That Day in September

That Day in September

by Artie Van Why

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$9.95
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Overview

We all have our stories to tell of where we were the morning of September 11, 2001. This is one of them. In "That Day In September" Artie Van Why gives an eyewitness account of that fateful morning. From the moment he heard "a loud boom" in his office across from the World Trade Center, to stepping out onto the street, Artie vividly transports the reader back to the day that changed our lives and our country forever. "That Day In September" takes you beyond the events of that morning. By sharing his thoughts, fears and hopes, Artie expresses what it was like to be in New York City in the weeks and months following. The reader comes away from "That Day In September" with not only a more intimate understanding of the events of that day but also with a personal glimpse of how one person's life was dramatically changed forever.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781411683150
Publisher: Lulu.com
Publication date: 10/06/2006
Pages: 108
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.26(d)

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That Day in September 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
LetsBookIt More than 1 year ago
We see the pictures on TV or in the newspaper but our minds censor the feelings, smells, thoughts, sounds so that we can absorb without joining the ranks of the damaged. Artie Van Why didn't have that option because he didn't see the pictures on TV or read the newspaper accounts. Instead, he stepped out of his office building across the street from the twin towers and walked into Hell. 'That Day in September (a personal remembrance of 9/11)" is a journal of sorts; an attempt to sort through the images, feelings and disarray of a life, a world, forever changed. Mr. Van Why's book is powerful in its simplicity. He doesn't try to sensationalise the events he witnessed. He tells it like it was. He doesn't ask for pity. He simply explains how he was affected and what the world around him was like on September 11, 2001 and the days, weeks and months following. I appreciate that Artie Van Why stays focused. He doesn't try to tug at our heartstrings by adding lots of sappy observations. That is not to say that I didn't cry my way through a lot of this little book. I did. The starkness of the narration allows the reader to feel the starkness of the day. The comparisons of before, during and after are surreal. Exactly as I remember thinking the event was as I watched the footage. I was also impressed with the honesty of Artie`s remembrance. He didn`t try to enhance his actions that day or exaggerate the connections he had, or didn`t have, with the victims and survivors. He simply told it like it was. I can`t even imagine how hard that might be to do. The only issue I have with the hype around 9/11 is that it tends to overshadow the fact that terrorist acts are taking place every day all over the world. Innocent people are dying while going about their daily activities. I'm not saying we shouldn't remember, or that we shouldn't build memorials, but in the few other books I have read about the events of that day in September, I have been left with the feeling the authors didn't recognise that it was one, albeit the biggest one, of a plethora of terrorist actions that occurred before and after that day. I hope people remember that each life counts. And I want to thank this author for not going there. This book is his personal remembrance of finding himself in the middle of a terrorist attack. I didn't once feel like he was negating other attacks or deaths. He was just telling his story. My conclusion: highly recommended reading.
skstiles612 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Artie Van Why¿s novel ¿That Day In September¿ is one of those books that will stay with you for a long time after you read it. I know there will be many who won¿t read a book like this because they just want to forget the events of that day. I don¿t and I can¿t. To me forgetting the events is like forgetting all of those who perished that day. Artie gives us a first hand, eyewitness look at that day. In many ways his story is the same as others we may have heard or read about. In many ways it is different. Everyone was affected differently that day. For many who lived in New York and witnessed first hand the terror, the events are permanently etched in their minds. Some of them may have been able to move on with their lives, and many of them have been so affected by that day that it was necessary to move away. Artie gives us a look into his life before and after 9/11. I cried throughout this book. I brought back so many emotions and thoughts. We carried our emotions on our sleeves for months. On pages 53- 54 of his book he is talking about finding out that two young men in his apartment building had been victims of this day and how doing simple things such as buy flowers to be placed on the table at the memorial set up in the lobby of their building was a way to grieve those he did not personally know yet felt a connection to. Many of us grieved for those we did not know that lost their life that day. It was and is a part of the healing process. This book brought back all of those raw feelings and emotions in me. That is not a bad thing. The healing process takes years. It doesn¿t mean we are stuck in a situation it means we still care deeply about those things. Reading books like Artie¿s makes us realize that we were all there that day even if we were not standing on a corner across from the Towers or Pentagon. Emotionally we were all there and it changed all of us. Artie gives us a look into his own life and how it changed him. I challenge you to read this book and see the connections with your own life. I will tell you right now. If you are like me you need to make sure you have a box of tissues handy. I will recommend this book to all of my friends. It is one of the better stories of 9/11 I have read. It gives us a glimpse into the effect emotionally, socially, and professionally that these events had on people like you and I. If I awarded stars on my blog this would definitely be a 5 star book.
