The Annotated Wind in the Willows, for Adults and Sensible Children (or, possibly, Children and Sensible Adults)

The Annotated Wind in the Willows, for Adults and Sensible Children (or, possibly, Children and Sensible Adults)

by GMW Wemyss

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Overview

An annotated edition of Kenneth Grahame's classic tale of the middle Thames, the Wild Wood and River Bank, and the incorrigible Mr Toad; made richer yet by historical and literary cross-references by two historians who have loved the book all their lives long. Contains almost 350 footnotes and critical insights.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940044635685
Publisher: Bapton Books
Publication date: 07/05/2013
Series: Bapton Books Annotated Classics
Sold by: Smashwords
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 239 KB

About the Author

Parliamentary historian, chronicler of Titanic’s sinking and Churchill’s ascent, annotator of Kipling and of Kenneth Grahame: GMW Wemyss lives and writes, wisely pseudonymously, in Wilts. Having, by invoking the protective colouration of tweeds, cricket (he was a dry bob at school), and country matters, somehow evaded immersion in Mercury whilst up at University, he survived to become the West Country’s beloved essayist; author or co-author of histories of the Narvik Debate, the fall of Chamberlain and the rise of Churchill, of 1937 – that year of portent – and of the UK and US enquiries into the sinking of Titanic; and co-editor and co-annotator of Kipling’s Mowgli stories and Kenneth Grahame.

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The Annotated Wind in the Willows, for Adults and Sensible Children (or, possibly, Children and Sensible Adults) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Thaumbody More than 1 year ago
The copious annotations of this version enrich the story. There are explanations of which species are being referred to in the text. The history and definition of some of the terms. Plus the two editors show a great deal of whimsy and humor in their explanations, though they can be quite serious when warranted.