Teaching Engineering, Second Edition

Teaching Engineering, Second Edition

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Overview

Teaching Engineering, Second Edition by Phillip C. Wankat

The majority of professors have never had a formal course in education, and the most common method for learning how to teach is on-the-job training. This represents a challenge for disciplines with ever more complex subject matter, and a lost opportunity when new active learning approaches to education are yielding dramatic improvements in student learning and retention. This book aims to cover all aspects of teaching engineering and other technical subjects. It presents both practical matters and educational theories in a format useful for both new and experienced teachers. It is organized to start with specific, practical teaching applications and then leads to psychological and educational theories. The "practical orientation" section explains how to develop objectives and then use them to enhance student learning, and the "theoretical orientation" section discusses the theoretical basis for learning/teaching and its impact on students. Written mainly for PhD students and professors in all areas of engineering, the book may be used as a text for graduate-level classes and professional workshops or by professionals who wish to read it on their own. Although the focus is engineering education, most of this book will be useful to teachers in other disciplines. Teaching is a complex human activity, so it is impossible to develop a formula that guarantees it will be excellent. However, the methods in this book will help all professors become good teachers while spending less time preparing for the classroom. This is a new edition of the well-received volume published by McGraw-Hill in 1993. It includes an entirely revised section on the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) and new sections on the characteristics of great teachers, different active learning methods, the application of technology in the classroom (from clickers to intelligent tutorial systems), and how people learn.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781612493626
Publisher: Purdue University Press
Publication date: 01/15/2015
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 450
Sales rank: 1,096,709
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Phillip C. Wankat is the Clifton L. Lovell Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering and Engineering Education at Purdue University. He is interested in separation processes and in improving engineering education. His current research in separation processes focuses on large-scale chromatography and simulated moving bed systems, distillation, and analysis of the engineering education research literature.

