The Teashop Girls

The Teashop Girls

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Overview

The Official Rules of the Teashop Girls

1. Teashop girls are best friends forever.
2. Tea is held every week, no matter what.
3. All tea and scones must be split equally at all times.

Annie, Genna, and Zoe have been hanging out at the Steeping Leaf since elementary school. The Teashop Girls do everything together — at least they used to. With the end of eighth grade approaching, Genna's too busy with theater, Zoe's always at tennis, and Annie feels totally left out. What happened to tea every week, no matter what?

When Annie convinces her grandmother to give her a job as a barista at the Leaf, things begin to look up. In between whipping up chai lattes for customers, and attempting to catch the attention of her Barista Boy crush, Annie is finally beginning to feel as grown-up as her best friends. But an eviction notice spells trouble for the Leaf and unless they can turn the business around, the teashop will have to close its doors forever.

Fresh, honest, and sweet, Laura Schaefer's debut novel is sure to resonate with readers everywhere.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781416967941
Publisher: Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books
Publication date: 12/22/2009
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 272
Product dimensions: 5.56(w) x 8.22(h) x 0.68(d)
Lexile: 710L (what's this?)
Age Range: 9 - 13 Years

About the Author

Laura Schaefer is the author of The Teashop Girls, The Secret Ingredient, and Littler Women. She lives in Orlando, Florida, with her husband and daughter. When she’s not writing middle grade novels, you might find her scoping out local coffee shops, taking long walks with only partially working headphones, and poking around the library for treasures. Laura’s favorite Little Women character is Jo (whose isn’t?), but she confesses to a strong fondness for Amy as well. Visit her online at LauraSchaeferWriter.com or follow her on Twitter at @TeaShopGirl.

Sujean Rim is an illustrator whose work is often seen on DailyCandy. She lives in New York City.

Read an Excerpt

The Teashop girls Chapter One


“My dear if you could give me a cup of tea to clear my muddle of a head I should better understand your affairs.”

—CHARLES DICKENS, MRS. LIRRIPER’S LEGACY

There’s a right way and a wrong way to do many things, and when it comes to tea, my opinion is one should not mess around. My grandmother Louisa first taught me to brew a fine pot of tea when I was five years old. She told me what a nice job I had done, and I announced I wanted to be just like her when I grew up. Louisa laughed merrily at the time. I hoped she wouldn’t laugh today. I couldn’t bear the thought of being laughed at today, which is why I, Annie Green, am hiding out in the storage room of the Steeping Leaf.

Well, not hiding exactly. That would be silly. I love the Leaf, and there isn’t anything out there to hide from, least of all my grandmother Louisa. But the fact of the matter is I am here in her teashop, she doesn’t know it yet, and the reason for all my sneaking around is I need to psych myself up for what I am about to do.

You know how some people have weird/cool talents, like being able to wiggle their ears back and forth just by concentrating really hard? Well, I have one too. I can stand on my head forever. Like, seriously forever. My two brothers can even try to tickle my feet to knock me over, and I just make faces at them, upside down, secure in the knowledge that I am just as steady on my head as they are on their feet. Which isn’t, come to think of it, as steady as, say, Louisa is on her feet, but it’s pretty darn good. And as a bonus, when I stand on my head, I can feel myself getting smarter and calmer. I think it has something to do with the fact that a headstand is a real yoga pose.

With two younger brothers and an older sister, it’s hard to ever find even half a moment alone. And the silence of the storage room is blissful. It’s just me, upside down and Zenlike amidst a few dozen boxes of loose tea, some old teacups Louisa hasn’t taken to St. Vinny’s yet, and my “Perfect Cup of Tea Instructions,” which I’ve written on a whiteboard that, for readability’s sake, has also assumed the sirsha-asana pose.

I am almost ready to ask for a job here as a barista. And when I do, I will be calm, centered, grown-up, and only slightly red in the face. I am a tiny bit worried because sometimes my family doesn’t take me seriously. Everyone else in my family already has their “thing”—Beth is all “college, college, college ... did I mention that I’m going away to college in the fall?” and Luke and Billy have the lock on the local emergency room—skateboarders, it’s like they have a death wish or something. My mom has her students, and my dad has his engineering projects. And I have tea.

