedness Construct
36(4)
Case Example: Using the Pyramid of Talent Development in the Inclusionary Classroom
40(5)
Summary
45(1)
CHAPTER 2 GETTING STARTED: DEVELOPING A PROGRAM FOR THE TALENTED
46(44)
The Need for Awareness
49(1)
History of U.S. Education of the Talented
49(1)
Typical Historical Arrangements for Talented Children
50(4)
Acceleration
50(3)
Grouping
53(1)
Special Schools
53(1)
Zeitgeist and the Education of the Talented
54(1)
State of the States
55(1)
The Law and Academically Talented Students
56(1)
Setting Up a Program
56(4)
The Planning Committee
56(2)
The Necessity for Collaboration Between General Education and Talent Development Education
58(1)
A Program and Not a Provision
58(2)
Outcome-Based Education for the High-Ability Student
60(1)
Educational Program Options
61(16)
Ability Grouping
61(3)
Acceleration/Enrichment
64(2)
Cooperative Learning as a Technique for Teaching the Talented
66(1)
Flexible Grouping
67(1)
Teaching, Waiting, and Helping
67(1)
Pullout or Self-Contained?
68(3)
Regular Classroom Modifications
71(1)
Resource Rooms
72(1)
Self-Contained Classes/Special Schools
72(2)
Inclusion, Intervention, Consultation, Facilitation
74(3)
Do Special Programs for the Talented Have an Impact?
77(1)
Teachers of the Talented
77(3)
Program Evaluation
80(6)
Using Longitudinal Data for Evaluation
82(4)
Case Example: Four Years as a Consulting Teacher for the Gifted and Talented
86(3)
Summary
89(1)
CHAPTER 3 IDENTIFICATION OF THE ACADEMICALLY TALENTED: HIGH-IQ TALENT AND SPECIFIC ACADEMIC TALENT
90(46)
Identifying and Serving the Academically Talented
95(1)
Program Plans Must Precede Identification
96(1)
The Principles and Challenges of Identification
96(5)
Equity
97(2)
The Need for a Guiding Theory
99(1)
Conflicts Between Theory and Practice
100(1)
Multiple Means of Identification
101(7)
Proficiency Tests
101(1)
Behavioral Checklists
102(1)
Super Documented Performance
102(1)
The Use of Matrices
102(2)
Use of Multiple Means Can Be Discriminatory
104(1)
The Use of Standard Scores
104(1)
The Use of Local Norms in Identification
105(1)
Identifying Personality Variables
106(1)
Once Identified, Always Identified?
107(1)
The Steps of Identification
108(5)
Alternative and Authentic Means of Screening
108(3)
Effectiveness and Efficiency
111(1)
The Hazards and Benefits of Teacher Nomination
111(2)
The IQ Test
113(4)
IQ Tests and Socioeconomic Status
114(1)
Can We Change a Person's IQ
115(1)
When to Use an IQ Test
115(1)
Issues of Equity and Testing
116(1)
The Identification of Academic Ability
117(2)
Group Tests Used for Screening
117(1)
Deviation IQs
118(1)
Proficiency Tests
119(1)
Criteria for Standardized Test Selection and Standards for Testing
119(4)
Is There Adequate Reliability and Validity?
119(3)
Are There Adequate Ceilings?
