Terrible Things: An Allegory of the Holocaust

Terrible Things: An Allegory of the Holocaust

by Eve Bunting

Paperback(Revised)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780827605077
Publisher: The Jewish Publication Society
Publication date: 09/01/1989
Edition description: Revised
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 143,453
Product dimensions: 7.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range: 6 - 9 Years

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Terrible Things 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
whitneyharrison on LibraryThing 22 days ago
This book doesn't really make sense unless you read what the author says at the beginning. It really makes people think about how good standing up for people can be and what it could have changed in the past. Instead of just turning our eyes in the other direction. In school many students see a lot of injustices done to their friends and even them. This is a great book to show what could happen if we all turned away from those things, and how negative things have happened in the past because of it.
irkthepurist on LibraryThing 22 days ago
so... on the one hand it's one of the most peculiarly leaden bits of obvious analogy ever written, but on the other hand... the artwork is extraordinary. terrifying but... extraordinary. about the definition of mixed bag really...
rampaginglibrarian on LibraryThing 22 days ago
I think that part of the problems involved in trying to evaluate whether or not this is an appropriate book for children is that, as adults, we are coming at the material understanding what it is an allegory for. It makes us shudder to think of it because it is so well-written and concieved. We cannot see it without the connections it makes.Looking at it with this admitted lack of perspective i think that it could be appropriate for children because the animals are "taken away", there is no mention as to what happens to them (and, historically, many people were unaware/in denial of what was happening while the Holocaust was happening.) Discussion with the children doesn't have to include what happened to the animals (and i realize that the unknown is almost more frightening, but it is hard to know how children will actually react as they don't have our pre-conceptions.) It is definitely appropriate for older students as a discussion point about the Holocaust.The ideas presented (not the literal, historical record, but their allegory) are important to talk about from an early age and i believe the author put much thought into how to do so and was successful. Parents and teachers should put as much thought about how (or if) to share it with their children.
ssajj on LibraryThing 22 days ago
Terrible Thing is an allegory of the Holocaust. The forest animals live happily until the Terrible Things come. They come first for ¿every creature with feathers...¿ The animals without feathers are relieved that the Terrible Things have not come for them; they allow the birds to be captured by nets, then make excuses for why the Terrible Things might want to remove the birds and agree that life is better without them. Little Rabbit questions the Terrible Things¿ actions and is quickly told to "Just mind your own business... We don't want them to get mad at us." The Terrible Things continue coming for various animals until the only creatures left are white rabbits. At the end there is one small rabbit who manages to hide left behind. Little Rabbit begins his journey to speak out for what is right and hopes someone is willing to listen. This is a good book to start discussing prejudice and racism with students. I think the book would be appropriate for upper elementary students and beyond. (I¿ve included the quote that inspired this story below.)First They Came for the Jews First they came for the Jews and I did not speak out because I was not a Jew. Then they came for the Communists and I did not speak out because I was not a Communist. Then they came for the trade unionists and I did not speak out because I was not a trade unionist. Then they came for me and there was no one left to speak out for me.- Rev. Niemoller
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is good for young students to undertand about bad things like the evil shadows in this book, but even for kids the Holocaust is an event in history that shouldnt be lightened by the use of animals and forests. This fairy-tale like story doesnt to do the Holocaust justice, even if it is for a younger age group.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book for using with a Holocaust unit. Suggestion--after reading the book, have students draw what they think the "terrible things" look like (no illustrations are provided for "the terrible things"). This book will make you think about standing by and doing nothing!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This book makes you understand that in some cases like these you might have to listen to your self not others because that they might not care about it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a future educator, the task of teaching the holocaust to small children is daunting. This book is a wonderful way to introduce a difficult topic to children in elementary school.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book to teach children the meaning of bystanders and what can happen if bystanders don't speak up for victims. An easy to read book that is good for all grade levels- even middle school.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In school we are doing a section on the holocaust. My teacher read us the story Terrible Things. I thought it gave an excellent example of what really happened. It gives children and adults a quick and easy reading about the War, and what happend to the Jewish,in an different way.