The Academie

The Academie

by Susanne Dunlap

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781599905860
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
Publication date: 02/28/2012
Pages: 368
Product dimensions: 2.30(w) x 4.80(h) x 18.90(d)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Susanne Dunlap graduated from Smith College and later earned a PhD in music history from Yale University. She is the author of two historical novels for adults and three novels for teens: The Musician's Daughter, Anastasia's Secret, and In the Shadow of the Lamp.
www.susannedunlap.com

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The Academie 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
DanicaPage More than 1 year ago
My Overall Thoughts/Impressions: First off, I'd like to thank the publisher and netgalley for allowing me to review this novel. Secondly, I've only read one other novel by this author and I loved it. This is an author that I definitely recommend to fans of historical fiction. She blends just the right amount of fiction and historical accuracy to create a very compelling read. Going into this novel, I wondered if this would live up to my expectations or if I would end up being disappointed. This novel definitely surpassed my expectations and reminded me of why I love this author so much. She has a way with words that leaves you completely entranced by the story. My favorite aspect of a Dunlap novel is the characters and their distinct voices. I always feel so connected with the characters and emotionally attached. I cheer for their triumphs, smile when they are happy, and feel tearful when they run into heartbreak. Dunlap is an incredible writer whom I am quickly coming to love. Her writing is fresh, compelling, and always sincere. I loved the character Eliza. Her naivete was always amusing. And yet, her desire to help other people was something that I admired. This novel touched upon issues of race, wealth and class distinctions, and government. And yet it was presented in a neat package that is entertaining and both thought-provoking. Any book that can do that is one I love. I can say with absolutely certainly this won't be the last novel I read by Dunlap. In Summary: A very imaginative blend of history and fiction into a novel that I absolutely adored and recommend to all fans of historical young adult fiction. Warnings/Side-notes: Nothing comes to mind. The Wrap-Up: A novel that I thoroughly enjoyed reading. I'm definitely excited to read more from this author. In fact, this is a novel that I would even reread and consider purchasing.
summerskris on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Academie starts with a good historical premise. Three girls, all related to powerful historical figures, thrown together at a school for young women? It makes you wonder what will happen, especially as the events of the novel take place soon after the French Revolution and right around the time that Napoleon Bonaparte plotted to overthrow the Directoire. Big changes are brewing in France at the same time that the girls play a game of politics with one another, each girl acting with her best interests in mind and guessing at the other girls' motives. It was interesting seeing events take place through the eyes of three very different girls: Eliza and Hortense in addition to Madeleine, the daughter of an actress who will get entangled in the politics of the aristocrats. This has promising potential; however, the novel's set up makes it hard to get into the plot.The first-person narrative as told through three different perspective makes it hard to follow events clearly and even more so to relate to the characters. Each girl has her own thoughts and observations, and they see the same people in different lights. They also believe that they know what's best for other characters and will act for other people's "best interests" when their actions really end up hurting them. Just when I thought I had formed my opinion on a character, the narrative would switch to another girl and I would see the aforementioned character in another light. Because the narrative switches perspectives so often, I didn't get to know the girls as well as I would have liked, and sometimes the narrative would replay an event from another person's perspective, which felt redundant despite the new angle the present narrator offered.I was very much interested in the politics of the aristocratic world. Initially, Hortense and Caroline exihibit much distaste for one another, something that is no big secret; yet, they must act in a certain manner with each other in public. The novel could have easily explored much more of the intricacies of the nobility. However, rather than focusing on the intrigue and politics of the girls' worlds, the story spends much of its time exploring the girls' romantic interests. The promise of romance is the girls' primary motivation factor. Eliza is interested in Hortense's brother, who loves the actress Madeleine. At the same time, Hortense develops feelings for the musician Michel, and Caroline wishes to marry the general Murat. Love drives the girls to do lose reason and do silly things like dress up as soldiers to go to where they know something big will happen, but not what exactly.The plot is slow to unfold. A quarter into the novel, I considered dropping it because it didn't seem like anything was going to happen, though I finally finished the book because I read the last couple pages and wanted to see what happened in between. Not much ended ended up happening. As I mentioned earlier, much of the book is about the girls falling in love, with each girl finding a different resolution. There is joy, there is resignation, and there is tragedy. There is a fair amount of fiction in this novel, but there is also realness in the characters' humanity. While this is far from the best historical fiction that I've read, it is rather light-hearted for the topic that it addresses and may interest readers looking for a light summer read with romance and scandal but nothing a parent wouldn't let a middle-grade student read.
