The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

by Mark Twain

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Overview

Mark Twain’s masterpiece and the greatest of American novels.

Tom Sawyer’s best friend, Huckleberry Finn, takes center stage in this classic tale of boyhood adventure. Fleeing his drunken father and the civilizing influence of the Widow Douglas, Huck and the runaway slave Jim pilot a log raft down the mighty Mississippi River. The colorful characters and dramatic situations they encounter along the way—from bloodthirsty thieves lurking in an abandoned steamboat to a pair of aristocratic conmen dead set on robbing Arkansas blind—draw the two escapees closer together, until Huck is forced to make a fateful choice between Jim’s freedom and his own salvation.
 
One of the first major novels written in an American vernacular, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an essential part of the national identity. Its sophisticated treatment of serious themes such as the evils of slavery, the individual versus society, and the conflicting impulses of human nature, make it as vital and important today as when it was first published more than one hundred and thirty years ago.
 
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781480475182
Publisher: Open Road Media
Publication date: 12/22/2015
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 416
Sales rank: 54,278
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Mark Twain was the pen name of Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835–1910), who grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, and worked as a printer, riverboat pilot, newspaperman, and silver miner before his short story “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” brought him international attention. He would go on to write two of the great American novels, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and many other enduring works of fiction, satire, and travelogue. He is one of the most widely recognized figures in US history.
Mark Twain was the pen name of Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835–1910), who grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, and worked as a printer, riverboat pilot, newspaperman, and silver miner before his short story “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” brought him international attention. He would go on to write two of the great American novels, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and many other enduring works of fiction, satire, and travelogue. He is one of the most widely recognized figures in US history.

Date of Birth:

November 30, 1835

Date of Death:

April 21, 1910

Place of Birth:

Florida, Missouri

Place of Death:

Redding, Connecticut

Read an Excerpt

1

I Discover Moses and the Bulrushers


YOU DON'T KNOW about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt Polly - Tom's Aunt Polly, she is - and Mary, and the Widow Douglas is all told about in that book, which is mostly a true book, with some stretchers, as I said before.

Now the way that the book winds up is this: Tom and me found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich. We got six thousand dollars apiece all gold. It was an awful sight of money when it was piled up. Well, Judge Thatcher he took it and put it out at interest, and it fetched us a dollar a day apiece all the year round - more than a body could tell what to do with. The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time, considering how dismal regular and decent the widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn't stand it no longer I lit out. I got into my old rags and my sugar-hogshead again, and was free and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer he hunted me up and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and I might join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable. So I went back.

The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost lamb, and she called me a lot of other names, too, but she never meant no harm by it. She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn't do nothing but sweat and sweat, and felt all cramped up. Well, then, the old thing commenced again. The widow rung a bell for supper, and you had to come to time. When you got to the table you couldn't go right to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though there warn't really anything the matter with them - that is, nothing only everything was cooked by itself. In a barrel of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up, and the juice kind of swaps around, and the things go better.

After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses and the Bulrushers, and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but by and by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable long time; so then I didn't care no more about him, because I don't take no stock in dead people.

Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. But she wouldn't. She said it was a mean practice and wasn't clean, and I must try to not do it any more. That is just the way with some people. They get down on a thing when they don't know nothing about it. Here she was a-bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault with me for doing a thing that had some good in it. And she took snuff, too; of course that was all right, because she done it herself.

Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with goggles on, had just come to live with her, and took a set at me now with a spelling book. She worked me middling hard for about an hour, and then the widow made her ease up. I couldn't stood it much longer. Then for an hour it was deadly dull, and I was fidgety. Miss Watson would say, "Don't put your feet up there, Huckleberry"; and "Don't scrunch up like that, Huckleberry - set up straight"; and pretty soon she would say, "Don't gap and stretch like that, Huckleberry - why don't you try to behave?" Then she told me all about the bad place, and I said I wished I was there. She got mad then, but I didn't mean no harm. All I wanted was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a change, I warn't particular. She said it was wicked to say what I said; said she wouldn't say it for the whole world; she was going to live so as to go to the good place. Well, I couldn't see no advantage in going where she was going, so I made up my mind I wouldn't try for it. But I never said so, because it would only make trouble, and wouldn't do no good.

Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all about the good place. She said all a body would have to do there was to go around all day long with a harp and sing, forever and ever. So I didn't think much of it. But I never said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go there, and she said not by a considerable sight. I was glad about that, because I wanted him and me to be together.

Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome and lonesome. By and by they fetched the niggers in and had prayers, and then everybody was off to bed. I went up to my room with a piece of candle, and put it on the table. Then I set down in a chair by the window and tried to think of something cheerful, but it warn't no use. I felt so lonesome I most wished I was dead. The stars were shining, and the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I heard an owl, away off, who-whooing about somebody that was dead, and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something to me, and I couldn't make out what it was, and so it made the cold shivers run over me. Then away out in the woods I heard that kind of a sound that a ghost makes when it wants to tell about something that's on its mind and can't make itself understood, and so can't rest easy in its grave, and has to go about that way every night grieving. I got so downhearted and scared I did wish I had some company. Pretty soon a spider went crawling up my shoulder, and I flipped it off and it lit in the candle; and before I could budge it was all shriveled up. I didn't need anybody to tell me that that was an awful bad sign and would fetch me some bad luck, so I was scared and most shook the clothes off of me. I got up and turned around in my tracks three times and crossed my breast every time; and then I tied up a little lock of my hair with a thread to keep witches away. But I hadn't no confidence. You do that when you've lost a horseshoe that you've found, instead of nailing it up over the door, but I hadn't ever heard anybody say it was any way to keep off bad luck when you'd killed a spider.

I set down again, a-shaking all over, and got out my pipe for a smoke; for the house was all as still as death now, and so the widow wouldn't know. Well, after a long time I heard the clock away off in the town go boom - boom - boom - twelve licks; and all still again - stiller than ever. Pretty soon I heard a twig snap down in the dark amongst the trees - something was a-stirring. I set still and listened. Directly I could just barely hear a "me-yow! me-yow!" down there. That was good! Says I, "me-yow! me-yow!" as soft as I could, and then I put out the light and scrambled out of the window on to the shed. Then I slipped down to the ground and crawled in among the trees, and, sure enough, there was Tom Sawyer waiting for me.

Table of Contents

Referring to Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, H. L. Mencken noted that his discovery of this classic American novel was "the most stupendous event of my whole life"; Ernest Hemingway declared that "all modern American literature stems from this one book," while T. S. Eliot called Huck "one of the permanent symbolic figures of fiction, not unworthy to take a place with Ulysses, Faust, Don Quixote, Don Juan, Hamlet."
The novel's preeminence derives from its wonderfully imaginative re-creation of boyhood adventures along the mighty Mississippi River, its inspired characterization, the author's remarkable ear for dialogue, and the book's understated development of serious underlying themes: "natural" man versus "civilized" society, the evils of slavery, the innate value and dignity of human beings, the stultifying effects of convention, and other topics. But most of all, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a wonderful story―filled with high adventure and unforgettable characters (including the great river itself)―that no one who has read it will ever forget.
Unabridged Dover (1994) republication of the text of the first American edition, published by Charles L. Webster and Company, New York, 1885. New introductory Note.

What People are Saying About This

Ernest Hemingway

All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. All American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.

From the Publisher

"Although he does an expert job with the entire cast, [narrator William] Dufris's delivery of Jim's dialogue is his crowning achievement. . . . Jim's mind and heart come shining through." —-Publishers Weekly Audio Review

EBOOK COMMENTARY

All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. All American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.

T. S. Eliot

...We come to see Huck... as one of the permanent symbolic figures of fiction; not unworthy to tak e a place with Ulysses, Faust, Don Quixote, Don Juan, Hamlet, and other great discoveries that man has made about himself.

Lionel Trilling

One can read it at ten and then annually ever after, and each year find that it is as fresh as the year before...

Reading Group Guide

1. Critics have long disagreed about exactly what role Jim plays in Huckleberry Finn. Some have claimed, for example, that his purpose is solely to provide Huck with the opportunity for moral growth, while others have argued that he is a surrogate father figure to Huck. What do you think is Jim's role in the novel?

2. The ending of Huckleberry Finn has been the source of endless critical controveryse. Though no less than T. S. Eliot and Lionel Trilling defended the ending on the grounds that it is structurally coherent ("It is right, " Eliot stated, "that the mood of the book should bring us back to the beginning"), many critics feel that the return of Tom Sawyer and his elaborate scheme for Jim's escape reduces what had been a serious quest for freedom to a silly farce. Bernard de Voto wrote, "In the whole reach of the English novel there is no more aburpt or more abrupt or chilling descent." How does the ending strike you?

3. The Mississippi can be considered a character in its own right in Huckleberry Finn. Discuss the role of the river in the novel.

4. How do humor and satire function in the book?

5. Critic William Manierre argued in a 1964-65 essay that "Huck's 'moral growth' has... been vastly overestimated, " noting for example, that when his conscience begins to give him trouble, he decides he will "do whichever came handiest at the time, " and that while Huck can be seen to achieve a kind of moral grandeur when he tears up the note he's written to Miss Watson, that achievement is underminded by his easy acceptance of Tom Sawyer's scheme in the last ten chapters. Do you agree ordisagree?

