×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Chinese Face in Australia: Multi-generational Ethnicity among Australian-born Chinese
     

The Chinese Face in Australia: Multi-generational Ethnicity among Australian-born Chinese

by Lucille Lok-Sun Ngan, Chan Kwok-bun
 

See All Formats & Editions

They have been settled for three, four, five and even six generations and have strong national and cultural identities grounded in Australia. Yet Chineseness remains central to the identity of the Australian-born Chinese — whether they willingly choose to identify with it or it is imposed upon them by others. The Chinese Face in Australia explores how

Overview

They have been settled for three, four, five and even six generations and have strong national and cultural identities grounded in Australia. Yet Chineseness remains central to the identity of the Australian-born Chinese — whether they willingly choose to identify with it or it is imposed upon them by others. The Chinese Face in Australia explores how long-settled Australian-born Chinese (ABCs) perceive and perform ethnicity within the family, the ethnic community, Australian society, and the global Chinese diaspora. Using extensive interview transcripts and rich autobiographical and visual materials, the authors examine the social experiences of the ABC community in Australia, particularly in terms of the Chinese cultural discourse. This provocative volume:
• Explores the impact of racial concepts on the formation of hybrid identities throughout their life courses, complicating and placing burdens on the daily lives of long-settled ABCs.
• Describes how these social processes and practices have been shared for centuries by other Chinese diasporic communities across the world.
• Informs the discourse on the experience of Australia's other minority groups.
• Addresses global issues of race, ethnicity, culture, and immigration.
• Provides object lessons for other immigrant societies confronting difficult issues of race and identity

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

From the reviews:

“Ngan (Univ. of Hong Kong) and Chan (Hong Kong Baptist Univ.) skillfully engage the postmodernist elusiveness of race theory while contesting the essentialist assumptions that presuppose ethnicity and culture in this timely contribution to the complex project of examining the methodological and analytical strategies for understanding identity politics. … An important addition to migration studies and ethnic studies scholarship. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above.” (A. Cho, Choice, Vol. 50 (5), January, 2013)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781489986047
Publisher:
Springer New York
Publication date:
07/31/2014
Edition description:
2012
Pages:
220
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.02(d)

Meet the Author

Lucille Lok-Sun NGAN is Honorary Lecturer of Sociology, University of Hong Kong and University of Macau; and Affiliated Research Fellow, Department of Social Sciences, Hong Kong Institute of Education. She was born in Hong Kong and raised in Australia. After receiving her doctorate degree in sociology from the University of New South Wales, she moved to Hong Kong with her family. Her research focuses on migration, Chinese diaspora, transnationalism, ethnic and race relations, identities, life course, gender and family. Her recent publications include 'Decentered transnational linkages: Chinese Returned Migrants in Hong Kong', in Transnational Migration Identifications in Asia: Living Intersections, edited by C. Pluss and K. B. Chan (Springer, 2012); 'An Outsider is Always an Outsider: Migration, Social Policy and Social Exclusion in East Asia.' with K. W. Chan, Journal of Comparative Asian Development (forthcoming); 'Chineseness: The Influence of Family and Marriage on the Identity of Long-established Australian-born Chinese', in International Handbook of Chinese Families, edited by K. B. Chan (Springer 2012); 'Generational Identities Through Time: Memories and Homelands of the ABCs’, in At Home in the Chinese Diaspora: Memories, Identity and Belonging, edited by A. Davidson and K. E. Kuah-Pearce (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008, 74-93); and ‘Living In-between’, Chinese Southern Diaspora Studies Journal (Vol. 2 No.1, 2008, 127-135).

Chan Kwok-bun is Founder and Chairman, Chan Institute of Social Studies (CISS). He is former Chair Professor and Head of Department of Sociology, and Director of David C Lam Institute of East-West Studies,Hong Kong Baptist University. Also former Head of Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore. Author of 25 books and about 100 essays inChinese and English, Chan recently focusses on migration, identities, hybridity, transnationalism and cosmopolitanism, the family, and race and ethnic relations. Founded and edited Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, an official journal of the Hong Kong Sociological Association, of which he was President. Collects art and antiques, does public art exhibitions, and writes poetry. His Chan Institute has two arms: a think-tank of social studies and public policy, and an art gallery specializing in Southeast and Chinese art and antiques—all in an attempt to work with other like-minded people toward his goal of “Good Society, Good Life”.

Chan Kwok-bun is Founder and Chairman, Chan Institute of Social Studies (CISS). He is former Chair Professor and Head of Department of Sociology, and Director of David C Lam Institute of East-West Studies,Hong Kong Baptist University. Also former Head of Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore. Author of 25 books and about 100 essays inChinese and English, Chan recently focusses on migration, identities, hybridity, transnationalism and cosmopolitanism, the family, and race and ethnic relations. Founded and edited Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, an official journal of the Hong Kong Sociological Association, of which he was President. Collects art and antiques, does public art exhibitions, and writes poetry. His Chan Institute has two arms: a think-tank of social studies and public policy, and an art gallery specializing in Southeast and Chinese art and antiques—all in an attempt to work with other like-minded people toward his goal of “Good Society, Good Life”.

Chan Kwok-bun is Founder and Chairman, Chan Institute of Social Studies (CISS). He is former Chair Professor and Head of Department of Sociology, and Director of David C Lam Institute of East-West Studies,Hong Kong Baptist University. Also former Head of Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore. Author of 25 books and about 100 essays inChinese and English, Chan recently focusses on migration, identities, hybridity, transnationalism and cosmopolitanism, the family, and race and ethnic relations. Founded and edited Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, an official journal of the Hong Kong Sociological Association, of which he was President. Collects art and antiques, does public art exhibitions, and writes poetry. His Chan Institute has two arms: a think-tank of social studies and public policy, and an art gallery specializing in Southeast and Chinese art and antiques—all in an attempt to work with other like-minded people toward his goal of “Good Society, Good Life”.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews