Tales from the Dordogne

Tales from the Dordogne

by Rudolph Lea

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781469757988
Publisher: iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date: 02/08/2012
Pages: 272
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.61(d)

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Tales from the Dordogne 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
TopBookReviewers More than 1 year ago
"Imagine rolling over a hill and heading down into one of the most beautiful places on the planet, full of history, amazing architecture and numerous vibrant characters. This is what Rudolph Lea paints in Tales from the Dordogne. I said paint because Lea is a true artist with a pen. I've always heard stories about the French countryside, but it wasn’t until reading this book that I realized how one could be entranced by the area itself. Lea tells the tale of him and his wife arriving from the US and finding the Golden Triangle in France. They then buy a house and live there each summer for over 10 years. Lea writes in the first person about several friends they made and the tales that surround each one. Among them are, Suzette, a beauty that places an ad for a cultured gentleman. Lea goes through the history of her boyfriends and one in particular that had me shocked with the audacity of what he would do to get a seat on a packed train. Lea continues on with more tales of other friends Catherine, Lola and Zoe to name a few, all with their own great stories. Along the way he describes, in a beautiful style, scenery, food, smells and the atmosphere of living in a small picturesque French village. I'll tell you, I wanted to jump on a plane right there to immerse myself into the culture. I would definitely recommend reading Tales from the Dordogne. It transported me to a place where life is cherished and not just lived." TBR-TopBookReviewers
Santosh More than 1 year ago
Tales from the Dordogne by Rudolph Lea is a beautiful novel; it paints the actual world memories of author Rudy from the time when he was on tour with his wife Ruth. This book is a compilation of short-stories written by Rudolph in his lucid and expressive writing, which will captivate reader of any genre as well as from any age group. In the book author Rudolph Lea, describes the natural beauty of Dordogne region from the perspective of a tourist, a guest and a resident. The story mainly focuses on ‘The Peoples’ author and his wife met on their journey, and experience gained from this journey. The Golden Triangle in France is the beauty of nature and material marvels of men’s (human beings) working together. This triangle is not just one of the last places on earth which is relatively unspoiled by today's modernization trend; but it also is one of the last places on earth to have a strong historic presence. By the critical point of view, I loved the description of beauty of Dordogne valley and villages from fourteenth century; but the thing that I simply can’t forget is the characterization of various protagonists. The only point where story lacks is, when it comes to the pace of it. On concluding notes I would say, it’s a good read. When you are too much bombarded with Mystery and Fantasy and what-not and want to take time out, at that time this is the best book which will refresh your mind and will remind you that; life is simple. With that being said this book deserves 4 of 5 stars.
tiffanydavis2 More than 1 year ago
Tales from the Dordogne by Rudolph Lea is a collection of short stories about the author's memories of his travels through France. The author, Rudy, tells stories of all the life experiences that he and his wife Ruth have gone through. The descriptions make you want to be there or see the things that Rudy is telling you about. Though the stories themselves are good, this is not usually something that I would read. I felt that it was too slow, and at times tended to lose me. I liked how descriptive the author was about the areas he had been to or seen. It made it easy for me to picture it myself, or intrigued me enough to look up some of it. If this genre is something you typically read, then I'm sure you will love this book. Just not my typical read.
dcl55 More than 1 year ago
" it is a magical area with beautiful old cities and extreme history." This memoir by author Rudolph Lea is a compilation of short stories or the telling of his memories of some of the people, pets, and places he remembers with pleasure. As I read the book I was curious about the locations, so I found some small maps of the region on the internet and this helped me keep a better idea of the travels and places. When I looked at pictures from this area of France, I could understand why the author feels it is a magical area with beautiful old cities and extreme history. He refers to the places he calls the Golden Triangle Region which includes the area of the Dordogne river of he north edge of the lot , then flowing down southwestward through the Central mountains and then reaches the Department of the lot near Bretenoux, continuing directly west into the Garonne river near Bordeaux. The river finally empties out to the Atlantic Ocean through the Bay of Biscay. Other places and cities of this region are mentioned in his memoirs, such as historical spots of WWI. Rudolph and Ruth Lea, residents of Pennsylvania, USA took a summer trip many years ago to a neglected part of France based on the recommendation of a friend and the reading of a book, Three Rivers of France by Freda White. They spent their first vacation in Martel and St. Céré. They loved the region and felt they would want to live in the region someday. In 1990 a friend joined them in an adventure to co-own a purchased property. During their extended vacations or stays in the home they met many interesting people and enjoyed sampling the wonderful culture and cuisine. I won’t give away spoilers, it is best that you read the memoir for yourself, but the feel of the writing was such that prompted me to cruise the internet and dream of visiting in some of the beautiful medieval cities. As you read you will feel as if you have met some of the characters featured in the book. One of the chapters had me crying....can you guess which one? * The ebook displayed a bit differently when I read it on my laptop and then when I read it on my Kindle Fire. You may have to adjust the font size to compensate for the formatting. Editing for capitalization would be a suggestion for future editions.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
When I initially became interested in this book, I thought it was going to be stories of lore and myth from that particular place in France. However, it isn't that at all. It is more like a couples' experiences living in this beautiful place in nature as well as their bonds with the neighbors living there too. Our narrator, Rudi and his wife, Ruth, seem likeable but Suzette seems to be a snob. I just couldn't shake her comment about the man wasn't good enough for her because he came in on a bus. Perhaps a retired couple looking to travel could appreciate this collection much more but I just couldn't get into to it. It was very boring to me and I really had to push myself to finish it. I love to hear my elderly friends tell me about the "good ole days" of their past because it is like a step back in time. The Kindle version of the book was also full of grammatical errors. I am not one to usually mention this, because everyone makes mistakes, including me. But my main pet peeve was the capitalization errors. There were just so many it got a little confusing. The photos were a nice addition to the book and I did like looking at them. Maybe I need to be older and wiser in my years to really enjoy this collection of memories. Unfortunately, I could not grasp it. In the end I guess it wasn't my cup of tea. That isn't to say it is a bad book, it is not. Many of the characters, including Maud and even their pet Zoe, could be great company but it was hard for me to feel endeared to them in print.