122(1)
Standards for Teachers Who Use Tests
123(1)
Authentic Assessment
123(7)
Identification of Predictive Behaviors
126(1)
Leisure and Out-of-School Activities as Predictive Behaviors
127(3)
Case Example: Jose
130(5)
Summary
135(1)
CHAPTER 4 IDENTIFICATION OF CREATIVITY
136(49)
History of Creativity Training
140(3)
The Necessity for Practice
140(3)
Educators' Interest in Creativity
143(5)
The Place of Creativity in Education
144(4)
How Teachers and Parents Can Enhance Creativity
148(1)
Creativity Research That Has Influenced the Field of Talent Development Education
148(7)
The Separation of Creativity from Talent
149(3)
Renzulli's Definition
152(1)
The Existence of a Creativity Ability
152(2)
What Enhances and Blocks Creativity
154(1)
Training of the Creativity Ability
155(10)
Creativity Training Systems
155(1)
Teachers Benefit from Creativity Training
155(7)
Teaching Elaboration for Transfer
162(2)
Creativity Since the Marland Report
164(1)
Creativity Assessment
165(9)
Reasons for Measuring Creativity
165(1)
Motive to Create
166(1)
Evaluating Creativity Assessment Instruments
167(3)
Studies of Significant Results
170(1)
The Normal Curve Assumption
171(1)
Checklists and Questionnaires
171(3)
Promising Alternative Assessment Practices
174(7)
Interrater Reliability on Storytelling
174(1)
Performance Criteria
174(1)
Observation of Creativity
175(2)
Identifying Creative Potential by Product Assessment
177(4)
Case Example: Creativity, Inc., A Program for Developing Creativity in Adolescents
181(3)
Summary
184(1)
PART II PATHS OF TALENT DEVELOPMENT 185(172)
CHAPTER 5 THE YOUNG TALENTED CHILD BIRTH TO GRADE TWO
186(38)
Characteristics of Young Academically Talented Children
190(6)
Early Reading
190(2)
Characteristics in Infancy
192(1)
Characteristics of Toddlers
193(1)
Mathematical Ability
194(1)
Dyssynchrony
195(1)
Factors That Enhance or Inhibit Young High-IQ Talent
196(1)
Intensities (Overexcitabilities) as Characteristic of Young Gifted Children
196(1)
Identification of Young Academically Talented Children
197(12)
The Hunter College Elementary School Identification System
197(3)
Identification Through Already-Used Screening Methods
200(1)
The Project Spectrum MI Model of Identification
200(2)
The Kindergarten Screening Instrument
202(1)
Javits Projects: Alternative Ways to Identify
203(6)
Choosing a School
209(1)
Curriculum for Young Academically Talented Children
210(10)
Preschool Curriculum Scope for Academically Talented Children
210(1)
Preschool and Kindergarten Curriculum Scope
211(9)
First Grade Curriculum Scope for Academically Talented Students
220(1)
Case Example: A Plan for Scott
220(3)
Summary
223(1)
CHAPTER 6 THE ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL TALENTED CHILD
224(44)
Predictive Behaviors and Commonly Observed Characteristics of High-IQ Children
227(4)
A Paradigm Shift
230(1)
Predictive Characteristics of Children Talented in Science
231(7)
Fliegler's Checklist
233(1)
Biographical Examples of Science Ability
234(4)
Children Talented in Mathematics
238(2)
Biographical Example of Mathematical Talent
239(1)
Inventors
240(1)
Business and Entrepreneurial Talent
240(1)
Children Talented in Writing or Literary Scholarship
240(4)
Prose Talent
241(2)
Characteristics of Children with Writing Talent
243(1)
Biographical indicators of Verbal Talent
244(1)
Children Talented in Visual Arts
244(2)
Characteristics of Artwork of Visual Arts Talented Children
245(1)
Characteristics of Children Talented in Music
246(5)
Japanese and Chinese Views of Musical Ability
247(1)
Characteristics of Music Talent in Children
248(1)
Examples and Studies of Musical Talent
249(2)
Children Talented in Acting and Dancing
251(4)
Actors
251(2)
Dancers
253(2)
Gender Differences in Talent Development
255(1)
Multiple Intelligence Identification and Reporting
256(1)
The Middle School Challenge
256(5)
Case Example: The School, the Parents, and the Girl
261(6)
Summary
267(1)
CHAPTER 7 HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TALENTED YOUTH
268(48)
Cognitive Components of High Ability
273(2)
Personality Attributes
275(4)
The HSPQ and Academically and Creatively Talented Adolescents
276(1)
Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and Talented Adolescents
277(1)
Academic Self-Esteem in Young Women
278(1)
Domain-Specific Talents
279(3)
Academic Strengths, Interests, and Self-Concept
279(1)
Family Background of Students with Talent
280(1)
Behavioral Rating Scales
282(2)
Science Talent Development
282(8)
Biographical Examples of Science Talent Development
285(3)
Women in Science
288(2)
Mathematics Talent Development
290(3)
Verbal Talent Development
293(2)
Education of Performers
295(8)
Development of Musicians
297(4)
Development of Actors
301(1)
Development of Athletes
302(1)
Visual Arts Development
303(2)
Development of Leaders
305(1)
The Importance of Practical (Tacit) Knowledge
306(2)
Case Example: Predictive Behaviors and Crystallizing Experiences in Three Artistic Male College Students
308(7)
Summary
315(1)
CHAPTER 8 TALENTED ADULTS
316(41)
High-IQ and Academically Talented Adults
319(2)
What Makes for Eminence?