l_manning on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I think almost everyone can remember where they were on September 11, 2001. I can remember exactly what I was doing when I heard about the first plane and the confusion about what was going on. I can remember how my heart sank as the reality of the situation hit me. I can remember the horror of watching it all unfold on television. New York City is a city I love, and I could never imagine having been there on that day. Artie Van Why doesn't have to wonder because he knows. He was there. This book is his story.There is some back story about the author that explains how and why he was so close to what happened that day. However, the real story is his retelling of what happened that day. There are so many details that were things that had also stuck out to me as I remember that day. However, reading it by someone who was there, who felt everything as it happened, is not easy. The author does a wonderful job of being descriptive without being graphic.The further we get away from the actual day, the more it feels like people seem to forget what it was like that day. Artie Van Why never will. His life was forever changed by what happened then. So many people's lives were changed, and we should never forget that. I almost feel like this book should be required reading to try to understand what it felt like to be there. I hope that everyone will take a chance to read this book and truly remember. It's not long, but it tells a lot of story in a those pages. I highly recommend this book and hope everyone will take a chance to read it.Book provided by author for review.
DanaBurgess on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
We see the pictures on TV or in the newspaper but our minds censor the feelings, smells, thoughts, sounds so that we can absorb without joining the ranks of the damaged. Artie Van Why didn't have that option because he didn't see the pictures on TV or read the newspaper accounts. Instead, he stepped out of his office building across the street from the twin towers and walked into Hell.'That Day in September (a personal remembrance of 9/11)" is a journal of sorts; an attempt to sort through the images, feelings and disarray of a life, a world, forever changed. Mr. Van Why's book is powerful in its simplicity. He doesn't try to sensationalise the events he witnessed. He tells it like it was. He doesn't ask for pity. He simply explains how he was affected and what the world around him was like on September 11, 2001 and the days, weeks and months following.I appreciate that Artie Van Why stays focused. He doesn't try to tug at our heartstrings by adding lots of sappy observations. That is not to say that I didn't cry my way through a lot of this little book. I did. The starkness of the narration allows the reader to feel the starkness of the day. The comparisons of before, during and after are surreal. Exactly as I remember thinking the event was as I watched the footage.I was also impressed with the honesty of Artie`s remembrance. He didn`t try to enhance his actions that day or exaggerate the connections he had, or didn`t have, with the victims and survivors. He simply told it like it was. I can`t even imagine how hard that might be to do.The only issue I have with the hype around 9/11 is that it tends to overshadow the fact that terrorist acts are taking place every day all over the world. Innocent people are dying while going about their daily activities. I'm not saying we shouldn't remember, or that we shouldn't build memorials, but in the few other books I have read about the events of that day in September, I have been left with the feeling the authors didn't recognise that it was one, albeit the biggest one, of a plethora of terrorist actions that occurred before and after that day. I hope people remember that each life counts. And I want to thank this author for not going there. This book is his personal remembrance of finding himself in the middle of a terrorist attack. I didn't once feel like he was negating other attacks or deaths. He was just telling his story. My conclusion: highly recommended reading.
