The Berenstain Bears Chapter Book Collection: Ten Books in One

The Berenstain Bears Chapter Book Collection: Ten Books in One

by Stan Berenstain, Jan Berenstain

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781504046138
Publisher: Open Road Media
Publication date: 05/16/2017
Series: Berenstain Bears Series
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 1290
Sales rank: 97,093
File size: 54 MB
Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range: 8 - 11 Years

About the Author

Stan Berenstain (1923–2005) and Jan Berenstain (1923–2012) were a husband-and-wife cartooning team best known for creating the internationally beloved Berenstain Bears. Both born in Philadelphia, they met on the first day of art school, and were married after World War II. Inspired by their children’s love for Dr. Seuss, the Berenstains created a cartoon version of their own family, and with The Big Honey Hunt (1962) began a series that would stretch to more than two hundred volumes. Starring Papa Bear, Mama Bear, Sister Bear, and Brother Bear, the books quickly became popular for their evocative drawings and simple explanations of wholesome themes. The stories sold more than 200 million copies worldwide and have been adapted as movies, television shows, and amusement park attractions. The Berenstains’ younger son, Mike, has overseen the series since his parents passed away, ensuring that it will continue to be popular with each new generation of young readers.     
Stan Berenstain (1923–2005) and Jan Berenstain (1923–2012) were a husband-and-wife cartooning team best known for creating the internationally beloved Berenstain Bears. Both born in Philadelphia, they met on the first day of art school, and were married after World War II. Inspired by their children’s love for Dr. Seuss, the Berenstains created a cartoon version of their own family, and with The Big Honey Hunt (1962) began a series that would stretch to more than two hundred volumes. Starring Papa Bear, Mama Bear, Sister Bear, and Brother Bear, the books quickly became popular for their evocative drawings and simple explanations of wholesome themes. The stories sold more than 200 million copies worldwide and have been adapted as movies, television shows, and amusement park attractions. The Berenstains’ younger son, Mike, has overseen the series since his parents passed away, ensuring that it will continue to be popular with each new generation of young readers.      

Read an Excerpt

The Berenstain Bears Chapter Book Collection

Ten Books in One


By Stan Berenstain, Jan Berenstain

OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA

Copyright © 2000 Berenstain Enterprises, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-5040-4613-8



CHAPTER 1

New Cub in Town


One fall evening, as the sun set and the moon rose over the Bear family's tree house, the Bears were gathered in the living room. Each was doing something different. Mama sat on the sofa going through the week's expenses. Sister had her schoolbooks spread out on the floor and was doing homework. Both had half an ear tuned in to what was going on between Papa and Brother. That seemed much more interesting. Papa sat in his big easy chair. He was looking at a math test that Brother had brought home for him to sign.

"C-minus isn't up to your standard, Son," Papa said with a frown. "You're usually pretty good at math. What went wrong?"

"Well," said Brother, "it was a surprise quiz, and I've been pretty busy lately. You know there's football practice and the chess team. And I'm cramming for the quiz bowl."

"Do you think that maybe you're trying to do a little too much?" asked Papa.

"But I'm going for the All-Around Cub award this year and —"

"That's a fine goal," said Papa. "But if this paper is any sign, you might end up being the All-Around Washout. What would you think of that?" Just then the phone rang. Papa reached for it.

"Saved by the bell," Sister whispered to Brother.

"Phew!" he said.

"Why, hello, Professor," Papa said. He sounded surprised.

Sister said, "It must be Professor Actual Factual. I wonder what he's calling about."

"Beats me," said Brother.

Professor Actual Factual was Bear Country's leading scientist. He was also the head of the famous Bearsonian Institution. He was a good friend of the Bear family. But he didn't telephone the Bears — or anyone — very often. He was much too busy with his studies and experiments at the museum. So Papa and the rest of the family were quite surprised when he called.

"Hmm," Papa said into the telephone. "Yes, Professor, I see. Of course. Brother and Sister will be glad to help. You can count on us, Professor. Good night."

Mama and the cubs were almost exploding with curiosity as Papa hung up. "Well, what was that about?" they asked all together.

Papa scratched his head. He looked a bit puzzled. "Dear, did you know that Actual Factual has a brother?" he asked Mama.

"No," she said. She raised her eyebrows. "And?" "And the brother has a wife and a son," said Papa.

"And?" said Mama.

"And both the brother and his wife are scientists. They work in faraway places and dig up stuff."

"And that's why Actual Factual called — just to tell us that?" asked Mama.

"No," said Papa. "It seems the brother and his wife are going far away on a 'dig.' And they have sent their son to live with Actual Factual for a while. Little Ferdinand — his nickname is Ferdy — will be going to Bear Country School. The professor wants Brother and Sister to introduce him around school."

