The Black-Eyed Blonde: A Philip Marlowe Novel

The Black-Eyed Blonde: A Philip Marlowe Novel

by Benjamin Black
3.8 13

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Overview

The Black-Eyed Blonde: A Philip Marlowe Novel by Benjamin Black

Raymond Chandler's incomparable private eye is back, pulled by a seductive young heiress into the most difficult and dangerous case of his career

"It was one of those summer Tuesday afternoons when you begin to wonder if the earth has stopped revolving. The telephone on my desk had the look of something that knows it's being watched. Traffic trickled by in the street below, and there were a few pedestrians, too, men in hats going nowhere."

So begins The Black-Eyed Blonde, a new novel featuring Philip Marlowe—yes, that Philip Marlowe. Channeling Raymond Chandler, Benjamin Black has brought Marlowe back to life for a new adventure on the mean streets of Bay City, California. It is the early 1950s, Marlowe is as restless and lonely as ever, and business is a little slow. Then a new client is shown in: young, beautiful, and expensively dressed, she wants Marlowe to find her former lover, a man named Nico Peterson. Marlowe sets off on his search, but almost immediately discovers that Peterson's disappearance is merely the first in a series of bewildering events. Soon he is tangling with one of Bay City's richest families and developing a singular appreciation for how far they will go to protect their fortune.
Only Benjamin Black, a modern master of the genre, could write a new Philip Marlowe detective novel that has all the panache and charm of the originals while delivering a story that is as sharp and fresh as today's best crime fiction.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780805098150
Publisher: Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 03/04/2014
Series: Philip Marlowe Series
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 96,905
File size: 602 KB

About the Author

Benjamin Black is the pen name of the Man Booker Prize-winning novelist John Banville. The author of the bestselling and critically acclaimed series of Quirke novels—including Christine Falls, Vengeance, and Holy Orders—he lives in Dublin.
Benjamin Black is the pen name of the Man Booker Prize-winning novelist John Banville. The author of the bestselling and critically acclaimed series of Quirke novels—as well as The Black-Eyed Blonde, a Philip Marlowe novel—he lives in Dublin.

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The Black-Eyed Blonde: A Philip Marlowe Novel 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
memorymaker More than 1 year ago
I loved this book.  I find this style of writing very intriguing.  I love the Philip Marlowe series and Benjamin Black has hit the nail on the head for this style.  I hope he writes more.  If you loved the Dragnet series, you'll love this book.  Yes it goes a little slow, but that's the way Philip Marlowe books are written, they give a detailed look at the world around him and into his mind.  I for one am a fan, but I think you should try it and see for yourself, then make your own decision.  Thanks Mr. Black
gloriafeit More than 1 year ago
John Banville, the Irish author here writing under his pen name of Benjamin Black, has written a book certain to give exquisite pleasure to the many fans of Raymond Chandler and his creation, LA private detective Philip Marlowe with a reputation as a “thinking man’s detective.”. The masterful re-imagining is evident from the first words: “It was one of those Tuesday afternoons in summer when you wonder if the earth has stopped revolving. The telephone on my desk had the air of something that knows it’s being watched. Cars trickled past in the street below the dusty window of my office, and a few of the good folks of our fair city ambled along the sidewalk, men in hats, mostly, going nowhere.” The eponymous woman makes her first appearance moments later. “Her hair was blond and her eyes were black, black and deep as a mountain lake, the lids exquisitely tapered at their outer corners. A blonde with black eyes - - that’s not a combination you get very often.” As Marlow later summarized things, he is “hired to look for a guy who was supposed to be dead. Next thing I know I’m up to my knees in corpses, and I damn near became a corpse myself.” What happens in between, taking place in a little more than a week, is laid out in Chandler-esque form, with a wholly unexpected ending. To say that Mr. Banville has “captured” the charm of that author seems inadequate. Apparently this title was one that Chandler had listed as a possibility for a future novel, and Mr. Banville has made of it a terrific mystery. He evokes the Marlowe era perfectly, conjuring up memories with names like the Marx Brothers, Paul Whiteman, Lon Chaney, Raymond Burr, and Errol Flynn. I highly recommend that you give yourself the deep pleasure of reading this book.
Basil More than 1 year ago
Author Benjamin Black has been a lifetime fan of Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe detective stories. Chandler provided the title for this story (and others) in his work diary, but never got into the narrative. Now Black (pseudonym for writer John Banville) has stepped in with a well-tuned ear for the detective's hardboiled vernacular, giving us the thrills and mayhem of 1930's Los Angeles underworld. Marlowe's client this time is the gorgeous Clare Cavendish. "That smile: it was like something she had set a match to a long time ago and then left to smolder on by itself," Marlowe recalls. Clare's looking for a man named Nico Peterson and wants Marlowe on the case. "Friend of yours?" Marlowe asks."He used to be my lover..."Used to be?"..."Yes. He disappeared rather mysteriously, without ever saying goodbye." It isn't long before the two are quibbling over the proper use of language. "Did Mr. Peterson give any indication that he was about to decamp? I asked. "Decamp? That's an odd word to use," she replied. "It seemed less dramatic than 'disappeared,' which was your word," Marlowe counters. And so it goes.
colo48 More than 1 year ago
Excellent Chandleresque style: Hard-drinking gumshoe Marlowe, beautiful mysterious woman client, hot summer in LA. However the plot is a confusing, hot mess. Too man shady characters, with no obvious relation ship.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Omg this book is so interesting!! I love it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Seams show. You have to really be a fan of the author and i am not. Nero Wolf s are good and Spenser and a couple others but i liked the originals and wanted them to continue like all the sherlock homes stuff.
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Oh.....