The Amish Cookie Club

The Amish Cookie Club

by Sarah Price

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Overview

Every other Friday, Edna Esh and three of her childhood friends meet to bake sugar cookies for their respective church districts on worship Sunday. It’s a time to give to the Plain community—and give support to each other as they share their joys and fears . . .
 
Edna’s friend, Verna Bontrager, has a problem. Her outspoken twenty-year-old daughter, Myrna, has been fired from her job. Again. Myrna’s family really needs her to chip in, but she’s clearly unsuited to customer service—not to mention that her sharp tongue scares away any boy who might come courting. But Edna has an idea—and his name is Ezekiel Riehl.
 
A widower with four young children, Ezekiel needs help. His house and his brood are a mess; his demeanor is gruff. It’s no surprise Myrna takes an immediate dislike to him. Yet she has no choice but to take on the challenge—and soon she starts to create order out of chaos. In fact, the kids begin to depend on Myrna—and so does Ezekiel. The truth is, she’s fallen in love with him. But if he’s to prove he’s not looking for a marriage of convenience, he’ll have to convince her of what’s in his heart . . .
 
Includes Cookie recipes!

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781420149173
Publisher: Kensington
Publication date: 05/28/2019
Series: The Amish Cookie Club Series , #1
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 116,490
Product dimensions: 4.10(w) x 6.70(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

Sarah Price comes from a long line of devout Mennonites, including numerous church leaders and ministers throughout the years. Her involvement with the Amish dates back to 1978 when she wrote her first novel, Fields of Corn, while studying anthropology and writing at Drew University. She was drawn to the amazing culture of the Amish of Lancaster County where Ms. Price is involved with numerous Amish communities and is considered family by some and friend by most others. First Impressions, A Retelling of Pride & Prejudice, Sarah's salute to Jane Austen from an Amish perspective, debuted on the ECPA bestseller list. Ms. Price has advanced degrees in Communication (MA), Marketing (MBA), and Educational Leadership (PhD) and was a former college professor. She now writes full-time and talks about her books and her faith on a daily live stream with readers. Learn more about Sarah and her novels at SarahPriceAuthor.com.

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

The smell of freshly baked cinnamon rolls always reminded Edna Esh of her mother.

Lifting the pan toward her face, Edna shut her eyes and inhaled deeply, enjoying the warm steam that brushed against her cheeks as she savored the scent of freshly ground cinnamon.

In the silence of the moment, she thought back to the days of her youth. Saturdays. Those were the mornings her mother baked cinnamon rolls at her father's farm outside of Seyberts, Indiana. Farm life was always busy, but, even though all the children were home for the day, Saturday mornings were less chaotic for her mother. No school lunches to prepare, no faces to wash, no children to hurry off to school. With her brood filling the house with laughter, Edna's mother was always in her glory. Back then, her gift to her children was those gloriously wonderful cinnamon rolls which began every weekend like a tasty note of love.

"I'll never understand you." The teasing voice of her husband interrupted the moment. "Baking sweets before your friends visit so you can bake more sweets!"

Opening her eyes, Edna smiled at Elmer. For almost thirty years, he'd been her husband, partner, and — most importantly — her best friend. She watched as he stood in the doorway, kicking off his work boots — one, two ... each landing with a loud clomp on the mudroom floor — before entering the kitchen. He didn't seem to notice the clumps of dirt which fell from the soles. Sighing, Edna made a mental note to sweep the floor before her friends arrived.

He had already removed his hat, which had left his salt-and-pepper hair pressed flat against his head. "Seems you have those gals over more for visiting than for baking!" he teased.

"Oh now, Elmer!" Despite the truth to his statement, Edna protested. "You know I like to welcome the girls with something special to nibble on during their visit."

Elmer shuffled his stockinged feet across the floor and peered into the pan, careful to keep his long beard from touching the baked goods. Like his wife, he, too, breathed in the aroma. "Mmm!" Teasingly, he reached a finger toward the pan. "How about I sample one?"

But Edna was quicker than he was. After twenty-nine years of marriage, she'd anticipated his attempt to taste the frosting on one of the rolls. She swooped in and shifted the pan from his grasp. "I do believe we were both standing in the same room when the doctor told you no sweets, Elmer Esh!" she said as she set it onto a rack near the stove to cool.

