Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

by Mark Twain

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Overview

This classic novel has been abridged and adapted into 10 illustrated chapters. This format is ideal for bilingual education - people learning English as a second language (ESL),  English Language Learners (ELL), people of any age intending to improve reading skills and students for whom the original version would be too long or difficult. This learning product is high-interest, low-readability. Readers of this version will improve comprehension, fluency and vocabulary.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780848111298
Publisher: EDCON Publishing Group
Publication date: 02/15/2012
Series: Bring the Classics to Life Series
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 56
File size: 3 MB
Age Range: 7 Years

About the Author

In a small Missouri town in the year 1835, Mark Twain was born, Samuel Langhorn Clemens. As a young man, he piloted river steamers along the Mississippi River. Later, he began to write short stories for newspapers. Some of his novels include, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, Life on the Mississippi, and The Prince and the Pauper. His novels, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn reflect many of his own boyhood experiences.

Date of Birth:

November 30, 1835

Date of Death:

April 21, 1910

Place of Birth:

Florida, Missouri

Place of Death:

Redding, Connecticut

Read an Excerpt

Do you know me? I'm Huck Finn. I was in THE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER. That book was made by Mark Twain. He told the truth, mainly. He did stretch some parts. That's nothing. I never heard of people who always told the truth. Well, now that I say that, Aunt Polly and the Widow do. They are in the book, too. The book is mainly the truth. It's made with some stretchers. But I said that before. Now the book stops when Tom and I get rich. Judge Thatcher keeps the money for us. But he'll give us a little of it any time we want. The Widow said she'd give me a home. She said she'd help me do good with my schooling and such. She was pretty good herself and was nice as could be. I tried to be good

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
Samuel Clemens/Mark Twain: A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Text

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Appendix A: Related Mark Twain Texts

  1. “A True Story Reprinted Word for Word as I Heard It,” The Atlantic Monthly (November 1874)
  2. From The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876)
  3. From Life on the Mississippi (1883)
  4. “Jim’s Ghost Story,” excluded manuscript passage from Huckleberry Finn (1876)
  5. Sequel to Huckleberry Finn, from Tom Sawyer Abroad (1894)
  6. Introducing Huckleberry Finn (1895)
  7. From “Chapters from My Autobiography, XIII,” North American Review (March 1907)

Appendix B: Contemporary Representations of Slavery and Race

  1. From “The Negro Out of Politics,” Chicago Tribune (24 April 1877)
  2. Blackface Minstrelsy (1880, 1884)
  3. “Tom Shows” (1882)
  4. From Thomas Nelson Page, “Mars Chan,” Century Magazine (April 1884)
  5. From George Washington Cable, “The Freedman’s Case in Equity,” Century Magazine (January 1885)

Appendix C: Illustrating Huckleberry Finn

  1. E.W. Kemble, Illustration for The Thompson Street Poker Club (1884)
  2. From E.W. Kemble, “Illustrating Huckleberry Finn,” The Colophon (February 1930)
  3. E.W. Kemble, Illustration of African Slavery, Century Magazine (February 1890)
  4. E.W. Kemble, New Illustrations for Huckleberry Finn (1899)

Appendix D: Selling Huckleberry Finn

  1. Sales Prospectus Blurb for Huckleberry Finn (1884)
  2. Sales Prospectus Poster for Huckleberry Finn (1884)
  3. Promotional Flyer for Huck Finn (1885)
  4. “Twins of Genius” Lecture Program Minneapolis-St. Paul (24 January 1885)
  5. Advertisement from Webster & Co. Catalogue Advertising Editions of Huck Finn (1892)

Appendix E: Reception of Huckleberry Finn

  1. Reviews
    1. Athenaeum (27 December 1884)
    2. Brander Matthews, Saturday Review (31 January 1885)
    3. Hartford Courant (20 February 1885)
    4. Life (26 February 1885)
    5. Boston Evening Traveler (5 March 1885)
    6. Daily Evening Bulletin (14 March 1885)
    7. San Francisco Chronicle (15 March 1885)
    8. T.S. Perry, The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine (May 1885)
    9. The Atlanta Constitution (26 May 1885)
  2. Coverage of Concord Library’s Banning of Huckleberry Finn
    1. New York Herald (18 March 1885)
    2. Literary World (21 March 1885)
    3. San Francisco Chronicle (29 March 1885)
    4. The Critic (30 May 1885)
    5. Hartford Courant, with Mark Twain’s response (4 April 1885)
  3. Reviews of Twain’s Performance of the Novel Onstage
    1. The Washington Post (25 November 1884)
    2. The Globe (9 December 1884)
    3. The Pittsburgh Dispatch (30 December 1884)
    4. The Cincinnati Enquirer (4 January 1885)
    5. The Minneapolis Daily Tribune (25 January 1885)
    6. Wisconsin State Journal (28 January 1885)
    7. Chicago Daily Tribune (3 February 1885)