"You can do that, can't you?" Mama asked the cubs.

"Sure," said Brother. "We'll pick him up tomorrow morning on the way to school."

"Thanks, cubs," said Papa with a smile. "Professor Actual Factual has done so many good things for Bear Country over the years. It will be nice to have a chance to help him out."

CHAPTER 2

A Walk on the Nerdy Side


The next morning, Brother and Sister stopped by Cousin Fred's house first to pick him up. Then the three cubs headed for the Bearsonian Institution.

Professor Actual Factual and his nephew were just coming out the front door when the cubs arrived. The professor waved to them and hurried down the path. He didn't seem to notice that his nephew was taking his own good time in following.

To the cubs, little Ferdy looked like a smaller version of his uncle. He wore thick glasses, a tweed knicker suit, a maroon cap, a turtleneck, and leggings.

"Hello, cubs," said the professor. "I would like you to meet my nephew, Ferdinand Factual. Ferdy, I'd like you to meet your new friends, Brother, Sister, and Cousin —" The professor stopped speaking when he saw that Ferdy was still only halfway up the path. "Please excuse Ferdy," he whispered. "Perhaps he's a bit nervous about meeting you."

But as they watched Ferdy get closer, the cubs didn't think he looked a bit nervous. He walked slowly, with his hands in his pockets and a bored look on his face. The cubs could see Ferdy was in no great hurry to meet them.

"Ferdy," said Actual Factual again once his nephew reached them. "I'd like you to meet Brother, Sister, and their cousin Fred." The cubs each gave Ferdy a big smile. Then they put out their hands to shake. Ferdy's hands stayed right where they were — in his jacket pockets. And he kept right on looking bored.

"Which of you is which?" he asked. He looked coolly from one cub to another.

"This is Sister, this is Brother, and I'm Fred," answered Cousin Fred.

"Well, shall we get on with it?" said Ferdy. He looked down the road. "I'm most curious about the 'school experience.'"

The four continued on their way to school. Sister asked Ferdy what he had meant about being curious about the "school experience."

"Oh, I've never been to school in my life," said Ferdy.

"My goodness!" cried Sister. "You're going to need a lot of help with everything: reading, writing, math —"

"Oh, my parents taught me all that when I was half your age," said Ferdy. "They're top scientists, you know. Father is a paleontologist and Mother is an archaeologist. I'm sure they are better teachers than you could find in any school." He said the last word as if it meant something totally worthless. "Do you know what a paleontologist is?"

Cousin Fred started to answer. One of his hobbies was reading the dictionary for fun. So of course he knew what a paleontologist was.

But Ferdy held up a hand and said, "I asked Sister." Brother looked at Ferdy. He could tell that the new cub was trying to embarrass her.

Sister frowned. She thought hard for a moment. "Pail-ee-on-tol-o-gist," she said. "Someone who makes pails?"

Ferdy smiled for the first time since the cubs had met him. Then he threw back his head and laughed out loud. "Ha-ha-ha!" he roared. Tears formed in his eyes. "Someone who makes pails! That's priceless! And I suppose an ark-ee-ol-o-gist is someone who makes ships? He-he-he!" He wiped his eyes. "I guess you haven't learned those words in school yet. Right?"

"Paleontologist: a scientist who studies fossils," said Cousin Fred. He sounded angry. "And an archaeologist is someone who finds and studies artifacts from the past."

Ferdy looked surprised. "Not bad," he said to Fred. "What's your IQ?" Fred shrugged. "I'm not sure. What's yours?"

"Oh, you're better off not knowing," said Ferdy, yawning. Then he added, "It's off the charts."

Sister didn't like being laughed at. Not one bit. She was about to tell Ferdy so. But she remembered she was supposed to be helping the professor. So she smiled and said, "Which one of your parents makes the fossils?"

"Studies fossils," said Ferdy. "As I already said, that's Father. And what does your father do?"

"He's a carpenter," answered Sister proudly. "He makes tables and chairs and stuff."

"Oh?" Ferdy chuckled. He looked down his nose at Sister. "What is his specialty: tables, chairs, or stuff?"

Brother was so angry at Ferdy for making fun of Papa that he stopped and grabbed Ferdy's arm. "My papa's good at everything!" he snapped.

The bored look on Ferdy's face didn't change. "Would you mind letting go of my arm, Brother?" he said coolly. "There is no need to be uncivilized."

"Sorry," Brother mumbled. He let go. "Let's just drop the subject."

Ferdy arched his eyebrows. "So you don't want to talk about your father. Then what about your mother? What does she do?"

"Never mind," said Brother. He started walking again.

But Sister was determined to put in a good word for Mama. She thought about the many things Mama did. She knew they were all wonderful things, but somehow she felt that Ferdy wouldn't agree. Suddenly she had an idea. "She's a quiltologist!" said Sister.

