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Thank You, Dr. Martin Luther King, JR.!
     

Thank You, Dr. Martin Luther King, JR.!

by Eleanora E. Tate
 

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Mary Elouise is dying to be in the school play, but the part she gets is the last one she wants — narrator of the Black History skit. Even though her grandmother, Big Momma, says it's important to remember her heritage, Mary Elouise hates being reminded about slavery and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. She'd rather be in the skit about presidents with Brandy, the

Overview

Mary Elouise is dying to be in the school play, but the part she gets is the last one she wants — narrator of the Black History skit. Even though her grandmother, Big Momma, says it's important to remember her heritage, Mary Elouise hates being reminded about slavery and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. She'd rather be in the skit about presidents with Brandy, the girl in her class with beautiful blond hair. Then one day, two storytellers come to school with glorious tales of Africa... and a new way for Mary Elouise to see herself and her heritage.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-- Fourth grader Mary Elouise Avery struggles with a low self-image in this consciousness-raising story of black pride. When Gumbo Grove Elementary School prepares for its annual Presidents' Month play, Mary Elouise is selected as narrator for the new black history segment. She dislikes the role, as she feels that it emphasizes the difference between her and her Barbiesque classroom idol, Brandy. Her mother scolds her for disposing of black dolls in favor of white dolls, and her perceptive grandmother advises her to ``love yourself for who you are.'' By story's end, her part in the play has given Mary Elouise a better understanding of her heritage. She also has a new idol, a black storyteller who perceives her angst and challenges her to seek any goal with determination. The message is clear, and the plot is predictable. Except for the condescending naivete of a white teacher, characters offer a positive perspective on black culture. This purposeful novel conveys the challenge of maintaining ethnic pride in a society dominated by whites. Mary Elouise learns about her heritage, herself, and friendship in this first-person narrative. Realistic dialogue and peer conflicts, plus Mary Elouise's insights make this an appropriate choice for young readers. --Gerry Larson, Chewning Junior High School, Durham, NC

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531151518
Publisher:
Scholastic Library Publishing
Publication date:
01/01/1990
Pages:
237

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