6. In "The Greatness of Huckleberry Finn, " Lionel Trilling stated that the style of the book is "not less than definitive in American literature, " and Louis Budd has noted that "today it is standard academic wisdom that Twain's precedent-setting achievement is Huck's language." Discuss the effect of Twain's use of colloquial speech and dialect in the novel.

Foreword

1. Critics have long disagreed about exactly what role Jim plays in Huckleberry Finn. Some have claimed, for example, that his purpose is solely to provide Huck with the opportunity for moral growth, while others have argued that he is a surrogate father figure to Huck. What do you think is Jim's role in the novel?

2. The ending of Huckleberry Finn has been the source of endless critical controveryse. Though no less than T.S. Eliot and Lionel Trilling defended the ending on the grounds that it is structurally coherent ("It is right," Eliot stated, "that the mood of the book should bring us back to the beginning"), many critics feel that the return of Tom Sawyer and his elaborate scheme for Jim's escape reduces what had been a serious quest for freedom to a silly farce. Bernard de Voto wrote, "In the whole reach of the English novel there is no more aburpt or more abrupt or chilling descent." How does the ending strike you?

3. The Mississippi can be considered a character in its own right in Huckleberry Finn. Discuss the role of the river in the novel.

4. How do humor and satire function in the book?

5. Critic William Manierre argued in a 1964-65 essay that "Huck's 'moral growth' has...been vastly overestimated," noting for example, that when his conscience begins to give him trouble, he decides he will "do whichever came handiest at the time," and that while Huck can be seen to achieve a kind of moral grandeur when he tears up the note he's written to Miss Watson, that achievement is underminded by his easy acceptance of Tom Sawyer's scheme in the last ten chapters. Do you agree ordisagree?

6. In "The Greatness of Huckleberry Finn," Lionel Trilling stated that the style of the book is "not less than definitive in American literature," and Louis Budd has noted that "today it is standard academic wisdom that Twain's precedent-setting achievement is Huck's language." Discuss the effect of Twain's use of colloquial speech and dialect in the novel.

Customer Reviews

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 547 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This classic of American literature is perhaps the most misunderstood and maligned book since the Bible. Nobody who has ever actually read the book could ever call it racist. True, it is filled with the 'N' word that decent people find offensive, but it was necessary in the context. This wonderful book is just as powerfully anti-slavery as 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' by Harriett Beecher Stowe, but while her book is still praised, Mark Twain's book is being banned from high school libraries. I first read this book at age 12, and have re-read it at least every two years ever since. I'm in my 40's now, but Huck and Jim take me right back to 12 every time I see them again.
3GildeRJ More than 1 year ago
"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," by Mark Twain, is a book about Huckleberry Finn, the namesake of the book. Continuing the events of the last book "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer," Huck is living with widow Douglas, who has adopted him. Huck gets bored of the widow trying to civilize him, he runs out and his abusive father finds him. His father takes him in, and Huck tries to get out. He finds an old saw and cuts his way out of the house and fakes his own death. He catches a canoe and hides out on Jackson's island, Huck finds the widow's slave, Jim, who is also hiding out. Tom and Jim build a raft, and escape down the river.


During their trip, Huck and Jim meet a few colorful characters, including two feuding families, and two cons who claim to be a king and a duke. Huck may not seem so, but he is very clever, and able to see through the king and dukes' antics, which makes him sick to his stomach. Huck is always trying to do good, and sometimes has a conflict with himself in deciding exactly what is good. One night, he even thinks about turning Jim in, because he feels bad for helping the widow's slave escape. He tells two white men in a canoe to check the raft, claiming his sick uncle to be on it. He ends up convincing them that his uncle has smallpox, so they give him 40 dollars and leave him alone.


