Target: Tinos (Chief Inspector Andreas Kaldis Series #4)

Target: Tinos (Chief Inspector Andreas Kaldis Series #4)

by Jeffrey Siger

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781590589786
Publisher: Poisoned Pen Press
Publication date: 06/05/2012
Series: Chief Inspector Andreas Kaldis Series , #4
Pages: 250
Sales rank: 843,202
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

The New York Times described Jeffrey Siger 's novels as "thoughtful police procedurals set in picturesque but not untroubled Greek locales," the Greek Press called his work "prophetic," Eurocrime described him as a "very gifted American author...on a par with other American authors such as Joseph Wambaugh or Ed McBain," and the City of San Francisco awarded him its Certificate of Honor citing that his "acclaimed books have not only explored modern Greek society and its ancient roots but have inspired political change in Greece." An Aegean April is the ninth novel in his Chief Inspector Andreas Kaldis series, following up on his internationally best-selling Murder in Mykonos , Assassins of Athens , Prey on Patmos , Target: Tinos , Mykonos After Midnight , Sons of Sparta , Devil of Delphi , Santorini Caesars , and An Aegean April.

www.jeffreysiger.com

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Target Tinos: An Inspector Kaldis Mystery 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Eide More than 1 year ago
This is Jeff Siger's best book yet! (And, believe me, the others were great.)
Leighton-Gage More than 1 year ago
You may never have heard of the Panagia Evangelista. But, if you haven’t, you’re not Greek. The Panagia Evangelista, a shrine dedicated to the Virgin Mary, is as dear to Greeks as the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Lourdes is to the hearts of the French, or the Basilica at Fatima is to the Portuguese. And within its walls is to be found the most-sacred religious object in the country: a silver-and-gold-encased, gem-studded icon depicting the Virgin Mary as she receives the Annunciation of Christ’s birth from the Archangel Gabriel. More than a million Greek pilgrims flock to see her each year. She is revered throughout the land. And she is the patron saint of Greece. Tinos, where she makes her home, is tiny, with a total area of less than two-hundred square kilometers and a permanent population of less than 10,000 souls. But the island has a long and colorful history. And so does the Megalochari, the Greek people’s unofficial name for the icon. To her are attributed both miraculous powers and a miraculous origin. But I don’t intend to tell you about them here. Why? Because Jeffrey Siger does a splendid job of that in Target: Tinos, his fourth novel to feature the exploits of the head of the Greek Police’s Special Crimes Division, Chief Inspector Andreas Kaldis. And you’d be doing yourself a serious disservice if you elected not to read it. Like Siger’s previous books, this one appeals on a number of levels. First and foremost, it’s a cracking good mystery with great characters to love and hate and with an antagonist you’re unlikely to identify until the very end. But that’s just for openers. Target: Tinos is also a primer on the woes of corruption and immigration as they affect modern Greek society, on the attitudes and comportment of the Greek Orthodox faithful, on the workings of a number of Greek institutions, on social customs connected with Greek marriage, on one of the heroines of Greek history and on a society that worked, in secret, to secure Greek independence from the Turks. Siger has succeeded in weaving these diverse threads, and more, into a fabric that is as rich as a metropolitan archbishop’s ceremonial robes. And yet, somehow, he’s managed to do it without complicating, or slowing-down, the story he has to tell. That’s a neat trick for any author. And one that serves to prove, if further proof was needed, that nobody writes Greece better than Jeffrey Siger. The book kicks-off with a strange double-murder of two gypsies on Tinos. Kaldis flies out by helicopter to investigate. And soon he’s involved in an ingenious plot that may involve the theft of the Megalochari, an act that would heretical to those who adore her, but could be very lucrative for a gang of Albanian bandits. If you’re new to Siger, start with Murder on Mykonos. If you’re not, grab this one. It’s seriously good.
FeatheredQuillBookReviews More than 1 year ago
This book is the forth for this author’s books about the Cyclades Islands in the Aegean Sea, featuring Andreas Kaldis, the head of the Greek Special Crimes Division. The Inspector is called to the Island of Tinos to investigate the remains of two bodies burned beyond recognition, found chained together in a van. They were wrapped in a Greek Flag and a message was left saying “Freedom or Death.” It’s a weird place for anything like this to happen. The Inspector is also in a bind as he is getting married in a few days and wants to sew this crime up so he can concentrate on the big day. When the victims are identified as gypsies, known as Rom in Greece, that seems to be the end of the investigation. These Rom are noted for being criminals and the theories of the crime, according to Greek authorities, is that this might be a war between criminal families or a hate crime. Andreas’ boss, Greece Minister of Order, Spiros Renatis, and his pals let the investigation slide and tell Andreas to close it as the people involved are not high on his list of people the Greek Government care about. Andreas and his