"Oh, pssh!" He waved his hand dismissively at her. "What do doctors know about anything anyway?"

Edna laughed, her dark, almond-shaped eyes crinkling into half-moons. She couldn't help but look at her husband with tenderness. How hard it must be for him to give up sweets! But the doctor's orders were quite clear: avoid sugar. Perhaps even worse than giving up desserts and treats was that Elmer had been forced to give up sugar in his coffee. While Edna didn't mind drinking her coffee black, Elmer fussed about that almost as much as he fussed about giving up cookies and pies.

"Well, I sure do think Dr. Graham knows a spell more than you do about your heart!"

Elmer scowled. "Bah!"

"Now don't you 'bah' me," she scolded playfully.

He turned to the sink and began to wash his hands. "So what're you girls making today anyway?"

She was surprised that he asked that question. Whenever her friends Mary Ropp, Wilma Schwartz, and Verna Bontrager came over, they always baked the same thing. "Why, cookies, of course!"

Twice a month, the four women gathered to bake different types of cookies for the fellowship meal that followed the Sunday worship service. They had started the tradition when Wilma's twins, Rachel and Ella Mae, turned sixteen and began their rumschpringe. Wilma had taken quite a turn, falling into a blue mood without her youngest daughters spending their free time at home. An empty house began evolving into an empty heart.

The truth was that none of them had little ones at home anymore. The realization that this phase of motherhood had ended and a new one had begun distressed all of them, but none more so than Wilma.

It was Edna who came up with the idea to meet on the Fridays before church Sundays. She'd sat down, written each of her three best friends a letter and detailed her idea for gathering twice a month to bake cookies. After all, she had written, they needed each other for support, and what better way to provide that than meeting on a regular basis? Besides, who didn't love cookies?

And there was no better way to give each other support than to bake together. They would fill cookie sheet after cookie sheet with freshly made dough — usually sugar or oatmeal cookies but sometimes they'd choose another equally delicious recipe — and bundle them up in storage containers to bring to their respective worship services.

All three of the women readily agreed with Edna's plan. After all, it was a great reason not only to spend time together, but to support each other as well.

Elmer and Edna lived on an old farm that was farther from town, while the other three women lived closer to Shipshewana. Only Verna and Mary lived in the same church district, so the four of them rarely saw one another except for these two precious Fridays each month.

"No sense in trying to talk you into making those oatmeal cookies, I reckon?"

Edna laughed at her husband. "Nee, Elmer. You know that the little ones always ask for sugar cookies. It's expected, I suppose."

"Woe to the kinner who prefer oatmeal cookies to sugar cookies!" Elmer groaned. "Well then, I best be making myself scarce then. Wouldn't want to get in the way of you womenfolk." He dried his hands on a dish towel, then draped it over the sink. "You need anything from town?"

"Ja, I do!" Edna scurried over to the breakfront and opened a drawer. "Annie's supposed to be finished with that quilt back she's piecing for me."

Elmer raised an eyebrow. "Another quilt? Land's sake, Edna. You have the energy of ten men."

She ignored the compliment. "I'm making this one for Jacob and Mary's baby. Might you stop by Jennifer's shop and see if Annie dropped it off? If so, give Jennifer this envelope and bring home the package." She didn't wait for his response as she handed him a plain white envelope. "And don't lose that! It's cash."

Elmer frowned. "One time, Edna. Just one time. Will you ever let me live that down?"

She smiled and leaned over, placing a soft kiss on his cheek. "Never."

"That's what I thought." He slid the envelope into his back pocket and then patted it as if to reassure his wife that it was secure. "Safe and sound."

Edna watched as he crossed the room and disappeared into the bedroom. She suspected he was going to change his shirt, which was dirty from tending to the livestock that morning.

She worried about him. He was looking older and more tired as of late. Edna knew that he worked far too hard for far too little. It was increasingly difficult to make ends meet on the farm. Why, her cousin Norma's husband had recently given up his dairy herd because there just wasn't any money in it anymore. But Elmer insisted on continuing to raise cows, just like his father and grandfather and great-grandfather before him.

To make ends meet, Edna cooked for Englische tourists during the busy seasons — usually from May until October. Over the winter, she took a break and focused on making quilts. After all, when the weather changed, the tourists weren't as plentiful as during the warmer months.