yearningtoread on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
SUMMARY -Eliza Monroe - daughter of America, innocent and young, desiring romance and handsome generals, wanting to be accepted.Hortense de Beauharnais - daughter of Josephine Bonaparte, beautiful young woman, one who loves deeply, one who has a secret she cannot deny, but must try to escape from.Madeleine - actress in the Comedie Francaise, treated like a slave by her own famous mother, in love with the son of Josephine Bonaparte, waiting for someone to take her away.Three girls, three paths of life, intertwined and tangled. When thrown together, their lives will never be the same.MY THOUGHTS -I was hoping to love this book...but even though I didn't, its still a good historical fiction that I enjoyed. It started out with 5-star material, and ended 3 star. But that's not bad. I appreciate it for what it was. However, there were definitely some major points that stopped me from loving the story. One thing was Susanne Dunlap's style. i was okay with telling apart three 1st person voices...until they were all thrown together into the same place. For the last 100 pages they were frustratingly similar.CHARACTER NOTES -Eliza, Hortense, Madeleine, Caroline, Josephine, Napoleon, Eugene.... The list goes on. This is one large cast. Surprisingly, it wasn't hard to keep track, except maybe a little with Josephine and Caroline. Caroline is Napoleon's sister, and Josephine is married to Napoleon, and has two kids - Hortese and Eugene - from a different way. So...in a way, Caroline is Hortese's step-aunt. But they're around the same age. This could have been super confusing, but it was only a tiny bit confusing at first, and as time went on it got easier to understand. I appreciate this very very much.Putting that mess aside, I really did like most of the characters because they were human. Eliza was a brat, doing the most infuriating things until finally she saw sense. (So don't give up on her!) Madeleine was mysterious...I suspected the twist about her at the end but wasn't too sure.Hortense and Eugene, siblings, step-children of Napoleon, were by far my favorites. They were consistent, selfless, and people I could relate to because they weren't all about the ridiculous society rules that their parents/cousins followed.Caroline was fascinating, but less consistent and I felt there were holes about her development in the end. She changed suddenly, it seemed. But maybe it was just my perception.STORY NOTES -I like historical books that have reality and fiction mixed together. So, while Eliza, the Bonapartes, and all the stuff about France were real, Madeleine and Eugene and the events surrounding them were fabricated. I found this interesting and it kept my attention throughout.For the most part I was totally glued to the story, but there were a few anticlimactic scenes that should have been riveting. The outcomes (Eliza's first kiss - which was weird, for who she kissed - Hortense's visit to the music teacher's house, and Caroline just disappearing) made me go, "Wait, where were we?"I didn't love the climax because 1. it seemed a bit pointless; and 2. it was SO SAD. Thinking about it even now, I can't help but shudder at the thought of the events. However, the very end did sum up the story well and I liked the lessons the characters learned from their experiences.SUMMING IT UP -A good mix of real life and good story-telling. I wish it had been better, but that's just me. I'm sure tons of readers will eat this book up like a gourmet dessert. And if I happen to come across one of Dunlap's other books, I'll definitely give it a try!For the Parents -A kiss or two, talk of affairs/lovers; an antagonist is addicted to opium; some brief but very saddening violence. Recommended 12+*This ARC copy was provided by NetGalley (thanks a million!!) in return for an honest review. I was in no way compensated; all thoughts and feelings expressed are my own.*
AboutToRead on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Academie was a really enjoyable read. There was a lot of intrigue and a bit of romance. While there was nothing epic about the romance, the light-hearted way the girls interacted with each other made for a fun light read.I really enjoy historical fiction and I have always been fascinated by the French Revolution¿but I haven¿t found a lot of YA historical novels about that topic. The Academie takes place in the post French Revolution era, but is still fascinating to read about. My absolute favorite part of The Academie was the ending, and it¿s really what made the novel for me. It was shocking, tragic, and unexpected! I truly don¿t think I¿ll ever be able to forget this ending it was so¿surprising.A great pick for historical fiction fans, The Academie is a light, quick read full of the typical intrigues you find in historical novels. While there is a lot of romance, none of the couples are particularly swoon worthy. What really makes this book shine is the ending¿I still can¿t believe it!
