Telecommunications for Managers

Telecommunications for Managers

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780136464808
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group
Publication date: 05/28/1998
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 705
Product dimensions: 7.79(w) x 9.44(h) x 1.53(d)

Table of Contents

PART ONE Introduction to the Business Telecommunications Environment 2(94)
CHAPTER 1 Introduction to Telecommunications
3(48)
Introduction
3(1)
Definition of Communication
4(1)
Definition of Telecommunications
5(1)
Definition of Data Communications
6(1)
Data and Information
6(1)
Basic Elements of a Telecommunications System
7(2)
Scope of This Book
9(1)
Importance of Telecommunications to Business
10(4)
Melding of Information Systems and Telecommunications
10(1)
Having Information Available in the Right Place at the Right Time
11(1)
Capturing Basic Data About Business Operations as They Occur
11(1)
Allowing Geographic Dispersion of Facilities and People
12(1)
Online Marketing
13(1)
Reasons for Studying Telecommunications
14(3)
Telecommunications Is Shrinking the World
14(1)
Direct Use on the Job
15(1)
Indirect Use on the Job
15(1)
Wide Use at Home
15(1)
A Possible Career in Telecommunications
16(1)
New Terminology
17(1)
Common Examples of Telecommunications
18(6)
Telephone Call
18(1)
Using the Internet from Home
19(1)
Airline Reservation System
20(2)
Banking with an Automatic Teller Machine (ATM)
22(1)
Automatic Remote Water Meter Reading
23(1)
Requirements for Telecommunications Systems
24(11)
Requirements for Telephone Systems
24(1)
Requirements for Data Communications Systems
25(10)
History of Telecommunications
35(4)
Invention of the Telegraph
36(1)
Invention of the Telephone
36(3)
Telecommunications and the Computer
39(1)
The Challenge of Staying Current
39(1)
Summary
40(1)
Case Study: Telecommunications at Work at Home
41(3)
Case Study: Dow Corning Corporation
44(7)
CHAPTER 2 External Influences on Telecommunications in the Enterprise
51(26)
Introduction
51(1)
The Regulatory Environment
51(16)
Why Regulation?
52(1)
Milestones of Telecommunications Regulation in the United States
53(7)
Deregulation
60(1)
Implications of Deregulation
60(1)
Status of Regulation in other Countries
61(5)
Transnational Data Flow
66(1)
The Telecommunications Industry in the United States
67(6)
BOCs and RBOCs
67(4)
Long Distance Carriers
71(1)
International Carriers
72(1)
Value-Added Carriers
72(1)
Equipment Manufacturers and Providers
72(1)
Summary
73(1)
Case Study: Impact of the Telecommunications Industry and Deregulation on Dow Corning's Telecommunications
74(3)
CHAPTER 3 Telecommunications Architectures and Standards
77(19)
Introduction
77(1)
Definition of Architectures and Standards
77(3)
Standards and Standards-Making Organizations
80(2)
The V. and X. Standards
82(1)
The ITU-T X.400 Standard
82(1)
Advantages and Disadvantages of Standards
83(1)
Communications Architectures
84(1)
The ISO-OSI Model
84(4)
Objective
84(2)
The Seven Layers of the OSI Model
86(2)
The Architecture of the TCP/IP Protocol
88(2)
Manufactures' Architectures
90(1)
A Caveat About Architectures and Standards
90(1)
Advantages of Layered Architectures
91(1)
Disadvantages of Layered Architectures
91(1)
Summary
92(1)
Case Study: Dow Corning's Architecture Decisions
93(3)
PART TWO Telecommunications Applications-How the Enterprise Uses Telecommunications 96(118)
CHAPTER 4 Data Communications Applications
97(50)
Introduction
97(1)
Categories of Applications
97(3)
Human-Machine Interaction
97(2)
Type of Information
99(1)
Timeliness
99(1)
Data Application Evolution
100(13)
Administrative Message Switching
101(6)
The Evolution to Computers
107(1)
Inquiry-Response
108(1)
File Updating
108(1)
Timesharing
109(1)
Transaction Processing Systems
109(1)
Client-Server Computing and Distributed Processing
110(3)
Typical Applications of Data Communications
113(22)
Structured Data Applications
113(10)