Still, the lack of that extra income in the wintertime meant Elmer had to work even harder. Despite enjoying her winter reprieve, Edna was glad that springtime had returned and, beginning in mid-May, she'd start hosting Englische meals again in her farmhouse on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays.

Living on a farm was always a struggle.

While Edna knew that they would be all right, she wasn't quite so certain that their eldest son, John, would fare the same.

With three sons, and no daughters, the farm was destined to pass down to a fifth generation of Esh boys. However, only John expressed any interest in farming, even though he worked part-time at the auction house in Shipshewana. The two younger boys, Jonas and Jeremiah, weren't settled into careers yet, although Jonas appeared to favor construction. They much preferred hanging out with their friends and traveling to different places — camping or hunting being their favorite things to do. Neither of them had yet to take his kneeling vow, either.

It was a great cause of concern for both Edna and Elmer.

The bedroom door opened, and Elmer stepped out. He wore a clean light blue shirt, and his hair was freshly combed.

"Still got my envelope?" she asked, half joking.

Elmer patted his back pocket for a second time. "Sure do."

"Send my best to Jennifer, and if you see John in town, remind him that he's to stop at Yoders' for some cheese. I need it for Sunday. I promised to make my cup cheese for the fellowship meal."

"Quilt. Cheese. Got it." He slipped on his boots, not bothering to tie them, and grabbed his hat. "Reckon I'll be home about four, so you've plenty of time to enjoy your visit with the girls."

She gave him a warm smile. Some husbands might grumble about having women take over the kitchen twice a month to meet with friends, but not Elmer. He'd always been kind and considerate like that. Perhaps it was because he grew up with five sisters. It was the only regret that Edna ever had: not having a daughter. But God had chosen for her to be a mother of sons, and she wasn't about to question His plan.

A few minutes later, she heard the horse and buggy as it rolled down the gravel driveway toward the main road. With the house empty again and the cinnamon rolls cooling, Edna took a quick look around to make certain everything was just so. It wouldn't do to have even one thing out of place. The last thing she wanted was for anyone to think her house was unkempt.

* * *

It was just after twelve thirty when the black buggy rolled into the driveway. Hearing the wheels rumbling on the gravel, Edna felt that familiar surge of joy. She hurried to the window and peered outside, smiling when she saw the horse stop by the barn.

As usual, Verna had driven, stopping to pick up Mary first and then Wilma. And, as usual, the first woman to emerge from the buggy was Wilma. Her dark green dress still had flour marks on the sides, probably from baking fresh bread for her family that morning. Her white prayer kapp covered her graying hair, but a few strands had sprung free and poked out from the back of the stiff white head covering.

Quickly, Edna hurried through the kitchen door and onto the porch, eagerly waiting to greet her friends.

"Wilkum! And hurry! The cinnamon rolls are still warm from this morning!"

Wilma didn't wait for Verna or Mary. She hurried up the walkway toward Edna. "Cinnamon buns? Why, I should've known better than to have a slice of pie after my noon meal!" With the other two ladies out of earshot, she leaned over and whispered, "Prepare yourself. It's going to be another one of those afternoons."

Edna's eyes widened and she immediately looked over Wilma's shoulders. "Verna?"

"Ja," was the whispered answer.

"Oh help."

"And this time it's a doozy."

Edna took a deep breath. If she had started the regular baking gatherings for support when Wilma was going through her blue spell, they had all maintained it for Verna's sanity.

There was no more time for whispered exchanges as both Verna and Mary headed up the walkway, too close for Edna and Wilma to risk further discussion of the matter.

It always struck Edna how similar Verna and Mary looked. Today was no exception. If ever there were two long-lost twins, Verna and Mary were surely they. Of course, Mary was a year younger than Verna and was a second cousin to her rather than a sister. But they shared a similar petite stature and dark brown hair that seemed to defy aging, for neither one had any gray hairs yet.

As she neared the porch, Mary pushed her glasses back onto the bridge of her nose. "Not a day too soon, let me tell you. I was counting the hours until Friday," she said, "starting on Tuesday!"

Edna glanced at Wilma, who merely shrugged.

