×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Tales of 1001 Nights, Vol. 2
     

Tales of 1001 Nights, Vol. 2

4.0 1
by Renaissance
 
The second volume of Sire Records' retrospective compilation on Renaissance is not as impressive musically as its predecessor, devoted as it is primarily to the lesser of the group's late-'70s repertory. The intelligent thing to have done with this volume would have been to put "Song of Scheherazade" on this volume, which would have shored

Overview

The second volume of Sire Records' retrospective compilation on Renaissance is not as impressive musically as its predecessor, devoted as it is primarily to the lesser of the group's late-'70s repertory. The intelligent thing to have done with this volume would have been to put "Song of Scheherazade" on this volume, which would have shored up its value -- perhaps this would have been an awkward fit, as the disc was to include the 23-minute live version of "Ashes Are Burning," but one or two of the lesser songs that are here might've been sacrificed. As it is, the material is less concise and accessible than that of the preceding volume, though it still has very attractive vocal and piano flourishes, and stunning melodies. There are also a few of what could be considered "offbeat" numbers for the group, most notably the folk-like "Northern Lights," and "Midas Man," on which the dominant instrument for much of the song is Mick Dunford's acoustic guitar rather than John Tout's piano. Much of the music seems more of a reach, however, in terms of subject matter, making this volume more of an acquired taste than its companion, and a choice more appropriate for hardcore fans of the group than those with a casual interest.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/16/1990
Label:
Sire / London/Rhino
UPC:
0075992614320
catalogNumber:
26143

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Renaissance   Primary Artist
Annie Haslam   Vocals,Background Vocals
Jon Camp   Bass,Cello,Vocals,bass pedals
Harry Rabinowitz   Conductor
Terence Sullivan   Percussion,Drums,Vocals
John Tout   Keyboards,Vocals
Michael Dunford   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar,Vocals

Technical Credits

Renaissance   Arranger,Producer
Louis Clark   Orchestral Arrangements
Barry Griffiths   Orchestra Leader
David Hentschel   Producer,Engineer
Richard Hewson   Orchestral Arrangements
Dick Plant   Engineer
Carmine Rubino   Engineer
Margo Chase   Art Direction
David Samuel Barr   Liner Notes

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Tales of 1001 Nights, Vol. 2 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
More than any other band in the progressive/classical movement of the 1970's, Renaissance stayed close to the symphonic stylings of the Romantic composers of the late 19th/early 20th century. They never relied on a "super-jock" instrumental soloist(i.e.Keith Emerson, Steve Howe, Rick Wakeman)and seldom strayed far from acoustic instrumentation. The songs on "Tales of 1001 Nights, Vol. 2" are culled from later studio recordings in this band's regrettably short career.The offerings from the album "Novella" showcase the band's jazzier side, including a nice trumpet solo. The "Song for All Seasons" album is well represented, and Annie Haslam's striking vocals are showcased on the melodically-pleasing "Northern Lights". "Azure d'Or" was much maligned by even the most devoted fan of Renaissance, but "Winter Tree" is a pleasant pop song, reminiscent of 80's synth pop. Finally, there is a 24 minute live version of the elegiac "Ashes are Burning", which builds from Annie's vocals into a tasteful piano solo by John Tout. Jon Camp, one of the most underrated bassists of the period, uses his bass effectively as lead instrument, soloing to a dramatic build that breaks with Mike Dunford's chiming harmonics on the acoustic guitar, bridging into the return of the whole band and the orchestra, and Haslam's final vocal run. It is truly a sublime piece of music. Renaissance was an incredibly talented ensemble and featured one of the loveliest voices in rock music. I still enjoy listening and find their music appreciates with time.