Unstructured Data Applications
123(4)
Image Applications
127(5)
The Internet
132(3)
Special Considerations of Data Communications Applications
135(4)
Response Time
135(1)
Security
135(1)
Planning for Failures
135(2)
Disaster Recovery Planning
137(2)
Summary
139(1)
Case Study: Telecommunications at Work in a Small Business
140(2)
Case Study: Dow Corning's Applications That Use Telecommunications
142(5)
CHAPTER 5 Voice Communications
147(67)
Introduction
147(1)
The Telephone Set
148(5)
Primary Functions
148(1)
Telephone Transmitter
149(1)
Telephone Receiver
150(1)
Telephone Switchhook
151(2)
Making a Telephone Call
153(4)
"Dialing" a Number
153(1)
Making the Connection
154(2)
Ringing
156(1)
Central Office Equipment
157(4)
Manual Switching
157(2)
Automatic Switching
159(1)
Electronic Switching
159(1)
Design Considerations
159(2)
Central Office Organization
161(2)
The Public Telephone Network
163(1)
Analog Signals
164(7)
Signal Frequency
165(3)
Bandwidth
168(1)
Signal Amplitude
168(2)
Signal Phase
170(1)
Attributes of a Voice Signal
171(1)
Frequency Division Multiplexing (FDM)
171(1)
Modulation
172(2)
TASI Voice Transmission
174(1)
Interoffice Signaling
175(1)
Direct Current (DC) Signaling
175(1)
Tone Signaling
175(1)
Common Channel Signaling
176(1)
Telephone Numbering
176(2)
Local Calling
178(1)
Long Distance Calling
178(2)
Special Types of Telephone Services
180(5)
Discounted Calling
180(1)
800 Service
181(1)
900 Service
182(1)
Software Defined Network
183(1)
Foreign Exchange (FX) Lines
183(1)
Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN)
184(1)
Telephone Calls on the Internet
184(1)
Private Telephone Systems
185(7)
Key Systems
185(1)
Private Branch Exchange/Private Automatic Branch Exchange/Computer Branch Exchange
186(2)
System Features
188(2)
Station Features
190(2)
PBX Security
192(1)
Centrex Service
192(1)
Private Voice Networks
193(1)
Tie Lines
193(1)
Private Networks for Large Organizations
194(1)
Audio Teleconferencing
194(2)
Voice Mail
196(2)
Automated Voice Response
197(1)
Automated Attendant
197(1)
Audiotex
197(1)
Interactive Voice Response
197(1)
Wireless Communications
198(6)
Cordless Telephones
198(1)
Cellular Telephone Service
199(3)
Personal Communication Service
202(1)
Marine and Aeronautical Telephone Services
203(1)
The Voice Network Used for Data Transmission
204(1)
Summary
204(2)
Case Study: Telecommunications at Work in a Brokerage Office
206(2)
Case Study: Dow Corning's Telephone System
208(6)
PART THREE The User Interface to the Network 214(34)
CHAPTER 6 Data Terminals and Personal Computers
215(33)
Introduction
215(1)
Definitions
216(1)
Terminal Classification
216(17)
Teletypewriter Terminal
217(1)
Video Display Terminal (VDT)
218(5)
Personal Computers Used As Terminals
223(3)
Engineering Workstations
226(1)
Industry-Oriented Transaction Terminals
227(1)
Remote Job Entry (RJE) Terminals
228(1)
Facsimile Machines
229(2)
Specialized Terminals
231(2)
Cluster Control Units
233(2)
Terminal Intelligence Levels
235(2)
Intelligent Terminals
236(1)
Smart Terminals
236(1)
Dumb Terminals
237(1)
Workstation Ergonomics
237(1)
The VDT and Health Concerns
238(1)
Terminal Selection
239(1)
Typical Terminal Scenario
240(1)
Summary
240(2)
Case Study: Evolution of Data Terminal Purchases at Dow Corning
242(6)
PART FOUR How Data Is Communicated-The Technical Details 248(148)
CHAPTER 7 Data Coding
249(20)
Introduction
249(1)
Two-State Phenomena
249(1)
Coding
250(1)
Machine Codes
251(1)
Parity Checking
252(1)
Escape Mechanisms
253(1)
Specific Codes
254(5)
Baudot Code
254(1)
American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII)
254(3)
Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code (EBCDIC)
257(1)
Unicode
258(1)
Other Coding Systems
258(1)
Control Characters
259(1)
Transmission Control Characters
259(1)
Device Control Characters
260(1)
Format Effector Control Characters
260(1)
Code Efficiency
260(1)
Code Conversion
261(1)
Data Compression/Compaction
261(3)