Verna caught her breath, a little noise escaping her pursed lips. "Oh, Mary, I never even thought to ask how Bethany's doing. Why! I was so wrapped up in my Myrna's latest troubles that I neglected to inquire about yours!"

"Well, I reckon you've got your hands full with that fiery redheaded dochder of yours," Mary replied. "Can't say I blame you for fretting over her."

The downcast expression on Verna's face spoke of her disappointment in her daughter. "That's no excuse."

Edna knew that she needed to take swift control of the situation or they'd have Verna or Mary — or mayhaps even both! — in tears. Between Verna's constant need for approval and Mary's worrying, it wasn't unusual for someone to wind up crying.

"Kum now. Let's sit inside. I've a fresh pot of coffee brewing. We can discuss what's happened once we've a hot cup to dunk our cinnamon buns in!"

She guided them inside, catching Wilma's woeful gaze. Usually during their gatherings, the four women laughed and talked, sharing stories about their families. Occasionally there were a few tears over little disagreements or worries. As of late, it seemed that Verna was having the worst of it with her daughter, Myrna. But today, clearly Mary needed to vent as well.

Edna prayed she'd made enough cinnamon rolls to get them through both women's complaints.

* * *

By the time everyone had settled in and begun mixing the batches of sugar, flour, and other ingredients, both Mary and Verna had relaxed a bit. For this, Edna thanked the good Lord. She had been looking forward to a fun afternoon with her friends. Since it had started out with a litany of complaints, though, it was apt to be anything but.

"Your haus sure is quiet," Wilma said as she mixed the sugar cookie dough with her hands. "Can't remember the last time I had such a luxury."

Edna laughed. "Your twins still at it?"

"Oh, wouldn't you know it!" Wilma squished the dough between her fingers, then began forming a ball. "Rachel and Ella Mae just about wear me out with their constant bickering." She patted the dough ball and left it in the bowl to rest. "Can't wait for them to get married and move on out!"

"Oh now, Wilma!" Edna clicked her tongue. "You say that now, but we all know you'll be feeling the blues when that time comes."

"Hmph. Don't be so sure of that." Wilma wagged a plump finger in Edna's direction. "When your boys finally settle down — "

"Finally," Edna repeated good-naturedly.

"— you'll be wondering why you were in such a hurry for them to get married!"

Edna rolled her eyes. "What. Ever." But there was a teasing tone to her enunciated words.

"I'd take the bickering of your two girls over the deafening silence from my Bethany," Mary offered in a soft voice. "Why, I've never seen such a deathly shy girl in my life. Just the other day, I asked her to run into town to fetch me some cheese from Yoders' Store and she nigh 'bout fainted!"

Edna clucked her tongue again. It was such a shame that Bethany wasn't more outgoing. Not only was she a pretty girl, but she was also a hard worker. She'd make someone a right good wife, if only a man could break through the wall of silence that surrounded her. But she'd always been a quiet child, and her shyness hadn't changed now that she was nineteen.

"I don't know what to do with her," Mary continued, her voice full of concern. "It's just not natural to be so introverted."

"Be glad your dochder is not extroverted," Verna countered. "Like mine."

Immediately, the energy in the room shifted from Mary to Verna. Edna braced herself for what she knew was undoubtedly coming: another Myrna story.

"That girl," Verna began, shaking her head. "She's never going to change."

Taking a deep breath, Edna pinched a piece of the dough ball and began rolling it between her palms. "What did Myrna do this time?"

A scowl crossed Verna's face. "She went and got fired. Again." "Again?"

"Ja, that's right. Again!"

Edna shut her eyes. "Oh help."

Tossing her hands in the air, Verna's eyes widened. "She's been hired and fired from every shop in Shipshewana!"

Despite the seriousness of the conversation, Edna couldn't help but chuckle. "That's a bit of an exaggeration, don't you think?"

Verna began counting on her fingers. "The auction haus. Yoders' Store. The tea shop in the Red Barn. The theater. The quilt shop. And now the grocery store!" She made a face. "No one gets fired from the grocery store!"

