Tatiana (Arkady Renko Series #8)

Tatiana (Arkady Renko Series #8)

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Tatiana 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 29 reviews.
wandererDE More than 1 year ago
IMO this author uses a different approach to keep readers coming back for more "Arkady Renko". Instead of relying on a formula of ever increasing and more bizarre butchery and violence, Smith reaches the reader with the characters themselves. Renko's sarcastic humor and utterly noir view of Russia and himself refreshes contact with Arkady. The detailed descriptions of Russia are high appreciated and lend an air of compelling drama to his stories. This is talented character series writing at its best. Instead of becoming ordinary the stories bring the reader back like visiting an old friend. Why no fifth star? I'm brutal. Five stars are an exalted rating, Like for a bottle of 1967 Chateau Haut Brion, the fifth star is an exceptional rating. I'll be purchasing the next Arkady Renko novel.
Sean_From_OHIO More than 1 year ago
You ever hear yourself in a fictional character? I do. Every time I read Arkady Renko's exploits I hear my voice. Which is odd because I am nowhere near a Russian police officer. What Martin Cruz Smith is able to with his series is create a Russia that you both want to visit and avoid. The sarcastic and oft-defeated Renko is perfect for this world. Smith's minimalistic approach is always refreshing but at the same time I want to read more. I always I wholeheartedly enjoyed this but just wished for a longer adventure.
Andrew_of_Dunedin More than 1 year ago
“Tatiana”, the 8th appearance of Russian investigator Arkady Renko, shows that Martin Cruz Smith is still on his game and still has something to say about the world's largest country through the eyes and experiences of this character.   This novel shows glimpses into the current situation between the government and dissenters, the importance of chess, the opening of formerly “closed” cities, and the current state of organized crime in the former Soviet Union – both outside and inside of official channels.  As usual, this Renko novel is very much dependent on its location; it would require extensive rewrites to shift this novel to any other country. This novel ALSO carries on an unfortunate trend, in that the author had more to say about the government in the former Soviet Union than he does about what Russia has currently evolved to.  This is mild criticism, as those early works were absolutely wonderful in my opinion, while the follow-ups have been merely – MERELY – very, very good.  (Smith's “bad days” at the word processor are still much better than most people's “genius” periods!) In my opinion, this novel left some subplots dangling.  Let's start off with “Piggy” (readers will learn who this is in the prologue).  Smith treats him as a minor character, who shows up on a few occasions to provide major advances to plot.  In my opinion, “Piggy” should have been fleshed out and given not just a subplot BUT a parallel main plot to the one that is described in the novel.  Secondly, Anya.  Smith paints a  very interesting (and effective) verbal portrait in her last meeting with Renko … then totally forgets that she exists.  I was waiting for closure; two days after finishing the novel, I'm still waiting. I'm going to grade on a curve.  Normally, a work like this would rate a solid 4 stars, if not higher.  However, as Smith has shown he's capable of much more, I'm not going to be as generous. RATING: 3 ½ stars, rounded down to 3 stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Having read the entire series, i can say that the last two books seem as if they were written by someone else. The first 10 or so chapters engaged me enough to suffer through to the end. After that the last two books follow a similar course, a path that the first six thankfully escaped. The plots become silly. The dialogue becomes sophmoric. And character motivation and development infantile. There is simply no way that the second halves of the last two books were written by Smith. Smith should not have let his good name get tarnished by these two travesties, and the publisher should.have known better as well.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Smith has run out of steam with Arkady. Writing is wooden, plot not believable and way too many characters with superficial development.
glauver More than 1 year ago
Tatiana is a partial return to form after the last two depressing novels in the Arkady Renko series. I would not rank it with Gorky Park, Polar Star, and Red Square, the opening trilogy of the series, but it is at least interesting and kept me turning pages. Hanging the plot on the murder of a journalist ties the book to Russian reality today. Without giving anything away, the story ends on a relatively happy note compared to Three Stations, the last book. This might be a good time for Martin Cruz Smith to send his battered hero to join Sam Spade, Philip Marlowe, Lew Archer, and George Smiley in detective and spy Valhalla.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like the author and have read two other of his books
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Would have told me enough to avoid another two bucks archieved deeply unpleasant
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
tedfeit0 More than 1 year ago
As is his custom, Moscow investigator Arkady Renko butts in when a woman plunges to her death from her upstairs apartment. He is told she was a famous crusading journalist (something hard to believe in Russia, now or in the past) and it sets him off on an investigation that takes him to a place on the Baltic Sea very few of us even know exists. A map shows Kaliningrad as part of Russian territory south of Lithuania where there is a naval base. Renko becomes obsessed with the dead woman and eventually learns of corruption involving the Russian mafia, government officials and others (so what else is new?). It seems that a translator who attended a high level conference in Kaliningrad who had kept a notebook is also murdered, and his notes, written in an undecipherable manner, come into Renko’s possession. Unfortunately, he can’t understand anything in the notebook which would unveil the plot. Written in a tight and smooth manner, the novel flows from beginning to end. More than in past Renko novels, the story delves more deeply into present day Russia, its politics, business practices and corruption. It is a welcome addition to the series and is recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thin,disjointed plot. Poor character development. I don't know why I bothered to finish it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MedPhys More than 1 year ago
Good series
Midwesterner2 More than 1 year ago
I'M SO GLAD ARKADY IS BACK! RUSSIA NOIR LIVES!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ElizMcGinnis More than 1 year ago
If you have read the other Arkady Renko books you will love this one. I have read all of them and this is the best one yet. It is fast paced with a surprise on practically every page. It was difficult to put down until I read the whole thing. Arkady Renko is a fascinating personality and this book would easil create a lively book club discussion.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting characters and evocative scenery.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Martin Cruz Smith is a wonderful writer. His Russian detective Arkady Renko is truly engaging with a relentless desire for truth and justice in a corrupt new world of Russia. This is a must read for anyone that loves great detectives, and interested in the world after the Soviet Union. This would be a fun read for a book club that loves a good detective story and contemporary history.
chuckCR More than 1 year ago
not one of his better efforts