Character Compression/Huffman Coding
263(1)
Run Length Encoding
263(1)
Character Stripping
263(1)
Data Encryption
264(2)
Summary
266(3)
CHAPTER 8 Data Transmission and Modems
269(44)
Introduction
269(1)
Circuit Signaling Rate
270(1)
Circuit Speed
270(1)
Modes of Transmission
271(5)
Data Flow
271(2)
Type of Physical Connection
273(1)
Timing
273(3)
Analog Signals and Transmission
276(2)
Digital Signals
278(1)
Digital Transmission
279(1)
Digital Transmission of Analog Signals
280(3)
Digital Transmission of Digital Signals
283(1)
Digital Transmitter/Receivers
283(1)
Analog Transmission of Digital Signals
284(1)
Modems
284(12)
How Modems Work
286(1)
Modem Classification
296(4)
Modems for Asynchronous Transmission
296(1)
Modems for Synchronous Transmission
297(1)
Acoustically Coupled Modems
297(1)
Limited Distance Modems/Short Haul Modems
298(1)
Modem Eliminators/Null Modems
298(1)
Facsimile Modems
298(1)
Modems for Fiber-Optic Circuits
299(1)
Cable Modems
299(1)
Modem Interfaces
300(4)
Interface Between the Modem and the Communications Line
300(1)
Interface Between the Modem and the Data Terminal Equipment (DTE)
300(4)
Other Modem Functions and Capabilities
304(3)
Reverse Channel
304(1)
Auto Dial/Auto Answer
305(1)
Internal Modems
305(1)
Modem Diagnostics
306(1)
Modem Selection Criteria
307(1)
Summary
307(1)
Case Study: Dow Corning's Use of Modems
308(5)
CHAPTER 9 Communications Circuits
313(54)
Introduction
313(1)
Definitions
313(1)
Types of Circuits
314(9)
Point-to-Point Circuits
314(1)
Multipoint Circuits
315(1)
Two-Wire and Four-Wire Circuits
315(1)
Analog Circuits
316(1)
Digital Circuits
316(2)
Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN)
318(2)
T-Carrier Systems
320(2)
Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS)
322(1)
Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL)
322(1)
Circuit Media
323(16)
Wire
323(2)
Shielded Twisted Pair
325(1)
Coaxial Cable
326(1)
Optical Fiber
327(7)
Microwave Radio
334(2)
Satellite
336(3)
Infrared
339(1)
Summary of Media Characteristics
339(1)
Circuit Acquisition and Ownership
339(5)
Private Circuits
340(2)
Leased Circuits
342(1)
Switched (Dial-Up) Circuits
343(1)
Circuit Identification
344(1)
Multiplexing and Concentrating
345(4)
Time Division Multiplexing (TDM)
345(1)
Statistical Time Division Multiplexing (STDM)
346(2)
Concentration
348(1)
Inverse Concentration
349(1)
Circuit Error Conditions
349(2)
Background Noise
349(1)
Impulse Noise
350(1)
Attenuation
350(1)
Attenuation Distortion
350(1)
Envelope Delay Distortion
350(1)
Phase Jitter
350(1)
Echo
351(1)
Crosstalk
351(1)
Dropouts
351(1)
Impact of Errors
351(1)
Error Prevention
352(1)
Line Conditioning
352(1)
Shielding
353(1)
Improving Connections
353(1)
Electronic versus Mechanical Equipment
353(1)
Error Detection
353(3)
Echo Checking
354(1)
Vertical Redundancy Checking (VRC) or Parity Checking
354(1)
Longitudinal Redundancy Checking (LRC)
354(1)
Cyclic Redundancy Checking (CRC)
355(1)
Error Correction
356(1)
Retransmission
356(1)
Forward Error Correction (FEC)
357(1)
Wiring and Cabling
357(2)
The Growing Demand for Bandwidth
359(1)
Summary
360(1)
Case Study: Dow Corning's Data Communications Circuits
361(6)
CHAPTER 10 Data Link Control Protocols
367(29)
Introduction
367(1)
Definition and the Need for Protocols
367(1)
Data Link Protocol Functions
368(1)
Desirable Attributes of Data Link Protocols
369(1)
Protocol Implementation
369(1)
Predetermined Communications Parameters
370(1)
Protocol Concepts-A General Model
370(3)
Line Access
370(2)
Message Format
372(1)
Asynchronous Data Link Protocols
373(3)
The Xmodem Protocol
374(1)
Other Asynchronous Protocols
375(1)
Synchronous Data Link Protocols
376(9)
Classification
376(1)
Binary Synchronous Communications (BSC, BISYNC)
377(3)
Digital Data Communications Message Protocol (DDCMP)
380(3)
Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC)
383(2)
Local Area Network (LAN) Protocols
385(3)
Logical Link Control
386(1)
Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD)
386(1)
Token Passing Protocol
387(1)
Protocol Conversion
388(3)
Dedicated Hardware Protocol Converters
389(1)
Add-In Circuit Board Protocol Converters
389(1)
Software Protocol Converters
389(2)
Gateways as Protocol Converters
391(1)
Summary
391(1)
Case Study: Protocols Used in Dow Corning's Data Network
392(4)
PART FIVE Communications Networks 396(188)
CHAPTER 11 Network Fundamentals
397(54)
Introduction
397(1)
Network Definition and Classification
397(2)
Networks Classified by Topology
399(6)
Star Network
399(1)
Hierarchical Network
400(1)
Mesh Network
401(1)
Bus Network
402(1)
Ring Network
403(1)
Hybrid Networks
404(1)
Networks Classified by Ownership
405(2)
Private Networks
405(1)
Public Networks
406(1)
Value Added Networks (VANs)
406(1)
Networks Classified by Geography
407(2)
Wide Area Networks (WANs)
407(1)
Metropolitan Area Networks (MANs)
407(2)
Local Area Networks (LANs)
409(1)
Networks Classified by Transmission Technology
409(8)
Circuit Switching
409(2)
Packet Switching
411(4)
Frame Relay
415(1)
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)
416(1)
Routing Messages in the Network
417(2)
Connection-Oriented and Connectionless Routing
417(1)
Broadcast Routing
418(1)
Centralized Routing
418(1)
Distributed Routing
419(1)
Static and Dynamic Routing
419(1)
Interconnecting Networks
419(7)
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
420(3)
The Internet
423(2)
Intranets
425(1)
Connecting the Network to the Computer
426(1)
Circuit Termination Alternatives
426(1)
Front-End Processors (FEPs)
427(5)
Front-End Processor Functions
429(3)
The Role of the Host Computer
432(7)
Types of Host Software
432(7)
Manufacturers' Architectures
439(4)
IBM Corporation's System Network Architecture (SNA)
439(3)
Digital Equipment Corporation's Digital Network Architecture (DNA)
442(1)
Summary
443(2)
Case Study: Dow Corning's Wide Area Data Communications Network
445(6)
CHAPTER 12 Local Area Networks
451(50)
Introduction
451(1)
Definition and Characteristics of LANs
452(1)
Reasons Why LANs Are Popular
452(2)
Hardware Sharing
452(1)
Software Sharing
453(1)
Service
453(1)
Local Control
453(1)
Information Sharing
454(1)
LAN Applications
454(1)
Relating LANs to the OSI Model
455(1)
LAN Topologies
456(1)
LAN Media and Cabling
457(1)
Hubs
457(1)
Wiring Cost
458(1)
Wiring Documentation
458(1)
Wireless LANs
458(1)
LAN Transmission Techniques
459(1)
LAN Standards
460(1)
Widely Used LANs
461(8)
Ethernet
461(4)
Token Ring
465(1)
100VG-AnyLAN
465(2)
The Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) Standard
467(1)
MAP
468(1)
AppleTalk
468(1)
Arcnet
469(1)
Expanding the LAN
469(9)
Bridges
471(1)
Switches
471(1)
Routers
472(2)
Brouters
474(1)
Gateways
474(4)
Workstations and Servers
478(3)
Client-Server Computing
478(1)
File Servers
479(1)
Print Servers
480(1)
Communications Servers
480(1)
Network Attachment
480(1)
LAN Software
481(4)
Software for the Workstation
482(1)
Software for the Server
483(2)
LAN Performance
485(1)
Protocol
485(1)
Speed of the Transmission
485(1)
Amount of Traffic
486(1)
Error Rates
486(1)
Efficiency of the LAN Software
486(1)
Speed of the Server Computers and Disks
486(1)
LAN Selection Criteria
486(4)
Installing a LAN
490(2)
Managing the LAN
492(1)
LAN Management Software
493(1)
LAN Security
493(1)
Summary
494(1)
Case Study: LAN Selection at Nippon Chemics
495(2)
Case Study: Dow Corning's Use of Local Area Networks
497(4)
CHAPTER 13 Network Management and Operations
501(42)
Introduction
501(1)
Definition of Network Management
501(2)
Why It Is Important to Manage the Network
503(1)
Network Management in Small Organizations
504(1)
The Functions of Network Management
504(21)
Network Operations Group
505(1)
Problem Management
506(7)
Performance Management
513(5)
Configuration Control
518(4)
Change Management
522(2)
Management Reporting
524(1)
Network Management for Local Area Networks (LANs)
525(1)
Network Management Software