(Continues…)


Excerpted from "The Amish Cookie Club"
by .
Copyright © 2019 Price Productions, LLC.
Excerpted by permission of KENSINGTON PUBLISHING CORP..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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The Amish Cookie Club 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Creative2xmom 5 months ago
Best friends Edna, Vera, Wilma and Mary meet together every other week to bake cookies for their Amish fellowships and to make time for each other. Their "cookie club" provides a place to reconnect and unburden. When Vera's daughter, Myrna, is fired from multiple jobs, the group conspires to help her find her place... and perhaps, even a beau. Widower Ezekiel desperately needs help with his four young children, and for awhile it appears as though a romance may be kindled between he and Myrna. But when a misunderstanding regarding his deseased wife occurs, Myrna finds herself on edge in their relationship. Will the truth be revealed in time for this two to connect and find happiness together? Sarah Price was a new to me author and I loved the way she was able to weave together several minor and major characters throughout the book. I was a little worried about Myrna in this one. Although I was pretty confident that things would turn out alright, the author had me guessing throughout most of the book. The Amish Cookie Club was a wonderful story about second chances, the stickiness of gossip, and finding ones self. Perfect for a light, uplifting read. *Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.
Mousiemom123 6 months ago
What a great book! The story was entertaining and sweet, but my favorite part of it was the ladies of the cookie club. They’re not the sainted Amish elders you find in most books of the genre. They’re real women with faults, foibles and egos just like the rest of us. You feel like they could be your neighbors. I think it’s a great start to a series, and I can’t wait to read the next installment. I received a free e-copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.
lelesurfer 7 months ago
For Cookie Lovers and others Best-selling author (e.g., ECPA Christian Fiction Bestseller, Amazon Top 100 Author) Sarah Price's book "The Amish Cookie Club" published by Kensington Books is the first one in a series with the same name. Edna Esh and her three friends, Verna, Wilma, and Mary, meet at least twice a month although they belong to different Amish church districts. The Friday meetings are used to bake cookies for the church meetings. The socializing and the discussion about the challenges of and with their children are included. They do not want to be called a club. Verna's daughter, Myrna Bontrager, cannot hold on to a job because she is too outspoken. Then she starts to work for the widower Ezekiel Riehl and his four children. How will he, who does not want to marry again, react to her? Will he be able to only admire her? Will the experiences of his past and the abounding rumors about him influence his life forever? This was the third book by Sarah Price which I read and again I was not disappointed. The book is full of emotions and challenges (e.g., the wagging tongues in the Amish community). It is good, wholesome, and clean and presents believable characters. There is wisdom to be learned from the women and a good novel to read for relaxation. Furthermore, it includes cookie recipes for the treats that Edna and her friends are creating. I highly recommend the novel and I am looking forward to read the other books in the series, the following being about Bethany, the daughter of another friend of Edna. The complimentary copy of this book was provided by the publisher through NetGalley free of charge. I was under no obligation to offer a positive review. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. #TheAmishCookieClub #NetGalley
AdventurousWife 8 months ago
Great Book !!! This book was a great start to a new series, I loved the reactions of the characters to the things that happened throughout the book. They were very believable, and they made me want to bake cookies :) . I thought Myrna was a good character and I loved the play between her and Zeke, I wish it would have been a longer story as I didn't want it to end :) The only thing that I didn't particularly like was all the bouncing around between the characters, however it was still a great story, and I would definitely recommend adding it to your TBR Pile. I can't wait to read the next book in the series !! I really love Sarah Price's Books :) I volunteered to read this book from Kingston Books in exchange for my honest feedback, the thoughts and opinions expressed within are my own.
KrisAnderson_TAR 8 months ago
