The Assassin's Accomplice, movie tie-in: Mary Surratt and the Plot to Kill Abraham Lincoln

The Assassin's Accomplice, movie tie-in: Mary Surratt and the Plot to Kill Abraham Lincoln

by Kate Clifford Larson

Paperback(Media tie-in)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780465024414
Publisher: Basic Books
Publication date: 02/22/2011
Edition description: Media tie-in
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 469,859
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range: 13 - 18 Years

About the Author

Kate Clifford Larson teaches history at Simmons College. Her first book, Bound for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman, Portrait of an American Hero, was described as “brilliant” (Smithsonian Magazine), “astonishingly good, a better debut than any author has the right to wish for” (Dallas Morning News), and “an extraordinary achievement” (Baltimore Sun). Larson lives in Winchester, Massachusetts.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

Spectator
“Larson captures brilliantly the atmosphere of Mary Surratt’s trial in a crowded court room — murder trials attract morbid spectators — during the sweltering heat of a Washington summer. Her description of the drama of Mary’s last hours, when she was broken by a death sentence that neither she nor her lawyers had believed possible, makes compelling reading.”

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The Assassin's Accomplice, movie tie-in: Mary Surratt and the Plot to Kill Abraham Lincoln 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
WritermomHB More than 1 year ago
Was Justice Served? Was Mary Surratt, a Southern-sympathizing, Catholic widow, one of the participants in the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln? She was hanged for it. Was that justice? The author went into this book, she says, with the idea that Mrs. Surratt was not nearly as involved in this event as the charges she faced in the military tribunal where she was tried. However, she says, the research she did indicated that Mrs. Surratt was much more involved than even the charges covered. The author did a great deal of research to write this book. I found it difficult to read and not very enjoyable. Many phrases used indicated the author’s belief in Mrs. Surratt’s guilt. The many sources used were listed at the end of the book. She did a very good job of explaining the physical conditions in the courtroom and in the jail cells, as well as the newspapers’ reporting and crowds. I found the writing seemed to be from a Northern point of view. Due to the difficult reading and point of view, I would be careful in recommending this book to anyone. As with any supposed book of historical truth, I would check sources, also.