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The Black-out Book: 500 Family Games and Puzzles for Wartime Entertainment
     

The Black-out Book: 500 Family Games and Puzzles for Wartime Entertainment

by Evelyn August, Mike Brown
 

"Of all modern notions, the worst is this: that domesticity is dull. Inside the home, they say, is dead decorum and routine; outside is adventure and variety. But the truth is that home is the only place of liberty, the only spot on earth where a man [sic] can alter arrangements suddenly, make an experiment or indulge a whim." --G.K. Chesterton

Thus begins

Overview

"Of all modern notions, the worst is this: that domesticity is dull. Inside the home, they say, is dead decorum and routine; outside is adventure and variety. But the truth is that home is the only place of liberty, the only spot on earth where a man [sic] can alter arrangements suddenly, make an experiment or indulge a whim." --G.K. Chesterton

Thus begins the Black-Out Book. At once a time capsule and a paean to domestic tranquility, the Black-Out brings together over five hundred games, pens_es, puzzles, jokes, and literary snippets a simpler, yet in many ways more dangerous time than our own. Published during one of the darkest hours of British history, a time when curfews and rationing kept people close to their homes, the book offers insights into a bygone time, but can still delight 70 years on.

While some passages are specific to 1940's England--'A thought for the petrol-rationed motorist' and 'What happened to the shilling?'--others are truly timeless--'Prayers of the Great' (Henry VIII, Raleigh, Plato), and 'What to do when sleep won't come.'

Published to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the start of WWII, but also at a time when Americans are turning once again toward domestic pleasures, the Black-Out Book is destined to find a new audience in the 21st century.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“The Black-Out Book...really is something that still fulfils its purpose of helping to while away a spare moment. We may not have any air raids going on at the moment, thank goodness, but the world still has plenty of troubles and we need to be distracted from time to time to keep our heads.” —Bill Purdue, Bill Purdue's Book Blog (November 2009)

“The Black-out Book collects some of August's wartime-effort work. There are brainteasers, riddles, cartoons, poems, astronomy lessons, limericks, trivia, quotes, word games and other miscellany, all as presented originally, with vintage illustrations and fonts. August's style is buttoned-up British as ever, which makes the book radiate with a slight time-capsule charm.” —Rod Lott, Bookgasm.com (January 2010)

“As I flipped through The Black-Out Book with amusement, I still could not help it but ask myself how many war time children kept themselves occupied with the very same puzzles and games that I had just read? How many parents, while reading the limericks from this book to their children, used this book to get away from missing their loved ones on the front lines or to take their minds off of the possibility that German bombers might arrive over their cities that night?” —C. Peter Chen, World War II Database, ww2db.com (March 2010)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781846039232
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
10/13/2009
Series:
General Military Series
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
4.80(w) x 7.40(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author


Born in Beckenham in 1907, the late Sydney Box (1907-83) was a writer and film producer, producing such classics as The Seventh Veil (1945, which won him a best screenplay Oscar), Holiday Camp and Quartet. His film company Verity Films produced over 100 propaganda shorts for the government and the services during the Second World War. Managing director of Gainsborough Pictures (1946-49), he became an independent producer in the 1950s, forming Sydney Box Associates. Most of his screenplays were written in collaboration with his late wife, Muriel. Their collaborative work was published under the pseudonym "Evelyn August." The Muriel and Sydney Box Collection is located at the British Film Institute.

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