The Amish Cookie Club is a cute Amish romance novel. I enjoyed the four main characters who gather together every other week at Edna Esh’s to bake cookies for their respective church districts to be enjoyed after the worship meal. Their children are grown up, but they are still causing problems for the women. Edna suggests that they come up with a plan for each child starting with Myrna Bontrager, Verna’s daughter. Myrna is outspoken with certain ideas and a whiz at organizing. Unfortunately, her employers have not appreciated her skills including her own father. When Edna hears that Ezekiel Riehl needs someone to take care of his home and kids, it seems like the perfect place for Myrna. And a mother can always hope that romance might blossom. I liked Myrna with her zest for organization and planning. She certainly has her hands full with four children to watch, a house to clean, laundry, gardening, canning, and cooking (wears me out just thinking about all the chores). Cookies are a recurrent theme throughout the book and the ladies soon find themselves making more cookies after being cornered by the bishop’s wife. There are recipes at the end too! My favorite lines from The Amish Cookie Club is “. . .we can’t change the past. Only try to do better tomorrow.” I enjoyed reading the engaging The Amish Cookie Club. It is a light-hearted story that will have you laughing and craving cookies.
Pattistep 9 months ago
This was such an enjoyable story. I absolutely loved all the characters in this book. The three Amish mothers who make up the “Amish Cookie Club” are charming. I especially loved the main character, Myrna. She is a lovable, caring, single young Amish lady who is very unreserved and plain-spoken in her dealings with others. She’s not self-centered or mean, she’s just supremely confident that she can look at any person or situation and offer needed improvements. Needless to say, Myrna finds herself in hot water more than she should, and she’s been fired from every job she’s tried. The mothers of the Amish Cookie Club decide that Myrna needs a complete change of pace. They’ve found Myrna a job for keeping house for Ezekiel, a widower with four children. Myrna feels confident that she can reorganize and restore how the household runs. Taking care of four children, however, complicates things more than she thought, and she finds herself unexpectedly drawn to Ezekiel. There’s quite a bit of fun in this story, as the Amish mothers try to direct the lives of their children, and also watching Myrna and Ezekiel learn how to deal with each other. I’m already looking forward to reading the rest of this series, as these mothers have more of their children’s lives to manage. I received a copy of this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.
tish-a 9 months ago
What a great book. it was heartwarming and made you laugh. A story of a group of friends who baked cookies for there Amish church. When one of there daughters kept losing her job because she loved to organize things they had a plan to find her a new job. Myrna got a job helping a widower with four children. it is a beautiful story of lose and love. Thanks NetGalley and also thanks to the publisher for giving me the chance to read and give my honest opinion.
tlgreear 9 months ago
The Amish Cookie Club by Sarah Price is one of the most honest books I have read about the Amish and I have read a lot! Price delivers real people with real problems and she doesn’t Christianity coat anything. I’m not saying The Amish Cookie Club isn’t a Christian story. But, even though the Amish believes and practices are part of the story, the characters are probably more realistically portrayed. Four Amish women bake cookies one a week for the church gatherings. But they don’t like being called a club! The story centers around Myrna, a daughter of Verna Bontrager. Verna has her hands full with her outspoken daughter and turns to her three friends for help. The ladies make more than cookies at their get together! They make plans to help Verna find Myrna a job. But of course the story throws in some surprises. Edna and her friends listen too closely to the local gossip who seems to have a lot of information concerning the man Myrna will be working for. Zeke has four motherless children and a house completely without order. Perfect for Myrna! Maybe...... my Amish education begins! I had no clue there were so many different Amish groups. Here is one reason I truly enjoy Sarah Price’s books. The Amish Cookie Club deals with gossip, family disfunction, job firings, extreme shyness but not all in this book. Yep. This is the first in a series. And I will be buying all of the. I voluntarily received a copy of this book from Netgalley.
DianaFlow 9 months ago
Every time I begin a book by masterful author, Sarah Price, I get shivers of delight down my spine and feel like a kid in a candy store—or in this case I suppose I should say a bakery. lol 'The Amish Cookie Club' is a fun read guaranteed to bring a smile or two, some laughing out loud, tearing up, and definitely cause a few sweet cravings along the way! The "club" includes long-time friends who not only bind together to bake for their church districts, but to lend support to one another as problems arise with their grown children. And as with each book by Ms. Price I glean some of life's lessons along the way—the harm of gossip and holding grudges, not jumping to conclusions, and the importance of talking things out instead of letting them fester...to name a few. A delightful read that will captivate readers of all ages, I highly recommend 'The Amish Cookie Club'! I received a complimentary copy of this novel from NetGalley and was not required to write a positive review. All opinions expressed are my own.
tiggeruoSO 9 months ago