Okay, I’ll admit, I’m interested in a lot of things and I tend to announce my newest obsessions rather frequently—but working at the Leaf is not just a phase. I’ve always loved the Leaf and confess that I consider it partly, well, mine. Am I ready to be a barista, taking money, making complex foamy drinks, and asking after the customers’ families like the perfect hostess? I think so. I hope Louisa does, too.

Still staring at the board and mentally picturing each and every step of brewing a pot of tea, I sighed happily and closed my eyes to fully commune with the delicious smells of the shop. Inhale. Exhale. “I am one with the tea. The tea is one with me. I am one with the t—”

The storage door banged and there was some commotion. My eyes snapped open, but all I could see was a pair of legs in jeans. And a box. A really big box. A really big box coming straight at me. “Hey, watch out!”

Instead of changing course however, the startled jeans-wearer swung the box around. Right into me. “AUGHH!” he cried, tripping a little and juggling the box. It was definitely a he, I thought as I tumbled over, directly into a precarious stack of napkins, tea samples, and the shelf with the old cups. CRASH! went one cup. Then, CRASH! CRASH! CRASH! came three more. Ouch.

The napkins flew everywhere, and some of the samples burst open, sending leaves and particles of rosehips, chamomile, orange spice, and white tea every which way. I stared at the intruder from the corner where I was sprawled out, confused. I thought Louisa was the only one who ever came in here. Well, and me, of course. CRASH! One more cup slid to the ground.

The intruder set his box down veeery slowly and righted the shelf I had tipped. I was just about to sputter something extremely non-Zenlike when the words got tangled up in my tongue. My scowl fully retreated as my eyes widened. Why hadn’t I seen him before? It occurred to me that most girls could go a whole life time of seeing strange boys in teashops (grocery stores, movie theaters, stadiums ... you get the idea) and not lay eyes on someone so perfectly gorgeous.

“What were you do ing?” he asked, offering me a hand up. I took it slowly, my stomach flipping.

“I ... I ...” Apparently, I could no longer speak. Great.

He cocked his head expectantly. I stared. And stared. And stared. Finally I said the first and best thing that came to mind. “I was standing on my head. I do that.”

I do that. Wow. Smooth. I could feel my face reddening.

“Oh.” He looked at me as if I were some amusing—yet potentially deranged—creature from another planet. “Why?”

I didn’t get the chance to reply because the door to the main shop opened again and Louisa came hurrying into the room, her scarves flowing luxuriantly behind her.

“What on earth? Is everything all right? Annie, my sweetness! What are you doing here?”

Just when you think your face can’t get any redder, know this:

It can.