crazy4reading on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I want to thank Mr. Artie Van Why for giving me a chance to read his story on the events of September 11, 2001. That Day in September is the first book I have ever read about that fateful day. I do have a fascination about actual events and to have the chance to feel what it was like to be there through the words of someone that was there is one that I will never pass up.That Day In September had me tearing up right from the beginning. I know what I was doing when the attack happened and it touch me then and it touch me again reading this book. Yet to read a first hand experience makes me realize how much different it was for me then for everyone in New York. I cannot even start to say what it was like to be working right next to the World Trade Center and hearing a loud boom.Mr. Van Why writes from the heart as he recounts his steps during the attack on the World Trade Center and the days and months that follow. Most of us may have suffered for a few days but those who live and work in New York saw the damage for months after the incident. They had a reminder of all the lives lost every day. There are parts of the book when Artie talks about strangers comforting each other and how he felt like New York had become like a family to him.Everyone of us should reflect and remember September 11, 2001 especially with the 10th anniversary so close upon us now. Take the time to read That Day in September and remember those lives lost.
kherbrand on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
There is no way to be analytical about this book because of the subject matter. This is an event that affected all Americans, regardless of where they lived, their race, religion, age. Artie Van Why tells us "This just happens to be my story. . . no more important or significant than yours. Just from my perspective. My experience." He was working in an office building across the street from the World Trade Center on that morning. He experienced first hand the unbelief, shock, devastation in the minutes and hours that followed. He experienced the grief, the courage, and the strength in the days and weeks and months that followed. He shares these experiences with the reader in That Day in September. He tells how these events have shaped his life since then, and have helped him keep life in perspective. This book needs to be shared, to show the strength of the survivors as well as to honor the victims and heros of that day. At 84 pages, it is a very quick read, but his story, and the events of that day, will be remembered for a long time.
PermaSwooned on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was nicely written, but really short. This truly focused ONLY on the personal experience of someone who worked near the WTC and evacuated relatively quickly and contributed nothing further. Well told, but not illuminating to anyone hoping to get a real view of the experience of that day.
JamesterCK on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I can still remember where I was when I heard the tragic news, as I'm sure most of you can. I was in sophomore year of high school and we watched the news that entire day, shedding tears for the people who lost their lives and for their families. As much as we can imagine what it would have been like to be there, we simply can't. The terror, the helplessness, the confusion. Wanting to help the people trapped inside the World Trade Center, but knowing that there is nothing you can do. This is why That Day In September is such a powerful book; the author, Artie Van Why was there and he experienced all of it first hand. He was working across from the World Trade Center when the first plane hit and in this book he gives a chilling and detailed account of what he experienced that day. The book jumps back and forth just a bit in the beginning, starting with when he first heard the news that a plane had hit one of the World Trade Center towers and then going back to describe just how he ended up in New York City in the first place. It was interesting to learn about his life and the events that lead up to him taking a job right across from the towers. I really appreciated his fond memories prior to the attacks. In particular he described the World Trade Center plaza as being an "oasis" for people who worked around the area. This was helpful for someone like me who has never visited New York City, much less the World Trade Center while it was still standing; through his memories I was able to form more of a connection and see exactly what everyone loved so much. Not only did he mourn the people who died that day, but he also mourned the loss of something he cherished very much: lunch time at the plaza, sitting by the beautiful fountain. We like to take things for granted and assume we'll always have them around; the author had no clue that his last day at the plaza would truly be his last. I found myself getting very emotional while reading. His emotions just jumped off the page and I couldn't help but cry with him. The things he witnessed that day, scenes that no one should ever have to see, he will carry those around for the rest of his life. That day ended up changing his life forever. The book also details the days and months after the attack and the difficulties he faced even then trying to cope with what happened. Returning to work he was faced with seeing the rubble and destruction, a reminder of exactly what happened. It was heartwarming to hear just how unified everyone in New York City was; how people he didn't even know would come right up and comfort him when the emotions and grief became too much to bear by himself. I can't describe how much I enjoyed reading this book. It's not especially long, but it touched me immensely. I recommend this book to everyone and know I will be purchasing a copy to display proudly on my shelf.
GRgenius on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I'm not going to rehash what the book covers in full because that should be fairly obvious however I will say that the author also inserts his personal life and reactions surrounding the time which takes away any potential clinical aspect it could have suffererd. The life experiences included help us to connect with the author on a more personal note and see this everyday person in the extreme circumstances they were placed. It does not become overly descriptive while still conveying the horrors seen all around. There is respect and courtesy used to honor not only the fallen but the events themselves. So many people were lost that day both physically and emotionally; so many were forced to make choices that no one should have to make and accept the consequences that were inevitable either way. The parting thoughts of the author had me on the brink of tears. So much strength and conviction, a renewed outlook on life...a seriously unexpected reprecussion of the events....we would be lucky to gain that much insight from our everyday lives let alone a tragedy of this magnitude.In summary, a touching look at the human spirit from both sides of possibility and a story of finding life (and the will to live it) again in spite of it all. A tough share, yes...but inspiring nonetheless.
eternal_synn on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
*deep sigh* This was a hard book to read and an even harder book to review. When faced with something like this, how can you so easily dissect it, analyze it, and determine it's value and merit? This book has left me utterly speechless; completely at a loss for words. "One of the pieces of falling debris seemed to be moving. It was moving, and it wasn't debris. It was a person falling, arms and legs waving madly." (22)This book was moving. With the images still playing in my mind from watching the new cast nearly 10 years ago, Artie's story adds flesh, detail, and humanity to the tragedy. What makes his story more profound is his personal experiences before the occurrences of that nightmare.After working for several years in a smaller law firm in NYC, the company Artie was a part of decided to merge with a large entity. This merger would place them on the 23rd floor of a building across the street from the World Trade Center. Living in NYC for over a decade, Artie had experience with the Center, but had never fully enjoyed it. Starting a few short months before the tragedy, Artie was given a chance to fully experience his new surroundings. He talks candidly about the coffee vendor across the street from Building 5, enjoying his paper and morning coffee on a stone bench in front of the World Trade Center fountain, his favorite bookstore in Building 5, and noontime concerts in the summer that would draw tourists and local business people. While I never had the opportunity to see the Trade Center while it was still standing, Artie's words made me feel as though I had.Being allowed to experience these happy moments with the author opens the reader up to a new level of understanding and an access not granted by the television screen. Reading about Artie's horrifying ordeal of watching person after person falling from the Towers onto a waiting pile of bodies, his run through the streets with over survivors, etc., puts the whole incident at a completely different level. "I can't bear to think of how many spouses, partners, parents, or friends received a call from a loved one that morning, telling them they were okay and were leaving their offices and never came home." (53)This book was moving and riveting. To say I didn't read it with a box of tissues nearby would be a lie. Even though I was moved by the events at the time, this story brought me to a deeper level of understanding and compassion. If you really want to understand the events of 9/11, read this book. Honestly, we owe it to ourselves to remember and not forget.
Amys_Bookshelf_Reviews More than 1 year ago
Powerful A story from the perspective of a 9/11 survivor. The first thing I think of was that I feel so honored to read this book, and share in this story. The second thing, is that a 11 days ago, was the 15th Anniversary of 9/11, and there must be a reason this book was among the many that I would read this September. I don't know if it's coincidence or happenstance, but I read the book, with the memories of that day in my head, just watching it as a bystander on television, feeling the sadness and the guilt of the sadness, because I am one person who was only affected by what it did to our country. I didn't know someone personally who was affected by this tragedy. Van Why shares his story, and not just that day, but his life. I am extremely touched by his words and am not giving this a 5 star because of the day but because of the words of Van Why. He survived, as a worker in building 5.