I think that this book is great. One of the best I've ever read. This book's plot may be a little over-used, a boy helping a slave escape from his master, but you never really know what's going to happen. Mark Twain is one of the best authors from whom I've ever read. This book easily makes me want to read some other books of his. There are twists, turns, and, like a punch to the face in a dark room, you never see them coming. If your okay with a few politically incorrect words (The book was written in the 1800s, when slavery was legal) and you love adventure, I definitley recommend this book to you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Even though I'm sure a lot of people hear this is a classic and think it's just some old book, I have to say I love The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The characters are incredible. The dialogue is often hilarious and tragic. It's just an all-around incredible novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like this book very much. It does get a little boring in the middle, but the ending is my favorite! It's worth reading.
Keri Kelly More than 1 year ago
BORING. With occasional excitment. Hard to understand at times because of the old english language the characters use, but overall well written. I just wish it could have been a little more of a page turner. I prefer Tom Sawyer over Huck Finn.
Raccoon More than 1 year ago
The audiobook assisted with the understanding of the dialects of the characters, similar to a play but with the images in your mind.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This classic story is a marvelous example of Mark Twain's writing skills and of his prominence as a writer. This story is hilarious and heartwarming, and is sure to enchant anyone who reads it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved reading this book from front to back it is on of the greaatest books ive ever read ndd ull love it too
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book is awesome but the free version has too many flaws and is not enjoyable to read. Pay the 99 cents and get to reading the actual literature. Google did a poor job on transcription!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Twain initially conceived of the work as a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer that would follow Huck Finn through adulthood. Beginning with a few pages he had removed from the earlier novel, Twain began work on a manuscript he originally titled Huckleberry Finn's Autobiography. Twain worked on the manuscript off and on for the next several years, ultimately abandoning his original plan of following Huck's development into adulthood. He appeared to have lost interest in the manuscript while it was in progress, and set it aside for several years. After making a trip down the Mississippi, Twain returned to his work on the novel. Upon completion, the novel's title closely paralleled its predecessor's: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade). Unlike The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn does not have the definite article "the" as a part of its proper title. Essayist and critic Spencer Neve states that this absence represents the "never fulfilled anticipations" of Huck's adventures-while Tom's adventures were completed (at least at the time) by the end of his novel, Huck's narrative ends with his stated intention to head West
apin More than 1 year ago
Why can't the flaw be fixed? Why couldn't this be properly transcribed? How about other public domain books. Almost makes me want to return my Nook Tablet.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Huckleberry Finn is a WONDERFUL book!! It is very FUNNY!!! It sould be rated 5 out of 5 stars!!! I had the adapted version read to me .The comprehensive edition I read to myself.The story is about freedom and friendship. Mark Twain did an outstanding job of talking the way people did back then. Anyone will enjoy it. FIVE STARS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
When looking at the world through a child's eyes, the simple things we take for granted emerge so clearly. Through out the hard times and the good, a child always carries that ever-burning flame of hope. This flame represents the very meaning of the human spirit. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, this flame burns bright in one young man. As Mark Twain so brilliantly narrates the story through the thirteen-year-old Huck's eyes, the reader quickly gets swept into the story. Feeling every twist and turn of Huck's life and watching that flame glow bright and sometimes very dim. It's amazing to see how Huck's life flows through the pages of the book. Even when he is faced with bitter family feuds, corrupt and dangerous con men or even slave hunters, he pulls through and bounces back just like a river does. Huck's life is the perfect example of how the human spirit always pushes through to see another precious day. Mark Twain was truly 'forced' as he would say to become a novelist by writing this book because he goes so deep into the mind of Huck that often the reader can not tell weather Twain or Huck is speaking. Mark Twain is also forced by this book to take the reader deeper and keep them hooked with magnificent descriptions of great summer storms and beautiful sunrises over the Mississippi or with the unusual small town characters that in someway we can all identify with. He also makes us think about what it means to truly be free. Twain always captures the mind, encourages the spirit, and touches the heart each time he writes, which is probably what moved Ernest Hemingway to say that 'modern American literature began with Huckleberry Finn.'
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is great so far
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love the story but when they talk it is kinda hard to umderstand because they talk with a southern acent. If you can get past that it is a good book for 10-12 yo.
Cougar_H More than 1 year ago
Although Huck Finn is a classic book and loved by many, I found it hard to read. It was written in many different Southern dialects, and it had sentences like, "How you gwyne git'm? You can't slip up on um en grab um; en how's a body gwyne to hit um wid a rock?" Reading conversation after conversation like this gets old fast. Overall, it was a great story, and the major theme of "looking for freedom" was pretty cool. If it was easier to read, I would have LOVED this book, and I would recommend it to anyone who can stomach weird dialects and old fashioned writing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I can't type much, seein' as how I've got to be off finishing my report on Twain, but would like to say just a few things first. One! this is an excellent book and is written in an excellent style. Twain uses the language of the time, and that really gives life to the story. As a story itself it is extreemly exciting and is worth your time! Two! the people who said this book is boring really do need to get their head examined. This is not just a story about some kids trying to be bandits in a club, or some kid and his nigger floating down the mississippi on a raft. This book was written by Twain to deal with the moral and racial issues of the time. Much of which (especially in the moral bit) still applies today, which makes it one of the most highly regarded American Novels of all time. I could ramble on about much more but really I must finish my bit on Huck Finn and then start on my bit for Connecticut Yankee