ahandfulofconfetti on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Thank you to Bloomsbury Children's Books (via NetGalley) for the e-galley of The Académie.It's hard to really describe what this book is about. The story takes place in France in the Fall of 1799, right before Napoleon Bonaparte overthrew the French Directory, who was ruling France after the French Revolution. The author used the setting of an all girls school in Saint-Germain called The Academie to tell what was happening in France during this time period through the eyes of three young girls. The story is told via three different point of views: Eliza Monroe, daughter of the future President of the United States, Hortense de Beauharnais, step-daughter of Napoleon Bonaparte, and Madeleine de Pourat, a fictitious daughter of a fictitious Creole actress at the Comedie Francaise. Eliza, Hortense, and Caroline Bonaparte (Napoleon's sister) all attend the school together, and set out on many adventures, several of which don't achieve the hoped-for outcome. Madeleine is involved simply because she is in love with Hortense's brother, but she doesn't meet either Eliza or Hortense until almost 70% through the book.I am sort of mixed in my opinion of this book. I felt like the first half was really slow-moving, as the author tried to introduce the characters and let the reader know how they were all connected. I felt sorry for Hortense from the first; Caroline is openly vindictive and treats her terribly, simply because she doesn't like Hortense's mother. Eliza's narration is suitably young - she is only 14 - but I found her incredibly grating. She's selfish, arrogant and easily manipulated by Caroline, and I found her constant cataloging of what was happening as being good fodder for letters to her mother quite annoying. I felt horribly sad for Madeleine, who has the worst time of it by far than any of the other characters, and enjoyed reading her chapters the most.And then, the second half of the book happens. It definitely picked up, and you could see the plot lines coming to a head. At times I was almost breathless with what was going on. But the feeling the book left me with was sort of one of disappointment. It wasn't that I thought that these couples (aside from Caroline) were going to be able to stay together or whatever - I know my history, thanks to Wikipedia (LOL) - but I wasn't expecting everything to end in the manner it did. I was quite shocked with the climax.And while we're talking about couples, let me just say that all of this "love at first sight" stuff that was going on was a little ridiculous. Also, I was really unhappy with Hortense at the end; I mentioned that I felt bad for her above, but by the end of the book found her to be just as selfish in her own way as all the others. Her actions left me with a bad taste in my mouth.All in all, this was an okay book. It's an interesting snapshot in French history, and I enjoyed parts of it immensely and others much less so. But it definitely wasn't a favorite.
Amy-T More than 1 year ago
THE ACADÉMIE has a solid premise, friends, and it takes place during one of the more interesting--and one of my personal favorite--historical periods: Napoleonic France. I LOVE reading about the society and the politics and how basically the Bonapartes sound kind of like a stereotypical mafia family, except with less murder and more political scheming. There's so much SCANDAL about them, guys, and that makes them JUICY to read about. And for the most part, reading about Napoleon's sister, Caroline, step-daughter, Hortense, and their school friend Eliza Monroe, was interesting in a history nerd way. But THE ACADÉMIE didn't quite meet my expectations. *Sad face* I'll start with the things I liked. The historical setting is awesome. I just love this time period! And really, reading about Napoleon and his immediate family as well as his wife and step-children and the way they interact with each other is fascinating and backstabby and brimming with barely-veiled distaste. I wish we had gotten a bit more of this, to be honest, but there was lots of good family politics in THE ACADÉMIE. The pacing improved after the half-way point, when things really started happening. There's lots of plans and action and THINGS going on. All of the plot threads start to weave together. It might have seemed still a little scattered and hasty, but it was more exciting than the first half, which I thought lagged a bit. There were also some very likable characters, too: Eugene, Hortense's brother, was very endearing and sweet. I wish we could have seen more of him. He seemed a little more well-rounded than some other characters, who came off kind of flat to me. And I enjoyed reading about the Bonapartes, especially Napoleon's mother, who seemed like a major beyotch. I think it would have been fun to see her a little bit more as well. Madeleine, the young actress living with her MONSTROUS mother, was an empathetic character who wound up having quite a bit of mettle. Alas, all of these things that I liked couldn't really make up for some other things that I didn't like as much. For instance, our girl Eliza. Eliza is IRRITATING. Also superficial, snobby, childish, and kind of ridiculous. Granted, she's only 14, and props for having her ACT her age, but she still made me roll my eyes A LOT. It was hard to connect with her when she's being a brat to the servants and basically hoping that something scandalous will happen so that she can go write a letter about it to her mother. Hortense is a good character, but kind of flat, and some of the things she gets herself into were either weird (her mildly uncomfortable relationship with her step-father) or seemed out of character for her (her attachment to Michel, and her role in her brother Eugene's relationship). But I certainly empathized with Hortense. Caroline, on the other hand, seemed to be a little bit more well-rounded, what with her love for her brother's general, Murat. But mostly she was the bad guy. There was a little confusion at the end there, when she seemed to turn around a little bit, but then I think we were supposed to assume that she had only been faking her turn to the good side? I'm not sure. In any case, she didn't have a very likable personality, which I usually have no problem with. Lots of times villains are the most intriguing characters, but something about Caroline just made her seem manipulative and mean. Boo. Things happen, too, as the book winds down but they never seem fleshed out someh