This author did not disappoint with this fun read. I mean when you take four women and put them in a kitchen what else are they going to do but bake up some fun things. I really like Myrna she was sassy and you know we all want to speak what’s on our minds, we just don’t. I think we may all need a little Myrna in our selves. I really liked Ezekiel’s truly was a man of God just seeking help for his small family. I also liked how the author had away of being out the children’s personality in such a way that they too were super fun to read about as well as the four friends in the cookie club. I liked that this is a good clean read and suitable for all ages. I also like that the author had a gentle way of reminding the reader of how the words that come out of our mouths are just as powerful and hurtful to others, with this author there always seems to be a lesson to learn in her books. I can’t wait to read more from these friends and see what they cook up next. I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley. I was under no obligation to post a review and have given my honest opinion.
sgreene01 9 months ago
This book is a delightful look into the lives of four Amish ladies who meet to make cookies for their church services. Close friends, they share about their children and the particular needs in their lives. Verna’s daughter, Myrna, is very outspoken, which goes against the grain of many of the Amish, as well as the Englishers in the community. So much so, she has gotten fired of every job she has had in town and no one will hire her. The ladies decide something needs to be done and one of them learns of an Amish widower with 4 children who needs someone to help with the running of the household and care of the children. Myrna balks at this suggestion as she has never really cared for children and is not sure she is qualified. This is a lovely story of changes in lives, realization that you can’t believe everything you hear about someone, and true understanding and love. I enjoyed this book very much. It was a fast read and I highly recommend it. I received a copy from Kensington Books and Netgalley. This is my honest review.
MaijaKytta 9 months ago
When Myrna’s mother, and her mother’s friends, hatched a plan to help Myrna find a job that was suited for her, little did they know, it was just what the doctor ordered. I loved reading the love story of Myrna and Zeke. It was also fun to see characters from other books that Sarah has written mentioned at different points of the novel as well. It’s like a little sequel within a different series, and I love it, as we’ve grown to love the characters throughout all of her books. I can’t wait for An Amish Cookie Club Christmas to be released as well!
KelsieAL 9 months ago
The Amish Cookie Club Sarah Price The Amish Cookie Club by Sarah Price is book one in her series of the same name. I’m new to this author, but I love Amish fiction so I take advantage of every opportunity to discover new favorites in the genre. Edna, Mary, Wilma and Verna are the ladies of the Amish Cookie Club. They meet twice a month on Friday to bake cookies and socialize. In this first book in the series they task themselves with finding a job for Verna’s outspoken daughter, Myrna. Edna recommends Myrna to widower Ezekiel Riehl. Myrna accepts the job tending his house and four children. Ezekiel initially insists that he’s not looking for a second wife, but grows to admire Myrna. The Amish Cookie Club is a 5 out of 5 star read. The characters are vibrant and throughly realistic. The author fully introduces each lady and gives complete details of their family and interactions. It was a pleasure getting to know them. I’m not Amish but I could completely relate to these characters. I will definitely be reading the rest of this series. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys chaste romance, especially religious romance. If you don’t like religious themes, take a pass on this book. My thanks to Kensington Books and NetGalley for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this book. However the opinions expressed in this review are 100% mine and mine alone.
Marshathereader 9 months ago
The Amish Cookie Club by Sarah Price is a great, easy to read book. I loved the setting and the characters were all likeable and realistic. You get an honest view into the Amish and their lifestyle. Throw in an outspoken young lady that adds not only real life but humor. Some of Myrna's comments had me laughing out loud. The story will have you craving a cookie or two! I am anxiously waiting for book two. I was given an ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.
Barb00 9 months ago
The Amish Cookie Club is my first book I've read by Author Sarah Price. I enjoyed this book and I thought the author did an awesome job in her writing. The novel has a thorough plot with realistic characters. This book is Book One in The Amish Cookie Club Series. I highly recommend reading this book and I'm looking forward to Book Two. I received a copy from NetGalley, but was not required to review it. This review is one hundred percent my opinion.
Emma 9 months ago