lanalucy More than 1 year ago
I was provided a copy of this book by Addicted to Books in exchange for an honest review. That Day In September is the story of a man who was not in the towers on 9/11, but nearby, and how that day affected his life in some profound ways. Not very polished.  The bits of the rest of his life that are in the book are pretty boring and take up too much of the very short book, but his accounts of the actual day are vivid enough that I had to stop reading more than once.  I liked that everything was personal to him - about him.  That day impacted each of us so differently and in so many ways. I liked that he related some of the following months and how interactions between people continued to be caring and compassionate, even to strangers. The book ends with Artie vow to himself to really live, and live how he wants, not just survive.  Seems pretty reasonable.   Life is short.  Live it. The book could have been better, but was fine for what it was.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Everything changed September 11,2001. The resulting pain and anguish will remain immeasurable. To watch the horror of the events of that day on TV was one thing. To have watched them first hand is another story. That Day in September written by Artie Van Why is his story of what happened that day and of the impact it left on him. Mr. Van Why moved to New York City in 1977 with hopes of becoming an actor. After years of working temp jobs he took a full time job with a firm that eventually merged with another firm. The merger led to a move that changed his work place to a building across the street from the World Trade Center. He came to love the World Trade Center. He drank his morning coffee while sitting on a bench close to the fountain. Lunch time outside gave him the opportunity to watch the ongoing theater. There were summer concerts and people danced. All that changed September 11, 2001. He writes " I don't remember which came first, the shudder of the buildings or the loud sound. They probably came at the same time." Mr. Van Why then describes in vivid detail what he saw once he came outside. People were jumping from the North Tower. The ground was covered with wreckage, glass and paper. Then the second plane struck the South Tower. Chaos and panic continued. He was able to make his way to Midtown where he lived. He describes the walk home: "A mass of silent humanity walking together." He slept with a light on that first night. He couldn't watch replays of the horrors of the day. He had seen it for himself. He eloquently explains what it was like to be in New York City after September 11,2011. This is a beautifully written book which encompasses so much emotion and insight that it is often heart wrenching to read. With incredible inner strength he manages to cope but thinks of the events of that day every day. He pays tribute to those who died and to those who tried to help save them. This is a moving book and can be read over and over. I received this book free of charge from Review the Book and I give this review of my own free will.
sleighanne More than 1 year ago
**I recieved this book from the author in exchange for an honest review.** "And to honor those that are gone, I will not forget to live." Memoirs and non-fiction are genres that I typically don't read. However, when this review request came into my inbox, I knew that it was something that I wanted to accept. It has been over a week since I've finished this book and I'm just now sitting to wrote down this review. I still don't have the right words to describe how this made me feel. I'm going to try, so just bear with me. Everyone remembers where they were September 11, 2001 when so many American's lost their lives. It was one of the greatest tragedies our country has ever seen, and we continue to mourn for those that were lost, even as the 10th anniversary approaches. Van Why's book is about his personal experiences on that day and the days that followed He worked in the building right across the street. He was there during the tragedy and during the rebuild. I don't usually get emotional about things, or about books. But this book hit me so very hard. When these attacks happened, I was in 8th grade. I didn't fully understand the loss that our country had suffered and it wasn't until I got older that I began to. I have avoided watching footage, reading things about it, because it makes me so very sad. This book really helped me to understand what people went through that day. Never before had I read a first hand account of a survivor of that day, and never before have I cried so much while I was reading a book. When you're reading a work of fiction, you can sympathize with the characters, you can get to like or love them and you can think "Wow, that would be crazy if that happened to someone." This did happen to someone. And reading Artie's personal experiences just made it super emotional for me. As I sit back and read what I've written thus far, I know I can't do it justice. I can just tell you that you should read it. It's a short read, you could probably read it in one sitting, but I promise that you won't forget it that quickly. I think this is a must read. I'd like to thank Artie again for contacting me to review this book, and thank him for having the courage to write it.
HamptonReviews More than 1 year ago
We all have our stories to tell of where we were the morning of September 11, 2001. This is one of them. In "That Day In September" Artie Van Why gives an eyewitness account of that fateful morning. From the moment he heard "a loud boom" in his office across from the World Trade Center, to stepping out onto the street, Artie vividly transports the reader back to the day that changed our lives and our country forever. "That Day In September" takes you beyond the events of that morning. By sharing his thoughts, fears and hopes, Artie expresses what it was like to be in New York City in the weeks and months following. The reader comes away from "That Day In September" with not only a more intimate understanding of the events of that day but also with a personal glimpse of how one person's life was dramatically changed forever.