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was so good i need it for my bookshelf
ImaginaryReads More than 1 year ago
The Académie starts with a good historical premise. Three girls, all related to powerful historical figures, thrown together at a school for young women? It makes you wonder what will happen, especially as the events of the novel take place soon after the French Revolution and right around the time that Napoleon Bonaparte plotted to overthrow the Directoire. Big changes are brewing in France at the same time that the girls play a game of politics with one another, each girl acting with her best interests in mind and guessing at the other girls' motives. It was interesting seeing events take place through the eyes of three very different girls: Eliza and Hortense in addition to Madeleine, the daughter of an actress who will get entangled in the politics of the aristocrats. This has promising potential; however, the novel's set up makes it hard to get into the plot. The first-person narrative as told through three different perspective makes it hard to follow events clearly and even more so to relate to the characters. Each girl has her own thoughts and observations, and they see the same people in different lights. They also believe that they know what's best for other characters and will act for other people's "best interests" when their actions really end up hurting them. Just when I thought I had formed my opinion on a character, the narrative would switch to another girl and I would see the aforementioned character in another light. Because the narrative switches perspectives so often, I didn't get to know the girls as well as I would have liked, and sometimes the narrative would replay an event from another person's perspective, which felt redundant despite the new angle the present narrator offered. I was very much interested in the politics of the aristocratic world. Initially, Hortense and Caroline exihibit much distaste for one another, something that is no big secret; yet, they must act in a certain manner with each other in public. The novel could have easily explored much more of the intricacies of the nobility. However, rather than focusing on the intrigue and politics of the girls' worlds, the story spends much of its time exploring the girls' romantic interests. The promise of romance is the girls' primary motivation factor. Eliza is interested in Hortense's brother, who loves the actress Madeleine. At the same time, Hortense develops feelings for the musician Michel, and Caroline wishes to marry the general Murat. Love drives the girls to do lose reason and do silly things like dress up as soldiers to go to where they know something big will happen, but not what exactly. The plot is slow to unfold. A quarter into the novel, I considered dropping it because it didn't seem like anything was going to happen, though I finally finished the book because I read the last couple pages and wanted to see what happened in between. Not much ended ended up happening. As I mentioned earlier, much of the book is about the girls falling in love, with each girl finding a different resolution. There is joy, there is resignation, and there is tragedy. There is a fair amount of fiction in this novel, but there is also realness in the characters' humanity. While this is far from the best historical fiction that I've read, it is rather light-hearted for the topic that it addresses and may interest readers looking for a light summer read with romance and scandal but nothing a parent wouldn't let a middle-grade student read.
pagese More than 1 year ago
I love historical fiction and while I've never read anything else by this author, that fact alone was enough for me to want to read it. Sadly this book did not live up to my expectations. I was excited about the fact that this contained characters who were connected to some very powerful men. What were their lives like? Maybe I need to remind myself that in all honesty, they are teenage girls. But they came across as so petty and self absorbed in this book. They pay no attention to how their actions affect others. I wondered if their stations in life made them believe that they could do whatever they wanted. That being said, they weren't all bad. Eliza had the most potential and I really think she learned to look beyond what was handed to her. She didn't start of the book that way, so I was pleased to see her progression. I was the least able to connect with Hortense. It's almost like she's use to being second to everybody around her so the book takes very little focus on her. I wish it wasn't that way because I think she might have had the most interesting story to tell. I never really warmed up to Caroline. She seemed calculating from the very beginning and I don't think she every changed her colors. I enjoyed the political changes throughout this book. While the girls make the change in power seem like a trifle thing, I understand what's really happening. I don't think they fully understood what it all meant (another way they were completely self absorbed). Since it didn't really pertain to them, it didn't really matter. I have another one of her books on my shelves and this one makes me hesitant to pick it up. I'm willing to give it a shot since it's a subject that I much more familiar with. I don't regret reading this one, it just wasn't all that I wanted it to be.