Customer Reviews

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The Teashop Girls 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 40 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book it is full of unexpected twists and turns all the way until the end! Recomended for anyone age 10 to age 100!
Anna Sweeney More than 1 year ago
I love the book: the teashop girls! It is one of those everyone books, a book that has fiction, action, friendship, a tad of mystery, and just a sprinkle on love. A must read for tweens. I devoured every page of this book. It makes your heart feel warm and fuzzy! : )
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ok so this book was really good, but some parts were a little questionable. Like when the girls have a fight i noticed a couple of grammer errors. Was this on purpose????? Over all though it was a good book. Im looking forward to the next one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved this book and the second
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Annie and her two BFFs, Genna and Zoe, used to hang out at her grandmother's tea shop. Now, with the end of 8th grade drawing near, the friends are pulled in different directions. Once nicknamed the Teashop girls, each has her own direction. Zoe's focused on tennis. Genna's focused on acting. Annie becomes focused on the shop once again. She asks her grandmother for a job as a barista. Annie soaks up the atmosphere. She loves her job, especially as she gets to flirt with her cute co-worker. Before long, she realizes the Steeping Leaf is in trouble - big trouble. Annie's grandmother might be in danger of closing her shop. Annie vows not to let that happen, and attempts to rally her friends and the neighborhood together to save the shop. Will their efforts be enough to save the Steeping Leaf? A cute book about three girls trying to save their friendship as they grow older and grow apart. The illustrations and tea quotes and facts add to the book's charm. I can't wait to see where the story goes next.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I recomend this for kids who like to here to sides of a story and love twist and turns. I am a fourth grader and i read book one and two, this is a book for middle schoolars but still kids like me can still read it. Thank you for your time, CLAUDIA
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love it : )
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is great i love it and cant wait to read others the auther is great please keep coming up with more books like this!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Laura Schaefer is a wonderful author! This book is in a girl's language. It sounds exactly like me and my friends talking, thinking and chatting. The Teashop GirlsT especially meant a lot to me because it takes place in Madison, WI, where I live. I was able to recall every store or restaurant they mentioned. It was so cool! The only other books they've done that for me are some of Kevin Henkes novels. This is a good book for wide age group. The ages are probabaly 9-13. It might mean more to older child though. As an 11 yr. old I loved it! I highly recommend it! I rated it a four star but that was only because I've read A LOT of good books in my lifetime! It is also a great book for a Mother-Daughter book club. I read it with my Mother-Daughter book club! Please read this book!
lindamamak on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If you are a Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants fan. You will like this story of girl friendship as they move from middle school to high school
krissa on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. It was so refreshing. With all the dystopian and vampire stories that are out there (I have read quite a few myself, not dissing nothin`!), it is nice to have a sweet plot line. I like the writing, because it is set at an age that could come across as very whiny, angst-y and self absorbed. And although she had typical teen stuff to deal with, it never felt that way. It is set at an age where you feel like you can take on the world, and that came across very well.A thought came up as I was reading. Do groups of 3 friends every really work, in life. My experience is no (at least as teenagers). Inevitably it ends up two against one, and things fall apart. It was nice to see it working here, even if it was a book.I found the ending a little ideal, but lovely. And you know what? This was the kind of story that it works well for. It was very satisfying in this case.It also reminded me, once again, how much more kids do, and have to deal with now. School, jobs, activities, family responsibility, and still have time for some down time, maybe even a relationship. I guess we had all those things, but for some reason it seems like so much more now. Hmmm, wonder if it¿s the times or an age thing?Anyhow, I will be recommending this book to people, and will definitely be searching out more by this author in the future.
bermudaonion on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When Annie, Zoe and Genna were younger they declared themselves ¿The Teashop Girls¿ and vowed to be friends forever. Now that they¿re in the eighth grade, they seem to drifting apart. Annie gets a job at her grandmother¿s teashop, The Steeping Leaf and discovers it¿s having financial difficulties and may have to close. Annie is heartbroken and calls The Teashop Girls together so they can come up with a plan of action to save the teashop, but is it too little, too late?The Teashop Girls by Laura Schaefer is geared for girls 8 to 14, but I absolutely loved it. I¿m not much of a tea drinker but I kept wishing I had a cup of it while I was reading the book. I could really relate to the character of Annie and would love to have a granddaughter like her (years from now). The world is changing and everyone is growing up and Annie¿s not sure she likes it. She¿s embarrassed by her dad at times, annoyed by her siblings, full of self-doubt and fights with her friend, yet she is so sweet, caring, determined and down to earth.Besides the story, this book has reproductions of ads, recipes, lists, beauty tips and drawings - all related to tea. All of these little details enhanced the book for me. Sujean Rim¿s drawings are fantastic. The Teashop Girls is one of the sweetest books I¿ve read in a long time and I highly recommend it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is so good you have to read it!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a very good book. I strongly recomend it for middle schoolers
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is great i reccomend it for girls ages 10 to 15. its a great story and i couldnt put it down. Cant wait to read the 2nd book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A couple days ago I went to Barnes and Noble with my nook and used the Read In Store feature to read this book. I read a few chapters and was instantly hooked. However, I had to leave. Later that day I searched and found out the my library (and every other library in my county) didn't have it. Is there any other way to get it free? P.S I pictured Annie as Bella Thorne. :)
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:)
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