Talk of the Town

Talk of the Town

by Sherrill Bodine
4.1 9

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4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
charmedlife More than 1 year ago
The characters were likable. The story line was engaging and fun. I recommend this book to anyone who likes romance mixed with humor. I plan to order the rest of Sherrill Bodine's novels.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Angela_PT More than 1 year ago
This story has it all, albeit a bit predictable...but we wouldn't read 'romance' novels if we didn't want them to live happily ever after now would we? i love the recipes! what's not great about a fun read that includes recipes, gossip, and of course love!
ReviewYourBook.com More than 1 year ago
Talk of The Town
Sherrill Bodine
Hachette Book Group, Inc, 2008
ISBN: 9780446618588
Reviewed by Kay Ramsey for ReviewYourBook.com, 1/09
4 stars
Romance and recipes, great combination¿
When columnist Rebecca Covington steps on a Senator¿s toes she is demoted to the Home and Food section. Her new boss would like to be in the kitchen cooking with her.
Talk of The Town is an entertaining read, filled with a great plot and interesting characters. Sherrill Bodine added a cup of humor to her recipe for a good read; she even threw in recipes.
momgee More than 1 year ago
Sherrill Bodine was very kind and generous in sending me her new book, Talk of the Town, which is due out in December. Thank you Sherrill, I really enjoyed it!


When Rebecca Covington, 15 year veteran gossip columnist for the Daily Mail in Chicago, finds out she has lost her job to a younger woman, she threatens to sue the paper. It seems the paper has been bought out by an as yet unidentified media mogul. Her boss tells her she will now be working with Kate, editor of the home and food section. This will be tricky because Rebecca hates to cook, doesn¿t even really know how and her oven is broken. Rebecca¿s friend Harry has recently inherited a lot of cookbooks and is willing to help her after Kate tells her she must actually cook a recipe while adapting it to her tastes. What follows is a hilarious episode in Harry¿s new kitchen. Absolute laugh out loud moments.

Rebecca is determined to keep up her image because she feels in no time she will get her old job back. As she tells Kate, ¿her job is her identity, the armor she puts on every day. She needs it back to feel safe.¿ It seems that Rebecca¿s husband had left her for a younger woman, leaving Rebecca with a lot of abandonment issues and fear of commitment.

When Rebecca is invited to a charity function, she spots an absolutely gorgeous man and the sparks fly as the two exchange looks. No stretch of the imagination to know that this is the new owner of the paper, David Sumner. When David tells Rebecca she can put her own spin on the food column, she does it in an innovative and very successful way. While their personal and professional lives progress, it is not always in a smooth fashion. There are a lot of bumps along the way along .

This book has a lot more going for it than just a romance. Although at times, you can turn up the air conditioning because there are some steamy love scenes here! Some ¿chick lit¿ books, I find are vapid without much real content, but not so this one. The plot line is extremely plausible. The characters are very well drawn, especially Rebecca and David. The reader gets to see all facets of their personalities as Bodine makes them come to life on every page. They both have had some triumphs and disappointments in life along with real heartbreak that left themfeeling adrift at times. Both work at learning how to deal with the emotional fallout, finally figuring out what they really want out of life. There are several more subplots involved with some wonderful peripheral characters that will keep the reader interested from the beginning until the very end. This new book from Sherrill Bodine will have you talking for quite a while. I really liked the story. 4****
jjmachshev More than 1 year ago
Reviewed for queuemyreview.com; book release Dec08

Dishy gossip and fabulous recipes. Does that combination grab your attention? What if I throw in a delicious romance? Well, you can get all that and more in Sherrill Bodine¿s first full length contemporary ¿Talk of the Town¿. Once I started this book, I just couldn¿t put it down.

Rebecca has been Chicago¿s Daily Mail gossip queen for fifteen years. Then, new management and a threatened lawsuit results in her dethronement. With two years left on her contract, she is moved to the Home section to write a miniscule Food column. Rebecca may be temporarily down, but she¿s certainly not out. She fully intends to do whatever it takes to get her column back. Then she meets a handsome man who makes her senses trill¿and it¿s her new boss!

It¿s going to be difficult to write about all the things I enjoyed about this novel without giving away too much of the storyline. There are several subplots involving secondary characters, but Bodine is careful not to overwhelm the reader. One of the most enjoyable factors for me personally was the heroine of this story is in her 40s. YES, there is love and romance over 40! Rebecca has suffered the loss of her parents, the loss and damage of an ugly divorce, and now the loss of her job. Each of these losses have injured her sense of self and self-worth; and each time it¿s harder to `bounce back¿. I also liked how the heroine doesn¿t try to play the ageism card even though there is certainly a sense of that when management wants to go in a `younger, sassier, sexier¿ direction. I¿m certain there are more than a few readers who can identify with the heroine¿s feelings on that one! This story even takes on a subplot regarding recurring episodes of depression.

I think this book is mostly about change. There are career changes, relationship changes, and personal changes for most of the primary AND secondary characters. And I think that for many people, change has become something feared past 40. So I appreciate the way Bodine has depicted change in this story. Not all the changes are good¿but then again, that¿s true in real life too. Not all the changes are wanted¿but again, that¿s life. These changes are what makes the tale more realistic and enables readers (at least, THIS reader) to identify even more closely with the heroine.

The contemporary setting is perfect for this story because it just wouldn¿t work any other way. The romance is sweet, sexy, and downright hot, in turns. The hero is conflicted and has a few issues of his own to work out because, hey, he¿s in his late 40s and has lived a lot of life too. There¿s some ups and some downs for most of the characters throughout the story, but the happy ending is worth waiting for. My emotions were engaged, I laughed and cried. I even admired the recipes though I¿m definitely NOT the cook in my family. Put all these things together, and Sherrill Bodine has certainly found a recipe for success in my book with ¿Talk of the Town¿.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Divorcee Rebecca Covington cannot believe that she lost her position as a gossip columnist at the Chicago Daily Mail after fifteen years doing that due to a report she wrote leading to a California senator threatening to sue her and the paper as being false and thus libel. Instead she has been relegated ironically to recipe writer although she cannot boil water without burning it and thinks that a nutritious diet consists of Diet Coke and Kleenex.

Still in spite of her good intentions to be the best home and food section reporter, Rebecca decides to ask the new CEO, David Sumner why he demoted and replaced her with the ultimate insult a Women¿s Page reporter Shannon Forester. However, Rebecca and David are both stunned by the instant attraction each feels for one another that leaves each questioning the true intentions of the other.

Although reporter romances have been done frequently, for instance the Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell screwball romantic comedy His Girl Friday, Sherrill Bodine provides a warm amusing gender war between the spunky reporter and her reticent boss. The story line is fast-paced and very humorous once Rebecca and David meet, fight, and kiss. Fans will enjoy TALK OF THE TOWN (ironically another Grant movie), a throwback screwball romantic comedy.

Harriet Klausner
RegencyReader More than 1 year ago
Always on the cutting edge of excitement Sherrill Bodine never fails to entice you with her story and entertain you with her characters. Her writing style is edgy with a touch of "back off" just a little please. Thanks again for this great book.