kherbrand More than 1 year ago
There is no way to be analytical about this book because of the subject matter. This is an event that affected all Americans, regardless of where they lived, their race, religion, age. Artie Van Why tells us "This just happens to be my story. . . no more important or significant than yours. Just from my perspective. My experience." He was working in an office building across the street from the World Trade Center on that morning. He experienced first hand the unbelief, shock, devastation in the minutes and hours that followed. He experienced the grief, the courage, and the strength in the days and weeks and months that followed. He shares these experiences with the reader in That Day in September. He tells how these events have shaped his life since then, and have helped him keep life in perspective. This book needs to be shared, to show the strength of the survivors as well as to honor the victims and heros of that day. At 84 pages, it is a very quick read, but his story, and the events of that day, will be remembered for a long time.
Tribute_Books_Reviews More than 1 year ago
It was, in fact, one of those moments in which history splits, and we define the world as ''before'' and ''after.'' -New York Times, September 12, 2001 Without question, 9/11 stands as the defining moment of the 21st century. It is a day that rocked the United States to its very core. Everyone has a story to tell about where they were and what they were doing on that monumental date, but nothing can compare to the accounts from the actual eyewitnesses. Ordinary people who were at the World Trade Center and saw - not on a TV screen, but with their own eyes - the death and destruction that unfolded around them. It is imperative for history's sake that their testimonies are preserved for the better understanding of future generations. Artie Van Why was there, and of his own initiative, published his firsthand account in That Day in September. Van Why's story isn't headline grabbing. It's not the stuff movies are made of. And that's what makes it powerful. It is the kind of story that usually gets lost in the rubble. It is how thousands of everyday working people experienced the events around the World Trade Center. Van Why shows what it felt like to be on the ground during a turning point in history. For him, it started as just another day on the job. How did he arrive at this place? As a one-time struggling actor, he was a word processor working for a law firm across from the World Trade Center. A law firm that ironically moved to the location just three months before 9/11. Fate places us where it will, and Van Why is no exception. To make sense of the trauma, he turned his horrific memories into a written record of what it was like to be there so that others could get a more complete picture of what really happened that day. But what really changed for Van Why was his mindset. He would no longer live his life on autopilot. He wouldn't settle. He would make his own decisions about his destiny. Those that died were not granted that opportunity, and he would live the remainder of his life in honor of their sacrifice. He would not take things for granted and would live life to the fullest. And that he did. Encouraged by friends and family to turn his emails from that time period into something larger in scope, he initially wrote That Day in September as a one-man play that ran in Los Angeles and off-Broadway in New York. Now a self-published book endorsed by the Los Angeles Times (not an easy feat), That Day in September is a wonderfully written personal account told in under 100 pages with 17 fast-paced chapters.
KrittersRamblings More than 1 year ago
An emotional read that takes you to street level as to what happened on that day and the days following. As a viewer from afar, I ached for New York City, but never completely understood the impact it had to the person on the street. I found that perspective through this book. With a little back story as to how Artie ended up across the street from the Towers on the day of the attacks, I enjoyed finding out how he ended up on that street on that day. The way he described what he saw, I felt as though I was right beside him that morning from before the attacks happened to running for his life and then walking the many blocks to his apartment. I saw all of this on tv on that day and the days to follow, but to read it - I really felt the emotion of running for your life. A novellette that will take you on the journey to days and years of New York City before the towers came down to the days and years after. You see and feel how this one city became a city of survivors that would cling to each other to grieve for their loss.