526(1)
The Physical Facility
527(3)
Staffing the Network Operations Group
530(1)
Network Management Outsourcing
531(1)
Communications Technical Support
532(1)
The Functions of Communications Technical Support
532(3)
Supporting Communications Software
532(1)
Providing Third-Level Problem Solving
533(1)
Assisting in Network Analysis and Design
534(1)
Network Performance Analysis and Tuning
534(1)
Hardware Evaluation
534(1)
Programming
535(1)
Consulting and General Problem Solving
535(1)
Staffing the Communications Technical Support Group
535(1)
Summary
536(1)
Case Study: Dow Corning's Network Management and Operations
537(6)
CHAPTER 14 Network Design and Implementation
543(41)
Introduction
543(1)
The Network Design and Implementation Process
543(3)
Project Phases
545(1)
Network Analysis and Design
546(22)
The Request Phase
546(1)
Preliminary Investigation and Feasibility Study
547(3)
Detailed Understanding and Definition of the Requirements
550(7)
Investigation of Alternatives
557(1)
Network Design
558(4)
Selection of Vendors and Equipment
562(3)
Calculation of Costs
565(2)
Documentation of the Network Design and Implementation Plan
567(1)
Management Understanding of the Design and Approval of Implementation
567(1)
Network Implementation
568(5)
Equipment Order
568(1)
Preparation for Network Implementation
569(1)
Installation of Equipment
569(1)
Training
569(1)
System Testing
570(1)
Cutover
571(1)
Implementation Cleanup and Audit
572(1)
LAN Design
573(1)
Traffic Analysis
573(1)
Internetworking
573(1)
LAN Administration
574(1)
Voice Network Design
574(3)
Project Management
577(1)
Summary
578(1)
Case Study: Dow Corning's Communications Network Design
579(5)
PART SIX Managing the Telecommunications Department 584(67)
CHAPTER 15 Telecommunications Department Management
585(44)
Introduction
585(1)
The Need for Proactive Telecommunications Management
585(3)
Where the Telecommunications Organization Fits Within the Company
588(6)
The Functions of the Telecommunications Department
594(5)
Design and Implementation of New Facilities and Services
595(1)
Network Operations and Technical Support
595(1)
Administrative Support
595(4)
Backup of Operational Personnel
599(1)
Telecommunications Management Responsibilities
599(15)
Staffing
600(3)
Organizing
603(1)
Planning
604(3)
Directing
607(1)
Controlling
608(6)
Cost Effectiveness
614(2)
Security
616(3)
Physical Security
617(1)
Network Access Control
617(1)
Personnel Security
618(1)
Disaster Recovery Planning
619(1)
Other Management Issues
619(2)
Selling the Capabilities of the Telecommunications Department
619(1)
Project Justification Criteria
620(1)
Transnational Data Flow
621(1)
Survey of Telecommunications Management Trends
621(1)
Summary
621(2)
Case Study: Dow Corning's Telecommunications Management
623(6)
CHAPTER 16 Future Directions in Telecommunications
629(22)
Introduction
629(1)
Trends in Electronics
630(2)
Trends in Communications Circuits
632(2)
Trends in Terminals and Workstations
634(2)
Trends in Standardization
636(1)
Trends in Regulation
637(1)
Trends in the Application of Communications Technology
637(8)
Telecommuting
638(1)
Electronic Document Interchange (EDI)
639(1)
Telediagnosis
640(1)
Medical Telediagnosis
640(1)
Automobile Navigation by Satellite
641(1)
Tracking Cargo Containers
642(1)
Electronic Journalism
643(1)
High-Speed Communications to the Home
643(1)
Smart Homes
644(1)
Sociological Impact of Telecommunications Capabilities
645(1)
Summary
646(2)
Case Study: Dow Corning's Communications Network Vision
648(3)
Appendix A The ISO-OSI Model 651(3)
Appendix B Telecommunications Trade-Offs 654(2)
Appendix C Telecommunications Periodicals and Newsletters 656(1)
Appendix D Telecommunications Professional and User Associations 657(2)
Appendix E Organizations That Conduct Telecommunications Seminars 659(1)
Appendix F Acronyms in the Text 660(3)
Glossary 663(29)
Index 692

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