Appendix F: Freedom versus Fate

  1. From The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876)
  2. From Life on the Mississippi (1883)
  3. From A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court (1889)
  4. From “Corn-Pone Opinions” (1901)
  5. From Twain’s Seventieth Birthday Dinner Speech (1905)
  6. From “The Turning Point of My Life,” Harper’s Bazaar (February 1911)

Select Bibliography

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"Although he does an expert job with the entire cast, [narrator William] Dufris's delivery of Jim's dialogue is his crowning achievement. . . . Jim's mind and heart come shining through." —-Publishers Weekly Audio Review

EBOOK COMMENTARY

All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. All American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.

Reading Group Guide

1. Critics have long disagreed about exactly what role Jim plays in Huckleberry Finn. Some have claimed, for example, that his purpose is solely to provide Huck with the opportunity for moral growth, while others have argued that he is a surrogate father figure to Huck. What do you think is Jim's role in the novel?

2. The ending of Huckleberry Finn has been the source of endless critical controveryse. Though no less than T.S. Eliot and Lionel Trilling defended the ending on the grounds that it is structurally coherent ("It is right," Eliot stated, "that the mood of the book should bring us back to the beginning"), many critics feel that the return of Tom Sawyer and his elaborate scheme for Jim's escape reduces what had been a serious quest for freedom to a silly farce. Bernard de Voto wrote, "In the whole reach of the English novel there is no more aburpt or more abrupt or chilling descent." How does the ending strike you?

3. The Mississippi can be considered a character in its own right in Huckleberry Finn. Discuss the role of the river in the novel.

4. How do humor and satire function in the book?

5. Critic William Manierre argued in a 1964-65 essay that "Huck's 'moral growth' has...been vastly overestimated," noting for example, that when his conscience begins to give him trouble, he decides he will "do whichever came handiest at the time," and that while Huck can be seen to achieve a kind of moral grandeur when he tears up the note he's written to Miss Watson, that achievement is underminded by his easy acceptance of Tom Sawyer's scheme in the last ten chapters. Do you agree or disagree?

6. In "The Greatness of Huckleberry Finn," Lionel Trilling stated that the style of the book is "not less than definitive in American literature," and Louis Budd has noted that "today it is standard academic wisdom that Twain's precedent-setting achievement is Huck's language." Discuss the effect of Twain's use of colloquial speech and dialect in the novel.




From the Trade Paperback edition.

Foreword

1. Critics have long disagreed about exactly what role Jim plays in Huckleberry Finn. Some have claimed, for example, that his purpose is solely to provide Huck with the opportunity for moral growth, while others have argued that he is a surrogate father figure to Huck. What do you think is Jim's role in the novel?

2. The ending of Huckleberry Finn has been the source of endless critical controveryse. Though no less than T.S. Eliot and Lionel Trilling defended the ending on the grounds that it is structurally coherent ("It is right," Eliot stated, "that the mood of the book should bring us back to the beginning"), many critics feel that the return of Tom Sawyer and his elaborate scheme for Jim's escape reduces what had been a serious quest for freedom to a silly farce. Bernard de Voto wrote, "In the whole reach of the English novel there is no more aburpt or more abrupt or chilling descent." How does the ending strike you?

3. The Mississippi can be considered a character in its own right in Huckleberry Finn. Discuss the role of the river in the novel.

4. How do humor and satire function in the book?

5. Critic William Manierre argued in a 1964-65 essay that "Huck's 'moral growth' has...been vastly overestimated," noting for example, that when his conscience begins to give him trouble, he decides he will "do whichever came handiest at the time," and that while Huck can be seen to achieve a kind of moral grandeur when he tears up the note he's written to Miss Watson, that achievement is underminded by his easy acceptance of Tom Sawyer's scheme in the last ten chapters. Do you agree ordisagree?

6. In "The Greatness of Huckleberry Finn," Lionel Trilling stated that the style of the book is "not less than definitive in American literature," and Louis Budd has noted that "today it is standard academic wisdom that Twain's precedent-setting achievement is Huck's language." Discuss the effect of Twain's use of colloquial speech and dialect in the novel.


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