Brother and Cousin Fred couldn't believe their ears. A sly smile slowly started at the corners of Ferdy's mouth. Ferdy looked at Sister. "Oh, I see," he said. "Now don't tell me — let me guess. Quiltologist. Hmm. I suppose you would think that that would be someone who makes quilts. Am I right?" Sister stared straight ahead. With her jaw set, she nodded firmly.

Ferdy howled with laughter. "A quiltologist! Ha-ha-ha! Priceless!"

Sister was angry. So were Brother and Cousin Fred. Hmm, they thought. Being nice to this cub was going to be easier said than done. But Ferdy's laughter had died down. He had seen something in the distance.

"Excuse me a moment," he said. He took a small notebook and pen from his pocket. "I am most interested in Bear Country's flora and fauna." He hurried ahead. Then he began making notes in his little book.

The cubs slowed down. They walked well behind Ferdy. "I don't know anyone named Flora or Fauna," said Sister. "Who is he talking about?"

"'Flora' means plants and 'fauna' means animals," said Cousin Fred.

Brother shook his head and made a face. "Is this cub for real? What a nerd!" "He's more than a nerd," said Sister. "He's a big pain!"

"He's more than that," said Cousin Fred. "He's the most stuck-up cub I've ever met! That's what bothers me — not that he's smart."

Cousin Fred, a math and science whiz, had been called a nerd a few times himself. So he really didn't like all this nerd talk.

"Just because he's smart is no reason to dislike him," he told Brother.

"You're right," said Brother. "It's the way he acts that gets to me, not his smarts."

"But we've still got to look out for him," said Sister. "We promised the professor."

Bear Country School was in sight now. Brother looked ahead. Too-Tall Grizzly and his gang were standing in their usual place in front of the school entrance.

"I'm afraid Ferdy's going to need a lot of looking out for," Brother said.

CHAPTER 3

Ferdy Meets TooTall


The Too-Tall gang liked to stand in front of the school entrance because that's where they could make the most trouble. That's what they were doing when Brother, Sister, and Fred brought Ferdy to school — making trouble. They were tripping cubs, throwing spitballs, and grabbing girls' hats and tossing them into trees.

Lately the gang had been acting up more than usual. The cubs figured it was because Too-Tall was trying to impress Queenie McBear. Everyone knew he had a major crush on her!

As Ferdy walked toward the gang, Too-Tall looked over at Queenie and turned to Skuzz, his right-hand cub. "Hey," he said, "get a load of what's coming down the road."

"Oh, boy," said Skuzz. His eyes lit up. "This is gonna be fun."

Ferdy was supposed to report to the school office. But he couldn't get in. The Too-Tall gang was blocking the entrance. "Well, well," said Too-Tall. He looked down at Ferdy. "If it isn't a visitor from the planet Nerd!"

The gang howled with laughter. Cubs began to gather around to see what was going on. Ferdy just looked up at Too-Tall with his normal bored expression.

"He's Actual Factual's nephew and his name is Ferdy," said Brother. "He has to report to the office, so you'd better get out of the way."

Too-Tall glanced over his shoulder at the row of gang members behind him. "Get out of the way for Nerdy Ferdy?" He laughed. "You've got to be kidding!"

"Who is this individual?" Ferdy asked Brother calmly.

"Who're you calling an individual?" asked Too-Tall.

"His name is Too-Tall," said Sister to Ferdy. "And he's bad news."

Ferdy took out his notebook and began writing in it. Too-Tall frowned. "What are you writing, Nerdy Ferdy?"

Without looking up, Ferdy said, "Not that it's any of your business, but it's my practice to make notes on local fauna."

"What's 'fauna'?" asked Too-Tall suspiciously.

"'Fauna' means animal life," said Sister. That made Queenie laugh.

"Why, that creepy little nerd," growled Too-Tall.

Queenie folded her arms across her cheerleader sweater. She winked at Ferdy. "I think he's kind of cute," she said sweetly.

"Oh, yeah?" said Too-Tall. Finally he stepped aside to let the cubs pass. "We'll see how cute he is after me and the gang get through with him at recess."

Ferdy kept taking notes as they made their way to the office. Suddenly he pointed to the school's trophy case. "What are these strange artifacts?" he asked.

"What's 'artifacts'?" asked Sister.

"Artifact," said Cousin Fred. "A made object; product of a culture or civilization."

"This is the school's trophy case," Brother said proudly. "And these are the trophies won by the school sports teams."

All at once Brother had an idea. Maybe he could talk Ferdy into joining the school's quiz-bowl team. That way Ferdy would feel more as if he belonged. And it would take some pressure off Brother. But even before Brother could open his mouth, Ferdy spoiled the thought.

