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The Ancient World : Readings in Social and Cultural History / Edition 2
     

The Ancient World : Readings in Social and Cultural History / Edition 2

by D. Brendan Nagle, Stanley M. Burstein, Stanley Mayer Burstein, Stanley M. Burstein, D. Brendan Nagle
 

ISBN-10: 0130912506

ISBN-13: 9780130912503

Pub. Date: 06/01/1901

Publisher: Pearson

With its rich collection of texts dealing with social and cultural history from Egypt, the Ancient Near East, Greece and Rome, The Ancient World is the ideal complement to any textbook in Ancient History. The readings are organized thematically and each is provided with an informative introduction that aims to place the individual document in its proper

Overview

With its rich collection of texts dealing with social and cultural history from Egypt, the Ancient Near East, Greece and Rome, The Ancient World is the ideal complement to any textbook in Ancient History. The readings are organized thematically and each is provided with an informative introduction that aims to place the individual document in its proper historical context.

The new edition has been thoroughly revised and many new texts added. Among the new readings are selections from the Mesopotamian Epic of Gilgamesh, Persian Royal Inscriptions, Hesiod's Works and Days, a Roman pamphlet on how to get elected, the recently discovered Vindolanda Tablets from a fort in Roman Britain, and documents relating to peasant life, marriage, abortion and sacred prostitution.

The Ancient World organizes its reading around the following themes:

  • Temples and Priests
  • Palace and Kings
  • Daily Life in Egypt and the Ancient Near East
  • The Origin and Spread of the Polis System
  • Warfare and the Polis
  • Husbands, Wives, and Slaves: The Domestic Foundations of the
  • Polis
  • Empire and Democracy: The Classical Polis
  • The Hellenistic Age
  • The Political Culture of the Roman Republic
  • War and Warfare in the Roman Republic
  • Society and Culture in the Roman Republic
  • The Roman Revolution
  • The Roman Peace
  • Society and Culture in the Roman Empire
  • Daily Life in the Roman Empire
  • The Transformed Empire

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780130912503
Publisher:
Pearson
Publication date:
06/01/1901
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
354
Product dimensions:
6.76(w) x 10.98(h) x 0.69(d)

Table of Contents

1. Temples and Priests.
Flood Stories. Divinity and Its Limitations. The Gods in Their Temples: A Sacred Marriage Drama. Sacred Prostitution. Covenant and Consequences. The Call of the Prophet. Prophets and Palaces: Jeremiah Confronts The King. “I Will Be with Him in Trouble” : Personal Religion and Piety. Empire, Exile, and Monotheism. Tombs and Immortality.

2. Palaces and Kings.
Loyalty to the King: The Egyptian Theory of Government. But if Pharaoh Fails. Women in Power. A Critique of Kingship: The Negative View of Samuel. War and Warfare. “A Palace of Cedar, Cypress, Juniper … and Tamarisk” : Builders as Well as Destroyers. An Imperial Coup d'Etat: The Behistun Inscription of Darius I. “That the Strong Might Not Oppress the Weak, and That They Should Give Justice to Orphans and Widows.”

3. Daily Life.
Marriage and Property. Marriage and Children. Laws Regarding Sex. Disputes, Litigation, Punishment. Papyrus Lansing: A Bureaucrat's View of Life. “Wash and Perfume Yourself and Put on Your Best Clothes.”

4. The Origin and Spread of the Polis System.
A Greek Definition of the Polis. Greek Life in the Eighth Century B.C. 1: The Shield of Achilles. Greek Life in the Eighth Century B.C. 2: Hesiod's Works and Days. Colonization and the Expansion of the Polis System: The Case of Cyrene. Greeks and Non-Greeks in the Greek Colonies: The Foundation of Lampsacus. Greeks andScythians in the Black Sea: Coexistence and Interaction.

5. Warfare and the Polis.
The Aristocratic Warrior. The Hoplite Revolution and the Citizen Soldier. The Hoplite Polis: Sparta. Heroic Athletics: The Chariot Race at Patroclus' Funeral Games. An Athletic Dynasty: The Diagorids of Rhodes. Athletics and the Polis: A Philosophical Critique.