Guest More than 1 year ago
As you can see its title, the story is about adventures.But I think it is beyond adventures. After I read the second chapter, I couldn't understand the people who joined 'Tom Sawyer's Gang. The rule of the band doesn't make sense to me.The rule is saying that everyone wants to join the band has to write his name in blood and kill the families of the boys who told the secrets of them. I think Huckleberry Finn and I are really different people in characteristics.I don't like adventures but there would be no Huckleberry Finn without adventures. I don't like the character but it was good experience that made me to think about the people that are totally different from me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Overall, I found this book to be great. Twain's characters were lively and energetic. His use of the southern dialect in Huck's narrative and in the dialog between characters added a certain depth to the novel. It made the characters seem more realistic because the story was set in Missouri along the Mississippi River, and for them to have been speaking proper English would have been hard to swallow. Twain's characters were interestingly crafted as well. Huck and Jim were both amusingly superstitious, the King and the Duke were brilliant and stupid at the same time, and the contrast between the Widow Douglas and her sister on their views on Christianity was very striking indeed. The only negative thing that I found in the book was the use of derogatory names for the slaves. Of course, these names are expected to appear in the novel due to its setting in time. Other than that, the book was great. It was full of adventure, cultural color, and vivid imagery. I'd recommend it to anyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book was a very southern style book.I have to say Iactually did like the book pretty good.It was a very adventourous book with Huck and Jim headed north up the Mississippi River. The story gave a pretty great picture of the way the south is and that might be my favorite part about the book. It also reminded me of the kinds of books my elementary school teachers would read to my class.It is aanother good adventure book that needs to read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this was an ok book. I wished it had more action in it. Huck Finn to me is a little boy that is interested in what the world has to offer and he finds out when he goes through the adventures he encounters. I would recommed this book because it makes you think alot about salvery and what it must've been like for Jim and put yourself in Jim shoes, its just something to think about.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was mesmerized for about 7 hours. This was the best read audio book I have ever heard.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mark Twain has created a world of adventure and curiosity. For Huckleberry Finn his new life of wealth and civilization is more than he can stand. All he can do is wait for an adventure that will free him of his boredom. When his Pap comes back to town, Huck must go and live with him. Pap is an abusive alcoholic. Huckleberry can't wait to get away. After feigning his own death, Huck takes off down the Mississippi in a canoe. He runs across Jim, Miss Watson's runaway slave. Together they sail down the river on a raft, encountering many different people. The scheming Duke and King, the violent Grangerfords who are feuding with the Sheperdsons, and even Tom Sawyer's Aunt Sally gets pulled into Huck's journey. Huck's good luck and sharp wit saves the two friends from peril on more than one occasion. Mark Twain has done a wonderful job of showing life on the Mississippi River. The language used is what one would expect to hear people from 19th century Missouri using. Twain's atmosphere absorbs the reader into Huck's world of mischief and mayhem.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Very good book - quick reading as the scenery, adventures and characters change often. Moral issues also presented. A boy who is not afraid to overcome the poor circumstances that he is born into.
Guest More than 1 year ago
¿THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN¿ The book of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn takes place in the Mississippi River. Huck is a boy that likes to be traveling around the world; he doesn¿t like to stay in one single place. He started to get out of the town because he had a father (Pap). He threated him so badly that he was living with two ladies the Widow Douglas and Miss Watson. They tryed to civilized him, but he didn't like that way of living that he ran away from them that was when he started his adventures. We witness the critique, presentation, themes, realistic, entertaining of Huckleberry Finn book. This all started when Huck ran away from his house, and he found a slave named Jim he was Miss Watson¿s slave. He didn¿t like to be a slave, so he ran away too. He was going to look for his family. They got into many adventures together. With these I learned that there are people who don¿t like slavery in the year that this story happened. The true thing about slavery and friendship is that when you don¿t have a true friend, but when we find one, we try to be trustful with it. It showed a good way to know about the adventures of one or more persons. It showed also good numbers of settings. Well all of these things look and tell what we can live today in these days when you run away from home to get some joy in the world with adventures. This book was really good because it had good setting . They show us the importance of friendship. In this movie, we saw child abuse and alcoholics and other things. When the main character showed what was his ideas, it got my whole attention because he was so smart to do all of those things to help Jim, his true friend. This book didn¿t affect my thinkings because it helped me to appreciate all of my friends for what they are and what they have inside, not what they can do for me or what is my convenience with them. It tells me many things about friendship of how important it is for all of us, and when to know if a person is your friend or not.