The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism, Where All of Life is a Paid-for Experience

The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism, Where All of Life is a Paid-for Experience

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781585420827
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 03/28/2001
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 1,082,869
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

One of the most popular social thinkers of our time, Jeremy Rifkin is the bestselling author of The European Dream, The Hydrogen Economy, The Age of Access, The Biotech Century, and The End of Work. A fellow at the Wharton School's Executive Education Program, he is president of The Foundation on Economic Trends in Bethesda, MD.

Table of Contents

Part I: The Next Capitalist Frontier
Chapter One: Entering the Age of Access
Chapter Two: When Markets Give Way to Networks
Chapter Three: The Weightless Economy
Chapter Four: Monopolizing Ideas
Chapter Five: Everything Is a Service
Chapter Six: Commodifying Human Relationships
Chapter Seven: Access as a Way of Life

Part II: Enclosing the Cultural Commons
Chapter Eight: The New Culture of Capitalism
Chapter Nine: Mining the Cultural Landscape
Chapter Ten: A Postmodern Stage
Chapter Eleven: The Connected and the Disconnected
Chapter Twelve: Toward an Ecology of Culture and Capitalism

Notes
Bibliography
Index

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The Age of Access: The New Culture of Hypercapitalism, Where All of Life is a Paid-for Experience 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
dboyce70 on LibraryThing 23 days ago
Rifkin gives an insightful analysis of the shift from property ownership to the information economy and how access to information becomes evermore critical. The value of his thoughts for me have to do with his insights about how the the market, which in past societies was a off to the side, but has now become more and more the driving force shaping human culture and interaction. Access to the "market place" is now controlled by marketing interests and not by more traditional forces of religion, philosophy, politics.