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Taylor Made
     

Taylor Made

5.0 3
by Sherryle Kiser Jackson
 

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Pamela "Pill" Jones was raised in poverty by her older sister and always craved "the good life." Today she's a successful hairstylist, but she and her husband Corey's income doesn't cover all the material goods she buys, and they soon find themselves struggling to climb out of deep debt. As Corey bears the brunt of their money problems, Pill just keeps spending.

Overview

Pamela "Pill" Jones was raised in poverty by her older sister and always craved "the good life." Today she's a successful hairstylist, but she and her husband Corey's income doesn't cover all the material goods she buys, and they soon find themselves struggling to climb out of deep debt. As Corey bears the brunt of their money problems, Pill just keeps spending. Now Corey's feeling strained and he can't deal. He's also trying to figure out who he is, but all he sees in front of them are issues, with no end in sight. He asks Pill to join him for Marriage Maintenance classes and hopes with a little faith they can get their marriage back on track. But will Pill get on board—even if it means "going without" again?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781601627957
Publisher:
Kensington
Publication date:
08/01/2011
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.00(d)

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Taylor Made 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
OOSABookClub More than 1 year ago
As a kid, Pamela “Pill” Jones didn’t have a normal family structure. With an absentee mother, she was raised by her older sister. Instead of nurturing, there was usually a lot of overcompensating. She vowed to always have everything, regardless of the cost, that she wanted. A shopaholic, swimming in debt, Pill doesn’t realize that her shopping expenditures are wrecking her marriage. A sweetheart, Corey Taylor doesn’t know what it’s like to struggle or have to steal the things you want. Pill looks at his wealthy family and because he’s always had, she feels she can’t explain her past to him without judgment. They’ve only been married six months and they have long left the honeymoon phase. The two find themselves in battle after battle about money, intimacy and the past. Enrolled in their church’s Marriage Maintenance class, Pill and Corey soon find themselves in one-on-one counseling with their first lady. Is their marriage doomed? Or will they be able to heal, forgive and trust? “Taylor Made” written by Sherryle Kiser Jackson is an awesome read! I was in love from page one. Engrossing is the way the story deals with marriage, introduces God, healthy natural hair, the importance of finances, love, family and forgiveness. I also appreciate that the lessons are lessons that can be used to assist in your own marriage. Readers who’ve enjoyed “Taylor Made” should also check out “Wife 101” by A’ndrea Wilson, as both books deal with classes on before and after marriage. This is definitely a book that I can see recommending to others and I’m looking forward to reading more from this author soon. I LOVE THIS BOOK! Reviewed by: Crystal
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
'Taylor Made' personifies a Christian couple struggling to survive their first year of marriage in a secular world. Sherryle Kiser Jackson creates the main characters Pamela and Corey Taylor with multidimensionality and sass, like the characters Savannah, Bernadine, Robin, and Gloria in 'Waiting to Exhale' and then 15 years later in 'Getting to Happy' by Terry McMillan. Jackson takes you through a range of emotion where you will hold your breath; you will exhale and get to a happy place, in a 'Taylor Made' fashion. Shopping to Pamela is like heroine to a fiend—a habit her salary as a hair stylist can’t support; a habit her husband Corey is tired of supporting. As the power struggle ensues, Pamela refuses his many sexual advances during the infancy of their marriage and pushes Corey further away. Because of her trip-like ways, she earns the nickname, "Pill" from her mother. But as Pill contemplates her next shopping fix, Corey looks to a female co-worker as medication for his marriage blues. Marriage Maintenance class at their church becomes the initial dose of healing where they learn communication skills alongside other couples. Corey and Pill need a little more assistance, so their church offers a cure--individual couple therapy with First Lady Rawls, a familiar character we first meet in Jackson's debut novel, 'Soon and Very Soon.' There, they accept individual responsibility for the state of their marriage and First Lady Rawls subtly poses the Shakespearean question, “What’s in a name?” to Pill, causing her to embrace the positive connotation of her birth name, Pamela. Jackson manages to entertain and educate. Her writing experience and craft are evident in the memorable character development of Corey and Pamela. 'Taylor Made' is a novel that will stand the test of time, is a Christian relationship couples’ manual, is perfect for book club discussions —is a must read! Reviewed by: Patricia Biela, an editor of Broke on Ice by Tony Medina
RWA_Bookclub More than 1 year ago
Pamela "Pill" Taylor has come a long way from the struggling streets that surround the hood she was raised in. Still, it seems that no matter how much success she sees, nothing is enough. While she does not indulge in many carnal things, her addiction to shopping is enough to dig a hole so deep that her own husband is contemplates whether he will even save her. Never mind that he feels lost in the wind of her retail receipts plus the fact that there is another big area where their marriage is lacking. Sherryle Kiser Jackson has written another Christian Fiction book that readers of any genre can read, be entertained and relate. The joy in reading her books is that she has a crafty way of intertwining morals without coming off as preachy. And even in that, she gets the word through. Readers will find something about themselves that will have them looking inward. There is at least one scenario that is relatable in this book, if not all. For married couples who don't believe in counseling, this is a great book to read and get indirect therapy. The subject matter is very real, honest, and yes, Christians go through this too! I loved it! Reviewed by: Nikkea Smithers RWA Bookclub President