JamesterCK More than 1 year ago
I can still remember where I was when I heard the tragic news, as I'm sure most of you can. I was in sophomore year of high school and we watched the news that entire day, shedding tears for the people who lost their lives and for their families. As much as we can imagine what it would have been like to be there, we simply can't. The terror, the helplessness, the confusion. Wanting to help the people trapped inside the World Trade Center, but knowing that there is nothing you can do. This is why That Day In September is such a powerful book; the author, Artie Van Why was there and he experienced all of it first hand. He was working across from the World Trade Center when the first plane hit and in this book he gives a chilling and detailed account of what he experienced that day. The book jumps back and forth just a bit in the beginning, starting with when he first heard the news that a plane had hit one of the World Trade Center towers and then going back to describe just how he ended up in New York City in the first place. It was interesting to learn about his life and the events that lead up to him taking a job right across from the towers. I really appreciated his fond memories prior to the attacks. In particular he described the World Trade Center plaza as being an "oasis" for people who worked around the area. This was helpful for someone like me who has never visited New York City, much less the World Trade Center while it was still standing; through his memories I was able to form more of a connection and see exactly what everyone loved so much. Not only did he mourn the people who died that day, but he also mourned the loss of something he cherished very much: lunch time at the plaza, sitting by the beautiful fountain. We like to take things for granted and assume we'll always have them around; the author had no clue that his last day at the plaza would truly be his last. I found myself getting very emotional while reading. His emotions just jumped off the page and I couldn't help but cry with him. The things he witnessed that day, scenes that no one should ever have to see, he will carry those around for the rest of his life. That day ended up changing his life forever. The book also details the days and months after the attack and the difficulties he faced even then trying to cope with what happened. Returning to work he was faced with seeing the rubble and destruction, a reminder of exactly what happened. It was heartwarming to hear just how unified everyone in New York City was; how people he didn't even know would come right up and comfort him when the emotions and grief became too much to bear by himself. I can't describe how much I enjoyed reading this book. It's not especially long, but it touched me immensely. I recommend this book to everyone and know I will be purchasing a copy to display proudly on my shelf.
l_manning More than 1 year ago
I think almost everyone can remember where they were on September 11, 2001. I can remember exactly what I was doing when I heard about the first plane and the confusion about what was going on. I can remember how my heart sank as the reality of the situation hit me. I can remember the horror of watching it all unfold on television. New York City is a city I love, and I could never imagine having been there on that day. Artie Van Why doesn't have to wonder because he knows. He was there. This book is his story. There is some back story about the author that explains how and why he was so close to what happened that day. However, the real story is his retelling of what happened that day. There are so many details that were things that had also stuck out to me as I remember that day. However, reading it by someone who was there, who felt everything as it happened, is not easy. The author does a wonderful job of being descriptive without being graphic. The further we get away from the actual day, the more it feels like people seem to forget what it was like that day. Artie Van Why never will. His life was forever changed by what happened then. So many people's lives were changed, and we should never forget that. I almost feel like this book should be required reading to try to understand what it felt like to be there. I hope that everyone will take a chance to read this book and truly remember. It's not long, but it tells a lot of story in a those pages. I highly recommend this book and hope everyone will take a chance to read it. Book provided by author for review.
Countrysunset More than 1 year ago
This is a story of memories of life before "That Day In September" and how life has changed in the time after. Artie Van Why was one of the ones who has made it through living through the chaos and tragedy that happened on that fateful morning of 9/11. This is his personal reflection on how he came to be in that place at that particular time and how he has struggled to get through the aftermath of what he witnessed and survived on that day. Come share in his story as he relates how life was before when he was young and beginning his adulthood and career to the point when tragedy struck which totally changed his perspective and outlook on life. Everyone has memories of where they were or what they were doing on September 11, 2001. This book just really brings that all flooding back as you are gripped into it, page by page. Mr. Van Why has really written such an honest and open account of his life during this time that you can't help but be moved by it. I totally applaud his sharing of this very personal story! I would highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys personal looks at other's lives and how certain events can have such a changing effect on them. "That Day In September" is a must read! This book was kindly provided to me by it's wonderful author for my honest review.
