The Carpathian Assignment: The True History of the Apprehension and Death of Dracula Vlad Tepes, Count and Voivode of the Principality of Transylvania

The Carpathian Assignment: The True History of the Apprehension and Death of Dracula Vlad Tepes, Count and Voivode of the Principality of Transylvania

by Chip Wagar

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781495498909
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 05/28/2014
Pages: 326
Sales rank: 889,837
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.68(d)

About the Author

Chip Wagar is a practicing attorney in New Orleans with a degree in international affairs centered on Eastern Europe and the Balkans. The Carpathian Assignment is his second novel set in the period and location of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire.

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The Carpathian Assignment: The True History of the Apprehension and Death of Dracula Vlad Tepes, Count and Voivode of the Principality of Transylvani 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
gdona29 More than 1 year ago
Understandably likely to divide opinion as the work borrows (or 'channels' depending on how you wish to view it) so heavily in it's style and content from Bram stokers 1897 template creating "Dracula". If you can recover from that fact that this is not a reimagining but more a journey back through time to tap back in through homage to the style and texture of the original work, this book will deliver a slow burning but no less gripping read. Some daywalkers may label it a 'retread' or a recycled imitation but that the Dracula template has for a long time been a tool for writers and filmakers to make use of. Therefore why not go 'back to the future' as a way forward rather than offer up another teen vampire romance? Atmsopheric, skillfully and subtely underplayed in parts and with a bloody, climactic conclusion. Author achieves what you would believe he set out to do (not reinventing the wheel) and is best read and appreciated keeping that in mind.
Bloggabook More than 1 year ago
This is the best written, most researched book I have ever hated.  The writing is really superb. The flow and language evokes the original Stoker classic.  The effort that went into compiling the background information for this story must have been painstaking. The attention to detail really shows in the descriptions of the villages and cities.  Where this all goes wrong for me is in the story itself. This isn't even a reimagining of the original legend like so many other popular books are these days.  What drives this story are the lives of fringe characters that were never associated with the original. This comes across as pages that were too superfluous for the classic and were cut in editing the story down to its final size. There is no new information here. In fact, I'm not sure what this story really hopes to accomplish.  This is like an alternate camera angle that doesn't shine any new light on the outcome of the story.  It is a shame that there is so little to be had from the amount of effort that went into this work.