Free Shipping on Orders of $40 or More
Telling Histories: Black Women Historians in the Ivory Tower

Telling Histories: Black Women Historians in the Ivory Tower

by Deborah Gray White
Telling Histories: Black Women Historians in the Ivory Tower

Telling Histories: Black Women Historians in the Ivory Tower

by Deborah Gray White

NOOK Book(eBook)

$22.99 $25.99 Save 12% Current price is $22.99, Original price is $25.99. You Save 12%.

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now

Overview

The field of black women's history gained recognition as a legitimate field of study only late in the twentieth century. Collecting stories that are both deeply personal and powerfully political, Telling Histories compiles seventeen personal narratives by leading black women historians at various stages in their careers. Their essays illuminate how—first as graduate students and then as professional historians—they entered and navigated the realm of higher education, a world concerned with and dominated by whites and men. In distinct voices and from different vantage points, the personal histories revealed here also tell the story of the struggle to establish a new scholarly field. Black women, alleged by affirmative-action supporters and opponents to be "twofers," recount how they have confronted racism, sexism, and homophobia on college campuses. They explore how the personal and the political intersect in historical research and writing and in the academy. Organized by the years the contributors earned their Ph.D.'s, these essays follow the black women who entered the field of history during and after the civil rights and black power movements, endured the turbulent 1970s, and opened up the field of black women's history in the 1980s. By comparing the experiences of older and younger generations, this collection makes visible the benefits and drawbacks of the institutionalization of African American and African American women's history. Telling Histories captures the voices of these pioneers, intimately and publicly. Contributors:Elsa Barkley Brown, University of MarylandMia Bay, Rutgers UniversityLeslie Brown, Washington University in St. LouisCrystal N. Feimster, University of North Carolina at Chapel HillSharon Harley, University of MarylandWanda A. Hendricks, University of South CarolinaDarlene Clark Hine, Northwestern UniversityChana Kai Lee, University of GeorgiaJennifer L. Morgan, New York UniversityNell Irvin Painter, Newark, New JerseyMerline Pitre, Texas Southern UniversityBarbara Ransby, University of Illinois at ChicagoJulie Saville, University of ChicagoBrenda Elaine Stevenson, University of California, Los AngelesUla Taylor, University of California, BerkeleyRosalyn Terborg-Penn, Morgan State UniversityDeborah Gray White, Rutgers UniversityThe field of black women's history gained recognition as a legitimate field of study only late in the twentieth century. Collecting stories that are both deeply personal and powerfully political, Telling Histories compiles seventeen personal narratives by leading black women historians at various stages in their careers, illuminating how they entered and navigated higher education, a world concerned with—and dominated by—whites and men. In distinct voices and from different vantage points, the personal histories revealed here also tell the story of the struggle to establish the fields of African American and African American women's history. The contributors are Elsa Barkley Brown, Mia Bay, Leslie Brown, Crystal N. Feimster, Sharon Harley, Wanda A. Hendricks, Darlene Clark Hine, Chana Kai Lee, Jennifer L. Morgan, Nell Irvin Painter, Merline Pitre, Barbara Ransby, Julie Saville, Brenda Elaine Stevenson, Ula Taylor, Rosalyn Terborg-Penn, and Deborah Gray White. The editor is Deborah Gray White.—>



Related collections and offers

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780807889121
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date: 11/30/2009
Series: Gender and American Culture
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 304
File size: 3 MB

About the Author

Deborah Gray White is Board of Governors Professor of History at Rutgers University. Her previous books include Too Heavy a Load: Black Women in Defense of Themselves, 1894-1994 and Ar'n't I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

The silence is shattered. Telling Histories reveals the story of the birth, institutionalization, and professionalization of the field of African American women's history. In retrospect, who could have been against it? But the history told here makes clear that far too many were. African American women historians, bearing 'unpleasant and unpopular news' and doing 'unmentionable history,' found 'begrudging tolerance,' 'benevolent disinterest,' and indeed, outright racism and sexism. Allowed to enter the history profession but asked to do so in silence and awe, they said no. And we are all the richer for it. Telling Histories should be required reading for all historians and administrators and for all graduate students—who will one day become chairs, deans, referees, professional organization officers, grant officers, and colleagues.—Thavolia Glymph, Duke University



The arresting individual voices of these women blend together into a choir of unusual diversity, range, and depth. Individually and collectively, these autobiographical essays offer penetrating insight into the personal, social, and cultural worlds that have shaped black women's experiences in the historical profession. What these stories tell us about the intransigence of racism, sexism, and classism in society generally—and the academy and history departments more specifically—is both disturbing and sobering, ultimately reminding us that a concerted struggle against these inequities must be redoubled.—Waldo E. Martin Jr., University of California, Berkeley



This is a compelling collection of essays by a distinguished group of women who have made history in a double sense—through both their lives and their writings. More than merely autobiography, this volume illuminates the manifold ways that legacies of slavery and Jim Crow have shaped knowledge production as well as the producers of knowledge. Together, these essays document the emergence of black women's voices in powerful ways that inform, instruct, and inspire. This book will change lives—and even the writing of history.—Eileen Boris, University of California, Santa Barbara



I couldn't put Telling Histories down, although I did sometimes have to put it aside, so powerful are the emotions it evokes. Deborah Gray White has done something quite wonderful here, first by analyzing so brilliantly the forces that kept black women from practicing history for so long, then by telling her own eloquent story, and finally by creating this priceless collection of first-person testimonies. These 'telling histories' will indeed serve as valuable primary sources and teaching tools. They will also stand as a significant contribution to a most necessary project: the toppling of the barriers, both internal and external, that constrict the professoriate, silence voices, and prevent diverse scholars from writing and teaching freely and well.—Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Customer Reviews