321(3)
The Quantitative Work of Dean Keith Simonton
322(2)
Adult Achievement of Young Academic Achievers
324(3)
The Hunter Group
324(2)
The Hollingworth Group
326(1)
Adult Talent Development by Domain
327(1)
Adult Characteristics of People with Science Talent
328(2)
Adult Research Neurologists
328(2)
Adult Characteristics of People with Mathematics Talent
330(5)
Math Olympians
331(2)
Creative Female Mathematicians
333(2)
Social Science Talent: Creative Women Psychologists
335(2)
Longitudinal Studies of Talented Women
337(2)
Project CHOICE
337(1)
Kerr's Study
338(1)
The Path of Adult Creative Writers
339(3)
The Path of Adult Visual Artists
342(1)
The Path of Adult Musicians and Composers
343(1)
Other Studies of Adults
344(3)
The Importance of Mentors
344(1)
Fulfillment of Potential, Life Satisfaction, and Competence in Women
344
Fulfillment of Potential, Life Satisfaction, and Competence in Men
347
The Blurring of Traditional Gender Lines in Adulthood
345(2)
Counseling Issues for Adults with Talent
347(6)
Divergency
348(1)
Excitability
348(1)
Sensitivity
348(2)
Perceptivity
350(2)
Entelechy
352(1)
Spiritual Growth
352(1)
Case Example: Engineer as High School Teacher
353(3)
Summary
356(1)
PART III CURRICULUM, COUNSELING, AND AT-RISK TALENTED STUDENTS 357(206)
CHAPTER 9 PRECEPTS FOR CURRICULUM FOR THE ACADEMICALLY TALENTED
358(58)
A Definition of Curriculum
363(2)
Precept 1: Base Curriculum on Learning Characteristics of Academically Talented Students in Their Areas of Strength
365(2)
Pace
365(1)
Depth
366(1)
Learning Through Reading
366(1)
Maker's Summary
366(1)
Precept 2: The Curriculum Should Possess Academic Rigor
367(10)
Assessment in the Context of Academic Rigor
367(1)
The "Dumbed-Down" Curriculum
368(1)
What the TIMMS Studies Showed
369(7)
Academic Rigor: Alternative Assessment
376(1)
Precept 3: The Thematic and Interdisciplinary Curriculum
377(3)
Precept 4: Seven Curriculum Orientations
380(19)
a. Curriculum as Personal Relevance
386(1)
b. Curriculum as Technology
387(1)
c. Curriculum as Academic Rationalism
387(6)
d. Curriculum as Social Adaptation and Social Reconstruction
393(1)
e. Curriculum as the Development of Cognitive Processes
394(2)
f. Curriculum as a Means of Producing Insight
396(2)
g. Curriculum Based on Contemporary Postmodern Curriculum Thought
398(1)
Precept Number 5: The Curriculum Should Be Balanced and Articulated
399(3)
General Education and Gifted Education
401(1)
Case Example: A Thought Piece on Postmodern Curriculum
402(13)
Summary
415(1)
CHAPTER 10 CURRICULUM PRACTICES: IN AND OUT OF THE CLASSROOM
416(46)
Principles of Curriculum Development
420(3)
Differentiation as a Result of Different Interests
421(1)
Independent Study as Differentiation
422(1)
Differentiation in Pace
422(1)
Differentiation in Depth
422(1)
Curriculum Practices for Academically Talented Children in the Regular Classroom
423(6)
The Influence of Class Size
424(1)
The Regular Classroom Teacher's Responsibility
424(1)
Not More, But Different
425(2)
Curriculum Compacting
427(2)
Other Curriculum Modifications
429(4)
Content Enrichment Through Novelty and Sophistication
429(2)
Content Acceleration
431(1)
The Tyranny of the Schedule and the Carnegie Unit
432(1)
Differentiating Curriculum Through Teaching Approaches and Techniques: Methods for Teaching All Students
433(13)
Differentiation by Techniques: Questioning According to Bloom's Taxonomy
433(2)
Other Suggestions for Questioning
435(1)
Differentiation by Techniques: Critical Thinking and Socratic Dialogues
436(1)
Differentiating Curriculum Utilizing Creative Thinking
436(5)