sidekicks, Yianni, Kouras and Tassos decide to look into the crime anyway and take the trip to Tinos again to check up on the victims' whereabouts before they were incinerated. The team of detectives gets almost no cooperation from the locals so they have to figure it all out for themselves. There are a couple more murders and some meetings in Athens with the criminal element from Albania who seem to be hip deep in this whole operation. There is a large festival coming up in the town and the detectives feel that there may be a robbery at the Church of Panagia Evangelistria as they have an icon of the Virgin Mary there that many people pray to and leave money and jewels. But the case still drags out. Andreas’ will not give up and it is left up to him and his men to find the killers, find out where the robbery is going to take place and last, but certainly not least, GET MARRIED!! Quill Says: This book is a definite keeper. The descriptive passages about Greece and the Greek Isles had me fascinated as I really am a history buff and this author definitely knows his subject. This book is a gem and is an exciting read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Tedious digressions, an obvious disturbed villain once enough is revealed from a murky text. Side story of hero's marriage takes up far too much of the book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this book because it was on the NY Times summer read list. I am yet to figure out why it was there. It is a run of the mill crime story. Nothing special. Strained dialog. Really a waste of time.
Leighton-Gage More than 1 year ago
You may never have heard of the Panagia Evangelista. But, if you haven’t, you’re not Greek. The Panagia Evangelista, a shrine dedicated to the Virgin Mary, is as dear to Greeks as the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Lourdes is to the hearts of the French, or the Basilica at Fátima is to the Portuguese. And within its walls is to be found the most-sacred religious object in the country: a silver-and-gold-encased, gem-studded icon depicting the Virgin Mary as she receives the Annunciation of Christ’s birth from the Archangel Gabriel. More than a million Greek pilgrims flock to see her each year. She is revered throughout the land. And she is the patron saint of Greece. Tinos, where she makes her home, is tiny, with a total area of less than two-hundred square kilometers and a permanent population of less than 10,000 souls. But the island has a long and colorful history. And so does the Megalochari, the Greek people’s unofficial name for the icon. (It means “Great Grace”). To her are attributed both miraculous powers and a miraculous origin. But I don’t intend to tell you about them here. Why? Because Jeffrey Siger does a splendid job of that in Target: Tinos, his fourth novel to feature the exploits of the head of the Greek Police’s Special Crimes Division, Chief Inspector Andreas Kaldis. And you’d be doing yourself a serious disservice if you elected not to read it. Like Siger’s previous books, this one appeals on a number of levels. First and foremost, it’s a cracking good mystery with great characters to love and hate and with an antagonist you’re unlikely to identify until the very end. But that’s just for openers. Target: Tinos is also a primer on the woes of corruption and immigration as they affect modern Greek society, on the attitudes and comportment of the Greek Orthodox faithful, on the workings of a number of Greek institutions, on social customs connected with Greek marriage, on one of the heroines of Greek history and on a society that worked, in secret, to secure Greek independence from the Turks. Siger has succeeded in weaving these diverse threads, and more, into a fabric that is as rich as a metropolitan archbishop’s ceremonial robes. And yet, somehow, he’s managed to do it without complicating, or slowing-down, the story he has to tell. That’s a neat trick for any author. And one that serves to prove, if further proof was needed, that nobody writes Greece better than Jeffrey Siger. The book kicks-off with a strange double-murder of two gypsies on Tinos. Kaldis flies out by helicopter to investigate. And soon he’s involved in an ingenious plot that may involve the theft of the Megalochari, an act that would heretical to those who adore her, but could be very lucrative for a gang of Albanian bandits. If you’re new to Siger, start with Murder on Mykonos. If you’re not, grab this one. It’s seriously good.
tedfeit0 More than 1 year ago
All the troubles in Greece are reflected in this, the fourth novel in the Chief Inspector Andreas series: prejudice against immigrants, aversion to taxes, repugnance to working at menial jobs for low wages (but it’s ok for immigrants to take the jobs) and, of course, the huge national debt. Many astute asides throughout the novel allude to these current problems. But the main plot has to do with the discovery of the murders of two gypsy brothers, followed by a few more on the island of Tinos. Complicating the excellent police procedural is the fact of the imminent wedding of Andreas. The pressures from his intended and that of the Minister of Justice on Andreas to make the investigation “go away” (for obviously different reasons) do not deter him from doggedly pursuing the matter. Along the way, the reader learns much about the geography and history of the island, especially about the Church of Panagia Evangelistria, the Greek “Vatican” and home of a relic of the Virgin Mary. Such information is fascinating, and the novel is recommended.