The Amish Cookie Club by Sarah Price Every other Friday, Edna Esh and three of her childhood friends meet to bake sugar cookies for their respective church districts on worship Sunday. It’s a time to give to the Plain community—and give support to each other as they share their joys and fears . . . Edna’s friend, Verna Bontrager, has a problem. Her outspoken twenty-year-old daughter, Myrna, has been fired from her job. Again. Myrna’s family really needs her to chip in, but she’s clearly unsuited to customer service—not to mention that her sharp tongue scares away any boy who might come courting. But Edna has an idea—and his name is Ezekiel Riehl. A widower with four young children, Ezekiel needs help. His house and his brood are a mess; his demeanor is gruff. It’s no surprise Myrna takes an immediate dislike to him. Yet she has no choice but to take on the challenge—and soon she starts to create order out of chaos. In fact, the kids begin to depend on Myrna—and so does Ezekiel. The truth is, she’s fallen in love with him. But if he’s to prove he’s not looking for a marriage of convenience, he’ll have to convince her of what’s in his heart . . . Includes Cookie recipes! Edna and Elmer Esh Edna’s friend, Vera Bontrager Vera outspoken daughter Myrna Bontrager. Ezekiel Riehl A widower with four young children. Edna’s friends Mary Ropp,Wilma Schwartz,and Verna Bontrager. The smell of freshly baked cinnamon rolls always reminded Edna Esh of her mother. Lifting the pan toward her face, Edna shut her eyes and inhaled deeply, enjoying the warm steam that brushed against her cheeks as she savored the scent of freshly ground cinnamon. In the silence of the moment, she thought back to the days of her youth. Saturdays. Those were the mornings her mother baked cinnamon rolls at her father’s farm outside of Seyberts, Indiana. Farm life was always busy, but, even though all the children were home for the day, Saturday mornings were less chaotic for her mother. No school lunches to prepare, no faces to wash, no children to hurry off to school. With her brood filling the house with laughter, Edna’s mother was always in her glory. Back then, her gift to her children was those gloriously wonderful cinnamon rolls which began every weekend like a tasty note of love. “I’ll never understand you.” The teasing voice of her husband interrupted the moment. “Baking sweets before your friends visit so you can bake more sweets!” Opening her eyes, Edna smiled at Elmer. For almost thirty years, he’d been her husband, partner, and—most importantly—her best friend. She watched as he stood in the doorway, kicking off his work boots—one, two . . . each landing with a loud clomp on the mudroom floor—before entering the kitchen. He didn’t seem to notice the clumps of dirt which fell from the soles. Sighing, Edna made a mental note to sweep the floor before her friends arrived. He had already removed his hat, which had left his salt-and-pepper hair pressed flat against his head. “Seems you have those gals over more for visiting than for baking!” he teased. It was just after twelve thirty when the black buggy rolled into the driveway. Hearing the wheels rumbling on the gravel, Edna felt that familiar surge of joy. She hurried to the window and peered outside, smiling when she saw the horse stop by the barn. As usual, Verna had driven, stopping to pick up Mary first and then Wilma. And, as usual, the first woman to emerge from the buggy was Wilma. Her dark green dress still
3C 9 months ago
The Amish Cookie Club was an intriguing, entertaining, and heart-warming read from start to finish. Myrna Bontrager had me smiling, with her forthright comments and adventures. I appreciated that she was a little different from a stereotypical Amish heroine, and I enjoyed her analytical and caring personality. Her relationship with widower Ezekiel Riehl was evolving but not in an overwhelming fashion. Each character presented with distinct personalities, making you feel as if you actually knew them. I have read a number of Amish novels, but I had not previously come across much interpretation of the most conservative of their subgroups. The author's presentation was quite educational. The recipes enclosed at the conclusion of the story sound delicious, and I will be looking forward to the next book in this series. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher, through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
AFerri 9 months ago
This is a very well written book. The author makes you feel like you are there, you can feel all of the emotions and see all of the scenes in your mind. This book will keep you turning the pages to see what happens next. I really enjoyed reading this sweet Amish romance and loved the recipes at the end. Thank you Kensington Books Zebra via NetGalley for the ARC copy of this book. This is my honest opinion.
MaureenST 9 months ago
I really enjoyed this read, and I loved Myrna, a young out-spoken Amish woman, that if she was working for you, this is a possibility she could make you lose business. The Amish Cookie Club is a small group of women who now that their children are grown are looking for ways to get together and help their community. Of course, they discuss their problems and concerns, and thus our story blooms. Gossip, at its finest, the Amish grapevine working hard, and with twisted facts, will this young woman be able to help this widower. You can almost see these children bloom under Myrna’s organizational skills, and cookie making! I received this book through Net Galley and the Publisher Kensington, and was not required to give a positive review