The Broken Ones: A Novel

The Broken Ones: A Novel

by Stephen M. Irwin
5.0 2

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Overview

The Broken Ones: A Novel by Stephen M. Irwin

If the characters in this near-future fiction feel that everything has been turned upside down, they have some justification: On the day commemorated as "Gray Wednesday," the poles of the earth suddenly switched, leaving governments in disarray and economies reduced to rubble. Individuals now suffer from a more immediate problem: Each of them is now accompanied constantly by a ghost, invisible to all others. In this maelstrom of uncertainty, Australian detective Oscar Mariani searches for a serial killer who leaves on a mark of his grim reaper work on every victim. A novel hailed as "genre-bending and imaginative…part fantasy, part supernatural crime thriller"; now in trade paperback and NOOK Book.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780385534666
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 08/07/2012
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 368
Sales rank: 152,294
File size: 3 MB

About the Author

STEPHEN M. IRWIN lives in Brisbane, Australia, with his wife and children. He is the author of The Dead Path.

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The Broken Ones 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
StarSpun More than 1 year ago
Oscar Mariani is an investigator with the “Barelies”. Let me explain: the Nine-Ten Investigation Unit was created 3 years ago (after Gray Wendesday), and it sounded enough like “nineteen” that it became the Barely Legals, shortened to the “Barelies”. Oscar continually has to endure the indignity of being part of an investigation unit that isn’t taken seriously, and also the ghost of a little boy that’s been haunting him since Gray Wednesday. Gray Wednesday left the world in shambles and in its wake, also left everyone with a ghost of their own. Oscar and his partner Neve find the body of a young girl in the sewer system, laid open by an enormous industrial auger. The mutilation wasn’t enough to cover a symbol carved into the girl’s stomach. This case should have been passed to the Homicide unit, but Mariani decides to investigate it himself. Neve isn’t so enthusiastic, and isn’t afraid to show it. She soon puts in for a transfer, but it’s clear that she’s conflicted. As Oscar follows the clues, he begins to uncover something that can only be described as pure evil. At continuous risk of losing his job, the case will take him first to a home for disabled children, the Heights, a sparkling walled enclave where the elite dwell, and finally into an occult underground that will take him nearly beyond his emotional and physical endurance. To say that I loved this book would be an understatement. Oscar Mariani is my favorite kind of protagonist: wounded, deeply moral, and determined to see things put right. When Gray Wednesday hit, his ghost appeared in front of him while driving on a busy street, and in trying to avoid what he thought was a real person in front of him, he swerved to avoid him, and struck a young girl. The pain that he carries with him because of this, and its aftermath, is palpable on nearly every page. The author set his story against a future Australia that is broken, dark, and bereft of hope, to nearly all except for the very wealthy. Power is spotty, government support is very limited, and struggling to get by is an understatement. Amidst the ruin, Oscar is a beacon, whether he wants to be or not. His quest (and it is a quest) to see things right is fraught with danger and figuring out who can be trusted is no small task. A complicated relationship with his adoptive, ex-cop father is a fulcrum on which he swings, and we’re given small glimpses into that relationship throughout the story. The Broken Ones is not for the faint of heart, however. There’s nothing gratuitous here, but the author absolutely does not pull punches, and there were a few times that I had to look away and catch my breath. The language he uses is just beautiful, even when describing the most gruesome scenes: There is one particular scene in The Broken Ones that absolutely terrified me. I’m talking about “watching-the-scariest-movie” muscle clenching horror. I held my breath for two whole pages. It’s been a long time since a book has had that effect on me, and frankly, it was awesome. To pigeonhole The Broken Ones into one genre would be very inaccurate. It’s a combination of supernatural thriller, police procedural, horror, and dystopian…and it works. Oh boy, does it work! Stephen M. Irwin puts his characters through the emotional and physical ringers, and doesn’t spare his reader either. I felt wrung out when I finished this novel, but in the best way, the way you feel like when you’ve finished a wonderful book...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Telling of it. Should make it into a movie or series.