Icecream18 More than 1 year ago
It would be impossible to forget your exact location on September 11th. This novel details the author's survival on that day and why he was in the area. The reader will enjoy reading about the author's background and personal feelings leading up to that fateful day. He was in an office right across the street from the World Trade Center. The reader delves into Artie's mind as he processes the events occurring right outside his office. The scene is tangible, the reader will feel the chaos and the fear. The author describes the scene vividly, like "stepping into a snowstorm." He describes how he felt and the horror of watching people jump from the building, legs and arms flailing. The author enables the reader to truly feel the high adrenaline and emotion-packed day of September 11, a day that is to be remembered in the hearts of every American. The author reveals his wish that this day live on in remembrance of those brave people who were killed that day. The novel is Artie's way of dealing with the pain of the situation. This novel is recommended for teens/young adults/adults.
skstiles612 More than 1 year ago
Artie Van Why's novel "That Day In September" is one of those books that will stay with you for a long time after you read it. I know there will be many who won't read a book like this because they just want to forget the events of that day. I don't and I can't. To me forgetting the events is like forgetting all of those who perished that day. Artie gives us a first hand, eyewitness look at that day. In many ways his story is the same as others we may have heard or read about. In many ways it is different. Everyone was affected differently that day. For many who lived in New York and witnessed first hand the terror, the events are permanently etched in their minds. Some of them may have been able to move on with their lives, and many of them have been so affected by that day that it was necessary to move away. Artie gives us a look into his life before and after 9/11. I cried throughout this book. I brought back so many emotions and thoughts. We carried our emotions on our sleeves for months. On pages 53- 54 of his book he is talking about finding out that two young men in his apartment building had been victims of this day and how doing simple things such as buy flowers to be placed on the table at the memorial set up in the lobby of their building was a way to grieve those he did not personally know yet felt a connection to. Many of us grieved for those we did not know that lost their life that day. It was and is a part of the healing process. This book brought back all of those raw feelings and emotions in me. That is not a bad thing. The healing process takes years. It doesn't mean we are stuck in a situation it means we still care deeply about those things. Reading books like Artie's makes us realize that we were all there that day even if we were not standing on a corner across from the Towers or Pentagon. Emotionally we were all there and it changed all of us. Artie gives us a look into his own life and how it changed him. I challenge you to read this book and see the connections with your own life. I will tell you right now. If you are like me you need to make sure you have a box of tissues handy. I will recommend this book to all of my friends. It is one of the better stories of 9/11 I have read. It gives us a glimpse into the effect emotionally, socially, and professionally that these events had on people like you and I. If I awarded stars on my blog this would definitely be a 5 star book.
JanetteFuller More than 1 year ago
Most people remember exactly where they were and what they were doing on the morning of September 11, 2001. Artie Van Why shares his personal story of the events of that terrible day in "That Day In September". This is a compelling memoir about how Mr. Van Why came to live in New York City and was working near the World Trade Center in a building across the street from the Twin Towers. His experiences at Ground Zero were shocking and unforgettable. This is one man's story of how he survived a day that will never be forgotten. Artie Van Why moved to New York City in November of 1977 to pursue an acting career. He tells of his relationship with an actress before "coming out" and living an openly gay lifestyle. He soon realized that he would need more income than he was receiving from his acting jobs, so he went to work as a word processor at a law firm. He worked the evening shift and then would party with his friends until the early morning hours. In 1999, Mr. Van Why decided to give up drinking and make some serious changes in his life. He attended a twelve-steps support group and was able to gain control of his drinking and his life. The law firm merged with another company and he found himself working the day shift in an office building across the street from the World Trade Center. Life was good. Artie heard the building rumble. A secretary said that a plane had hit the South Tower and it was a "war zone" outside. Artie and some of his co-workers were curious so they went outside to see what was happening. Once he was on the street, he noticed that it was like stepping into a snowstorm. Paper of all sorts and sizes was scattered everywhere, coming down from the sky from as far up as he could see. Large pieces of debris were falling down the length of the tower. Then he noticed that one piece of debris seemed to be moving. It was a person falling...arms and legs waving madly. He stood helplessly watching as more and more people began jumping from the tower. "That Day In September" is a book that will give you details that were not covered on the television news. I think Mr. Van Why has done an outstanding job sharing his experience of that terrible day in September. He felt the panic and fear of running for his life as debris fell from the sky. These memories continued to haunt him for many years. This book is his way of working through this trauma. His hope is that our country will not forget all those who lost their lives on that day. Read the book and weep.