The Absolutely, Positively No Princesses Book

The Absolutely, Positively No Princesses Book

Hardcover

$16.99
Members save with free shipping everyday! 
See details

Overview

Some kids like frills and sparkles and bows and lots of pink. And some don't. The girl who started "The Absolutely, Positively No Princess Book" is sure that she wants a story full of nature and adventure. But when a princess barges into the pages with her own opinions about what makes for a good story, the two learn that they each have something to offer. Together they make the best story of all.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781939547514
Publisher: Creston Books
Publication date: 01/01/2019
Pages: 36
Sales rank: 1,013,419
Product dimensions: 7.50(w) x 7.50(h) x (d)
Age Range: 7 - 8 Years

About the Author

Ian Lendler is the author of several picture books including An Undone Fairy Tale, Little Sid, and Saturday. He also wrote the graphic novel series, The Stratford Zoo Presents... Sadly, he does not look good in a tutu or a tiara. You can read more about him at www.ianlendler.com.


Deborah Zemke grew up near Detroit, Michigan. She has written and illustrated many books for young readers. She currently lives in Columbia, Missouri. Learn more about Deborah at www.deborahzemke.com.

What People are Saying About This

author of The One and Only Ivan - Katherine Applegate

"A laugh-out-loud tale of a most unlikely friendship, delivered in a fresh and clever format. Witty, endearing, and absolutely, positively charming."

Bestelling author and founder of The Lazy Readers' Book Club - Danny Brassell

“Hilarious text compliments terrific illustrations in this romp that is sure to be a read-aloud classic for any school, classroom or home library. Your child will laugh and eagerly turn the pages in this clever and ultimately highly gratifying story about friendship.”

Director of Library Services, Walworth Barbour American International School - Ilana Locker

"This book gets to the heart of what's really important in a zany and engaging way!"

Ms.Hennick's 3rd grade class

A funny, kind, story that reminds you that you can't judge a person, or a book, by its a cover. The book reminds you to celebrate our differences and that friendship makes the world a better place.

Reading Group Guide

Curriculum Guide

The Absolutely Positively No Princesses Book by Ian Lendler, illustrated by Deborah Zemke
Isbn 9781939547514

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.2.3,4,4a,4c,5,5a,5b,6; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.2.3,4,4a,4c; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.2.1,2,3,5,6,7,10; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.2.1,1b,2,3,4,6; CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.2.1,3,5,8


Some kids like frills and sparkles and bows and lots of pink. And some don’t. The girl who started The Absolutely Positively No Princesses Book is sure that she wants a story full of nature and adventure. But when a princess barges into the pages with her own opinions about what makes for a good story, the two learn that they each have something to offer. Together they make the best story of all.

Can you judge a book – or a person – by its cover? What assumptions does Lita make about LaDeeDa? What does she think princesses act like? What assumptions does LaDeeDa make about Lita? How does she want to change Lita? How are they right? How are they wrong?

What is your first impression of LaDeeDa? How do you feel differently about her at the end of the book than you did at the beginning? Is she a selfish princess who says, “Me, my, mine”?

What is your first impression of Lita? How do you feel differently about her at the end of the book than you did at the beginning? Does she do anything that she thinks only princesses do?

What's expected about this story? What's unexpected? What is the problem that Lita and LaDeeDa face? How is the problem solved?

Differences in points of view: How would you tell this story from Lita's point of view? From LaDeeDa's? From the mountain lion's? From the dragon's? Write your version of the story from one of the other character's point of view. Have fun with seeing the changes between the different versions.

How do the pictures help tell the story? Give an example of something that's shown in the art that isn't said in words. Draw your own illustrations to one these pages and see how different you can be from what the illustrator, Deborah Zemke, does. For example, the page where Lita yells, “Mine! Mine! Mine!” Or the last page where the only word is “Friends.” How would you show Lita and LaDeeDa being friends?

Who caused the problem? How is it resolved?

Write a sentence or two that sums up what the book is about. Is it about making your own book? Is it about friendship? Is it about learning to listen and see someone clearly instead of making assumptions about them?

What happens when the two girls appreciate their differences rather than trying to make the other one more like themselves? Do you have to be like somebody to be their friend? Describe a situation when you became friends with somebody whom you thought at first could never be your friend? Draw your friend as you first “saw” them. Then draw them as you see them now that you know them better.

Make a list of what's important to you in a friend.
Now make a list of the things that don't matter.

If you were making your own book, all about YOU, what would it be about? What things would you want to draw to describe your interests?

Customer Reviews