Alternative Representations to Meet Expectations
441(1)
Direct Teaching of Creative Thinking
442(1)
Differentiation by Method of Teaching: Problem-Based Learning
442(3)
Constructivism as an Approach to Curriculum
445(1)
Curriculum Outside the Regular Classroom
446(13)
Special Courses for Academically Talented Students
446(1)
Special Elective Courses
446(1)
Special, Out of School Classes
446(1)
Variations Within the Academically Talented Population and Implications for Curriculum
447(1)
Home Schooling as an Option for the Very High-IQ Student
448(1)
Suitable Special Programs for Academically Talented Students
448(10)
Correspondence, Distance Learning, independent Learning, and Online Courses
458(1)
Summary
459(3)
CHAPTER 11 SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING NEEDS OF THE TALENTED
462(60)
Historical Trends in Guidance and Counseling of the Academically Talented
467(1)
Psychosocial and Asynchronous Development
467(3)
Psychosocial Characteristics of Academically Talented Youth
468(1)
Need for Guidance and Counseling of Talented Youth
469(1)
Counseling Issues Among Talented Youth
470(30)
Anger
472(1)
Genuine Boredom
472(1)
Creativity
472(1)
Delinquency
473(1)
Depression
473(1)
Dropping Out of School
474(1)
Gender-Related Issues
474(1)
Very High IQ
478(1)
Introversion
479(1)
Intuition
479(1)
Meeting the Expectations of Others
480(1)
Motivation
481(1)
Overexcitabilities: The Dabrowski Theory and Emotional Intensity
481(2)
Peer Relations
483(1)
Perfectionism and the Talented
484(3)
Overachievement
487(1)
Resiliency and Its Relationship to Achievement
487(2)
Self-Concept/Self Esteem
489(1)
Sexual Identity
491(3)
Underachievement
494(6)
Guidance Issues for Talented Youth
500(12)
Academic Planning
500(2)
Course Taking
502(1)
Acceleration
502(1)
Career Development
503(1)
Finding Mentors
503(1)
Multipotentiality
504(1)
Learning Styles of Talented Youth
505(4)
Testing
509(2)
Program Articulation
511(1)
Vocational Guidance
511(1)
Volunteerism and Service
512(1)
Gender Difference Concerns for Guidance Intervention
512(1)
Gender Differences in Testing
512(1)
The Individual and Group Educational Guidance Plan (IEP)
513(4)
Case Example: Judith Resnik
517(2)
Summary
519(3)
CHAPTER 12 CHILDREN OF THE AMERICAN DREAM: POPULATIONS OF TALENTED CHILDREN WHO NEED SPECIAL ATTENTION
522(41)
Definitions of "At Risk" and the Challenge of Identification
525(6)
The Challenge of Identification
526(1)
Identification
527(4)
Rural Students
531(1)
Students from Low-income Families
532(1)
Urban Students
533(1)
English-Speaking Students from Various Racial Backgrounds
533(15)
African-Americans
533(8)
Suggestions for Identifying African-American Students
541(1)
Factors Necessary for Successful Intervention
541(2)
Magnet Schools
543(1)
Promising Programming Practices
544(1)
American Indians
545(2)
Using Multiple Intelligence Theory for Assessment
547(1)
Students with Limited English Proficiency (LEP)
548(4)
Hispanics (Latinos)
548(2)
Pacific Islanders and Asians: Emerging Minorities
550(2)
Immigrants
552(1)
Students with Physical or Learning Disabilities
552(4)
Learning-Disabled Talented Youth
552(1)
Physically Disabled Talented Children
553(3)
Students from Troubled Family Situations
556(2)
Students Possessing a Combination of Characteristics
558(1)
Case Example: Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Civil Rights Heroine
559(3)
Summary
562(1)
APPENDIX A COMPARISON OF STANDARDIZED TESTS 563(8)
APPENDIX B GIFTED/TALENTED DATA GATHERING QUESTIONNAIRE 571(16)
REFERENCES 587(40)
NAME INDEX 627(8)
SUBJECT INDEX 635

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