"Ah, yes, sports," he said. "The opiate of the mindless."

"Opiate," said Cousin Fred. "Anything that dulls the brain ..."

"Never mind!" said Brother. He clenched his fists. "I know an insult when I hear one!" He turned angrily to his new "friend." But Ferdy had already entered the school office to enroll.

CHAPTER 4

Who or Whom?


Ferdy Factual was placed in Teacher Bob's class with Brother, Cousin Fred, Queenie, and Too-Tall and his gang. As Ferdy took his seat in the back row, Teacher Bob asked him if he had reported to the office yet.

"Of course," said Ferdy. "I would never have entered the school without having first presented myself at the office."

"I see," said Teacher Bob. "Who did you talk to?"

"Whom did you talk to," Ferdy corrected.

There was a mixture of gasps, groans, and laughter from the other pupils. Teacher Bob looked at his new student and smiled to himself. He could see that this cub was going to be difficult.

"You're right, of course, Ferdy," he said in a friendly voice. "'Whom' is correct." Then he turned to the class and said, "Can anyone tell me why 'whom' is correct?"

Brother raised his hand and was called on. "Because it is the object of the preposition," he said.

"Very good," said Teacher Bob.

Ferdy rolled his eyes and said, "Oh, that was a toughie."

But Teacher Bob wasn't finished. Ferdy still needed to be shown who was in charge. "But when I asked Ferdy that question," he went on, "I was speaking in the vernacular." He turned to the blackboard and wrote VER-NAC-U-LAR. "Does anyone know what 'vernacular' means?"

Cousin Fred's hand shot up. "Vernacular: the speech or language of a place; the plain language in daily use by ordinary people."

Ferdy mumbled something about "ordinary, stupid people."

Teacher Bob pretended not to hear what Ferdy had said. "I'll put it to you this way, Ferdy," he said. "Don't you agree that 'who' is all right for everyday use, even in a classroom?"

"Yes, I suppose so," said Ferdy. "Now may we get on with whatever it is you do here?"

Again, the other pupils gasped and groaned. But this time there wasn't much laughter.

Somehow, Teacher Bob kept his temper. He had had pupils like Ferdy before. He knew all about super-smart cubs who had trouble getting along with the other cubs. He decided to work hard to make Ferdy feel comfortable. But he knew it wouldn't be easy. Ferdy already seemed to be the toughest case that he had ever seen.

Brother Bear felt sick about Ferdy's bad behavior. I could kill that little pill, he thought.

CHAPTER 5

Recess Rowdies


Teacher Bob tried hard to help Ferdy feel more like a member of the class. But he had little luck. Making Ferdy feel at home was not an easy job.

By the time recess rolled around, Ferdy had found four errors in his textbooks. And he had corrected the teacher's grammar three more times.

Teacher Bob was almost ready to give up on Ferdy. And the class was completely fed up with him.

At recess, Brother and Cousin Fred were so disgusted with him that they were tempted to leave Ferdy to deal on his own with Too-Tall and his gang.

"That may be what he deserves," said Brother. But all the same, he and Cousin Fred searched for Ferdy on the playground. "We promised Actual Factual that we would look out for Ferdy, so that's what we're going to do," said Brother.

Just then he spied Ferdy and stopped. "Uh-oh. It's worse than I thought," he said.

Ferdy was walking along with Queenie McBear. As the two walked and talked, Ferdy wrote in his notebook. Queenie seemed to be hanging on his every word.

"Wow," said Cousin Fred. "Who would have thought that Queenie would go for a nerd — er, I mean a stuck-up jerk — like Ferdy?"

"Give me a break, Fred," said Brother. "She doesn't really like Ferdy. I don't even know if she really likes Too-Tall. I think she's just trying to make trouble so she can sit back and enjoy the fireworks."

"Speaking of fireworks," said Fred, "here come Too-Tall and the gang now."

Too-Tall and his gang were headed straight for Ferdy. They couldn't miss him. He stuck out like a sore thumb, with his strange clothes and red-framed glasses. He especially stuck out next to Queenie. She was one of the coolest cubs in the whole school.

"Hey, nerd, what'd you write about me in that stupid book?" growled Too-Tall. He grabbed the notebook from Ferdy. "Hey, here's my name!" he said. "'Too Tall: Schoolyardus bullyus.' What's that supposed to mean?"


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Berenstain Bears Chapter Book Collection by Stan Berenstain, Jan Berenstain. Copyright © 2000 Berenstain Enterprises, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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The Berenstain Bears Chapter Book Collection: Ten Books in One 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thnk it mite inprove your gramar a littlle. And it is a very funby storry book colection
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This collection is very entertaining.