Table of Contents

Preface To The Second Edition, 2015 ix

Preface To The First Edition, 1993 xi

Chapter 1 Introduction: Teaching Engineering 1

1.1 Summary and Objectives 1

1.2 Why Teach Teaching Now? 1

1.3 The Components of Good Teaching 7

1.4 Philosophical Approach 9

1.5 What Works: A Compendium of Learning Principles 9

1.6 Effectiveness of Teaching Courses and Workshops 11

1.7 Characteristics of Great Teachers 12

1.8 Chapter Comments 13

Chapter 2 Efficiency 17

2.1 Summary and Objectives 17

2.2 Goals and Activities 17

2.3 Priorities and To-Do Lists 19

2.4 Work Habits 21

2.5 Travel 25

2.6 Teaching Efficiency 27

2.7 Research Efficiency 29

2.8 Handling Stress 30

2.9 Limitations 32

2.10 Chapter Comments 33

Appendix. The Rational-Emotive Behavioral Therapy Approach 36

Chapter 3 Designing Your First Class 39

3.1 Summary and objectives 39

3.2 Types of Courses 40

3.3 Before the Course Starts 41

3.4 The First Class 44

3.5 The Second Class 47

3.6 The Rest of the Semester 48

3.7 The New Faculty Member Experience 50

3.8 Chapter Comments 51

Chapter 4 Objectives, Textbooks, And Accreditation 55

4.1 Summary and Objetives 55

4.2 Course Goals and Objectives 55

4.3 Taxonomies or Domains of Knowledge 57

4.4 The Interaction of Teaching Styles and Objectives 59

4.5 Developing the Content of the Course 61

4.6 Texbooks 62

4.7 Accreditation of Undergraduate Programs 68

4.8 Curriculum Development Case Study 73

4.9 Chapter Comments 78

Appendix. Sample Rubrics for ABET Professional Outcomes 83

Chapter 5 Problem Solving and Creativity 93

5.1 Summary and Objectives 93

5.2 Problem Solving: An Overview 94

5.3 Novice and Expert Problem Solvers 95

5.4 Problem-Solving Strategies 97

5.5 Getting Started or Getting Unstuck 101

5.6 Teaching Problem Solving 103

5.7 Creativity 105

5.8 Chapter Comments 111

Chapter 6 Lectures 117

6.1 Summary and Objectives 117

6.2 Advantages and Disadvantages of Lectures 118

6.3 Content Selection and Organization 120

6.4 Performance 122

6.5 Questions 128

6.6 Building Interpersonal Rapport in Lectures 132

6.7 Special Lecture Methods 134

6.8 Handling Large Classes 137

6.9 Lectures as Part of a Course 139

6.10 Chapter Comments 140

Chapter 7 Active Learning 145

7.1 Summary and Objectives 147

7.2 The Flipped Classroom 147

7.3 Discussion 149

7.4 Cooperative Group Learning 154

7.5 Problem-Based Learning (PBL) 161

7.6 Other Group Methods for Involving Students 162

7.7 Mastery and Self-Paced Instruction 166

7.8 Independent Study Classes: Increasing Curriculum Flexibility 172

7.9 Field Trips and Visits 173

7.10 Service Learning 174

7.11 Tiny Classes 176

7.12 Making the Change to Active Learning Work 177

7.13 Chapter Comments 179

Chapter 8 Teaching With Technology 185

8.1 Summary and Objectives 187

8.2 Television and Video 188

8.3 Computers in Engineering Education 197

8.4 Computer Calculation Tools 198

8.5 Simulations and Games 200

8.6 YouTube and Wikis 203

8.7 Computer-aided Instruction and Intelligent Tutorial Systems 204

8.8 Chapter Comments 207

Chapter 9 Design And Laboratory 213

9.1 Summary and Objectives 213

9.2 Design 214

9.3 Laboratory Courses 227

9.4 Chapter Comments 233

Chapter 10 One-To-One Teaching and Advising 239

10.1 Summary and Objective 239

10.2 Listening Skills 240

10.3 Tutoring and Helping Students 243

10.4 Advising and Counseling 251

10.5 Research Advisers 258

10.6 Chapter Comments 264

Chapter 11 Testing, Homework, And Grading 267

11.1 Summary and Objectives 268

11.2 Testing 268

11.3 Scoring 275

11.4 Homework 280

11.5 Projects 284

11.6 Grading 285

11.7 Grade Scales 289

11.8 Chapter Comments 289

Appendix. Computation of Grades for Different Systems 293

Chapter 12 Student Cheating, Discipline, And Ethics 297

12.1 Summary and Objectives 297

12.2 Cheating 297

12.3 Classroom Incivility and Other Discipline Problems 302

12.4 Teaching Ethics 301

12.5 Chapter Comments 307

Chapter 13 Psychological Type and Learning 311

13.1 Summary and Objectives 312

13.2 From Jung to the MBTI 312

13.3 Psychological Type 313

13.4 Applications of the MBTI in Engineering Education 318

13.5 Difficulties with Psychological Testing 324

13.6 MBTI Model for Problem Solving 325

13.7 Conclusions 326

13.8 Chapter Comments 327

Chapter 14 Models of Cognitive Development: Piaget and Perry 331

14.1 Summary and Objectives 331

14.2 Piaget's Theory 332

14.3 Perry's Theory of Development of College Students 338

14.4 Chapter Comments 352

Chapter 15 Learning Theories 357

15.1 Summary and Objectives 357

15.2 Constructivism and the Scientific Learning Cycle 358

15.3 Learning and Teaching Styles 362

15.4 Kolb's Learning Cycle and Learning Styles 369

15.5 How People Learn 374

15.6 Motivation 377

15.7 Chapter Comments 385

Chapter 16 Evaluation of Teaching 391

16.1 Summary and Objectives 392

16.2 Formative and Summative Evaluations 392

16.3 Student Evaluation Methods 394

16.4 Student Evaluations: Reliability, Validity, and Extraneous Variables 396

16.5 Other Evaluation Procedures 402

16.6 Teaching Improvement 405

16.7 Chapter Comments 406

Chapter 17 Professional Concerns 409

17.1 Summary and Objectives 409

17.2 Faculty Time 409

17.3 Promotion and Tenure 411

17.4 Faculty Environment 420

17.5 Faculty Development 427

17.6 Professional Ethics 430

17.7 Guideposts for Engineering Education (Hougen's Principles) 432

17.8 Chapter Comments 434

Appendix A Obtaining An Academic Position 441

Appendix B Teaching Engineering Course 449

Bl Sample Course Oudine 449

B2 Sample Course Assignments 451

B3 Sample Course Syllabus 453

Name Index 457

Subject Index 469

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