Technimanagement: Empowering the Organization by Liberating Your People

Technimanagement: Empowering the Organization by Liberating Your People

by David B. Brown

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Overview

Technimanagement: Empowering the Organization by Liberating Your People by David B. Brown

Successful management techniques for the technical organization. Technical organizations are different, and anyone who tries to manage them without understanding those differences will fail. Most managers will need to change not just their own approach, but their entire organization's. Here's the good news: the necessary techniques are grounded firmly in human nature, and it is possible to build a technical environment that's not only productive but also healthy and enjoyable. In Technimanagement, Brown synthesizes the best thinking in technical management, and shows what works and what doesn't in Theory Y, Theory X, The Peter Principle, TQM, Deming's 14 Obligations of Management, and other approaches. Best of all, Brown outlines a step-by-step transition strategy that offers immediate payoffs and leads to long-term change that's more than skin deep. Managers of technical organizations.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780131808119
Publisher: Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
Publication date: 08/28/1997
Series: Prentice Hall International Series in Industrial and Systems Engineering
Edition description: FACSIMILE
Pages: 399
Product dimensions: 7.31(w) x 9.58(h) x 0.85(d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE: Criticism from employers of engineers and scientists rarely focuses on technical deficiencies. Invariably it is the lack of "human skills" that causes their concern. Technimanagement provides scientists, engineers, and other professionals with an understanding of basic principles of human nature as they apply to managing organizations of professionals. It is directed primarily toward those who have been out in the workplace for a few years and are facing their first management challenges. However, the principles apply generally, and specific approaches are given for applying these principles at middle and upper management levels as well.

Technically trained people are usually the ones chosen to manage technically trained people. Since these managers have spent most of their academic and work careers dealing with technical as opposed to people problems, they are ill-equipped to handle the interpersonal relationships of management. Thus it would seem that a compilation of principles with regard to human skills in management would provide the solutions or so I thought.

But as I synthesized the principles of management that are currently bearing fruit in our nation's "quality movement," I recognized that the simple synergism which enables a beehive to produce honey is woefully lacking in most contemporary organizations. Its emergence requires much more than the indoctrination of a few of our organizational "bees." The problem is a holistic one, and it cannot be addressed merely by training (or retraining) a subset of the organization's members. For, once they are absorbed back into the organization they regress to organizational consistency.

Thisled to a major premise that defines the goals of technimanagement. The increased productivity of technical organizations requires a major transition wherein the entire management structure itself undergoes constant and adaptive improvement. This premise has not been accepted by traditional management because it requires protracted meta-control efforts over a long period of time. It cannot be brought about merely by sending everyone off to a three-day training course.

The progress made in our transportation, power, communication, and computer systems has taken decades to evolve. Can we expect the human aspects of our organizations to change overnight? Should we throw up our hands because there is no quick fix?

There is hope! The reason that our physical systems have evolved so effectively is the immediate benefit that was produced as each new component was integrated into the rest of the system. Similarly, there are immediate benefits that will s upport and nurture the transition of our management approaches the immediate productivity increases that come from the empowered organization.

Empowerment can occur only when a manager possesses the courage to act on an accurate perception of reality as it applies to people and their interactions within organizations. This can be attained independently at the lowest levels even within the most traditional of organizations. However, our most progressive managers are recognizing and applying the principles throughout their organizations now!

It is here that the greatest hope lies. For when the productivity of these organizations becomes clear, there will be no turning back to traditional management approaches. This will not be tolerated by managers who are reaping the rewards of increased productivity. (Listen to them!). But, more important, turning back will not be tolerated by the other members of the organization, who are having so much fun while being so productive.

Table of Contents

Why Technimanagement?
Elements of Control.
Theory of Rewards.
McGregor's Theories X and Y
Principle of Authority.
Management by Exception.
Management by Objectives.
Optimization, Equifinality, Systems View.
Parkinson's Law.
The Peter Principle.
The "Paradigm" Problem.
Informal Organizations.
Organizational Entropy.
Group Dynamics.
Total Quality Management.
The Clinical Approach.
Principles of Functional Conflict.
Resolution of Personal Conflicts.
Individual Entropy (Use of Power)
Negative Feedback Principle.
Leadership.
Limitations of Experts.
Principles of Communication.
The Transition.

Preface

PREFACE: Criticism from employers of engineers and scientists rarely focuses on technical deficiencies. Invariably it is the lack of "human skills" that causes their concern. Technimanagement provides scientists, engineers, and other professionals with an understanding of basic principles of human nature as they apply to managing organizations of professionals. It is directed primarily toward those who have been out in the workplace for a few years and are facing their first management challenges. However, the principles apply generally, and specific approaches are given for applying these principles at middle and upper management levels as well.

Technically trained people are usually the ones chosen to manage technically trained people. Since these managers have spent most of their academic and work careers dealing with technical as opposed to people problems, they are ill-equipped to handle the interpersonal relationships of management. Thus it would seem that a compilation of principles with regard to human skills in management would provide the solutions or so I thought.

But as I synthesized the principles of management that are currently bearing fruit in our nation's "quality movement," I recognized that the simple synergism which enables a beehive to produce honey is woefully lacking in most contemporary organizations. Its emergence requires much more than the indoctrination of a few of our organizational "bees." The problem is a holistic one, and it cannot be addressed merely by training (or retraining) a subset of the organization's members. For, once they are absorbed back into the organization they regress to organizational consistency.

Thisled to a major premise that defines the goals of technimanagement. The increased productivity of technical organizations requires a major transition wherein the entire management structure itself undergoes constant and adaptive improvement. This premise has not been accepted by traditional management because it requires protracted meta-control efforts over a long period of time. It cannot be brought about merely by sending everyone off to a three-day training course.

The progress made in our transportation, power, communication, and computer systems has taken decades to evolve. Can we expect the human aspects of our organizations to change overnight? Should we throw up our hands because there is no quick fix?

There is hope! The reason that our physical systems have evolved so effectively is the immediate benefit that was produced as each new component was integrated into the rest of the system. Similarly, there are immediate benefits that will s upport and nurture the transition of our management approaches the immediate productivity increases that come from the empowered organization.

Empowerment can occur only when a manager possesses the courage to act on an accurate perception of reality as it applies to people and their interactions within organizations. This can be attained independently at the lowest levels even within the most traditional of organizations. However, our most progressive managers are recognizing and applying the principles throughout their organizations now!

It is here that the greatest hope lies. For when the productivity of these organizations becomes clear, there will be no turning back to traditional management approaches. This will not be tolerated by managers who are reaping the rewards of increased productivity. (Listen to them!). But, more important, turning back will not be tolerated by the other members of the organization, who are having so much fun while being so productive.

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