6. The Crisis of the Archaic Polis.
The Crisis of the Aristocracy 1: The Laments of Theognis. The Crisis of the Aristocracy 2: Corinth. The Crisis of the Aristocracy 3: Athens.

7. Husbands, Wives, and Slaves: The Domestic Foundations of the Polis.
The Education of a Wife. The Short Sad Life of a Good Woman: The Epitaph of Sokratea of Paros. If Only We Could Reproduce without Women … ! Slaves: The Best and Most Necessary of Possessions. “We Have Mistresses for Our Pleasure” : Sex and Slavery in the Oikos. Freedom and Its Problems: The Life of Neaera. How to Become a Slave: Be in the Wrong Place at the Wrong Time. The Slave Trade: A Eunuch's Revenge.

8. Empire and Democracy: The Classical Polis.
The Golden Age: A Greek View. The Athenian Empire: Origins and Structure. Imperial Democracy: A Critical View. Athens and Her Subjects: The Case of Erythrae. Imperial Democracy: A Favorable View—Pericles' Funeral Oration (Selections). The Plague at Athens. War and Politics: The Case of Corcyra. “War Is a Hard Master” : The Melian Dialoque. Religion in the Classical Polis: The Affair of the Herms. Defeat and Hard Times: Athens After the Peloponnesian War. Personal Religion in Classical Greece: The Case of Xenophon.

9. The Hellenistic Age.
Alexander the Great: Two Contrasting Views. Alexandria and the Colonial World of Hellenistic Egypt. Culture Contact, Culture Clash: Religion and Society in the Hellenistic World. “Ptolemy Is a Good Paymaster” : Opportunities and Social Roles in the Hellenistic Period.

10. Political Culture of the Roman Republic.
Order and Liberty: The Monarchy and the Republic. The Importance of Concord: Secession and Concession. Values That Made Rome Great.

11. War and Warfare.
The Enemy: A Roman View. Roman Ferocity: “Decius … Summoning and Dragging to Himself the Army Devoted Along with Him.” Steadiness of the Romans: How They Coped with Defeat. The Complexities of War: Foreign and Domestic Issues. The Sack of Carthage. The Triumphal Parade of Aemilius Paullus. War as Personal Vengeance.

12. Society and Culture in the Republic.
“Secret Rites Performed at Night” : The Bacchanalian Conspiracy. Patricians and Plebeians: Patrons and Clients. Patria Potestas and Materna Auctoritas: The Power of Fathers and Mothers Over Their Children. Marriage: Legalities and Realities. The Rape of Chiomara. “A Wife without a Dowry Is Under Her Husband's Thumb.” “Sell Worn-Out Oxen … Old and Sick Slaves.” Economics of Farming.

13. The Roman Revolution.
“Greed, Unlimited and Unrestrained, Corrupted and Destroyed Everything.” Social and Economic Conditions: The Gracchi. Politicians and Generals Out of Control. Social and Cultural Changes. Women of the Late Republic: Standing Up to the Triumvirs. The Augustan Settlement. The Reforms of Augustus. Reaction to Augustus' Moral Reforms.

14. The Roman Peace.
“They Make a Desert and Call It Peace” : A View of Rome from the Provinces. Foreigners in the Roman Army. The Alternative: “If the Romans Are Driven Out What Else Can There Be Except Wars Among All These Nations?” A Roman View of Foreign Competition. “Nations by the Thousands … Serve the Masters of the Entire World” : What Held the Roman Empire Together. Making It at Rome. Provincial Administration: Hands-On Style. Getting Along Together: The Role of Citizenship. The Role of Law.

15. Society and Culture in the Roman Empire.
Obligations of the Rich. Imperial Obligations. Religions and Moralities.

16. Daily Life in the Roman Empire.
Peasant Life. City Life. Family Life.

17. The Transformed Empire.
“Now Declining into Old Age” : A Review of Roman History from a Late Empire Viewpoint. New Founders of Rome: Diocletian and Constantine. Constantine and Christianity. The Majesty of Emperors: Desires and Realities. Christianity, Rome, and Classical Culture. The Fall of Rome.

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