The Temple and the Lodge

The Temple and the Lodge

by Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh
2.5 4

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Temple and the Lodge 2.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book. There is much historical fact in it. Many writers have cribbed from it on this subject. The authors also speculate. But it can hardly be denied that fraternities influence the affairs of men. It even has some photos.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
It is important to rember that this is not a work of researched history. It is a novel: utter fiction throughout, so there is no point in reading it if you are going to be irritated by rather facile and obvious confabulations. If, however, you fancy a conspiracy novel with a bit of wishful thinking thrown in - this is the book for you.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book is basically 2 parts: attempting to link the Templar Knights with the 1st Freemasons and the American revolution. The author does well linking the Knights to the Freemasons with the limited knowledge available but the problem is their is lots of missing links in the process the author doesnt get to. The 2nd half is pretty good. Good historical information most of it is even believable.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book very much, even though it was slow-going at times. The amount of information given is impressive and it flows nicely. If you are truly interested in the history of Freemasonry (written by non-masons), I suggest you try this. Also touches on the differences with MM degrees vs. 'extra' degrees (Scottish, York) and their origins. Dry at the beginning but worth it by the middle.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book can almost be neatly divided into two parts - the first half, which is full of Scottish names and Scottish places that I've never heard of and had absolutely no hope of keeping straight. Then there's the second half, which I found extremely interesting because it was about the American Revolution (something I'm pretty familiar with). Ultimately, though, the fault I have with this book is that it doesn't really do an effective job of linking the Knights Templar with Freemasonry. With the limited historical reference, it is impossible to do so, so why do they try? It was a valiant attempt, but just fell short in my mind.
Ken Miller More than 1 year ago
Not very well writen. Does not concern the subject. Too many negative works about the Templers. One loses interest when all it rells you is what is not there. Boring.