The Confederacy's Secret Weapon: The Civil War Illustrations of Frank Vizetelly

The Confederacy's Secret Weapon: The Civil War Illustrations of Frank Vizetelly

by Douglas W. Bostick
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Overview

The Confederacy's Secret Weapon: The Civil War Illustrations of Frank Vizetelly by Douglas W. Bostick


Sent to the United States as a war correspondent for the Illustrated London News, Frank Vizetelly quickly found himself in hot water with the Federal secretary of war when his depictions of Bull Run hit the papers. He was forbidden access to the Union army, so he took up with the Confederates instead, covering the Civil War from Charleston to the Mississippi and north to Virginia, becoming a favorite among the soldiers and even, at times, acting as a spy. His articles and sketches shaped the views of the English regarding the war, creating support for the Southern cause throughout Great Britain. Join Civil War historian Douglas W. Bostick as he relates the many engagements and battles covered by Vizetelly, including Charleston, Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, the March on Richmond and the early Mississippi campaigns, all accompanied by the artist's engravings and reported in his own lively words. Vizetelly's remarkable story has never been properly told until now.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781596295926
Publisher: History Press, The
Publication date: 11/20/2009
Series: Civil War Sesquicentennial Series
Pages: 160
Sales rank: 1,249,146
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.40(d)

About the Author


Doug Bostick is a native of James Island and is an eighth-generation South Carolinian. He is a graduate of the College of Charleston and earned a master's degree from the University of South Carolina. Bostick is a former staff and faculty member of the University of South Carolina and the University of Maryland. He is the author of fifteen books, and his knowledge of history is enhanced by a raconteur's gift for storytelling.

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The Confederacy's Secret Weapon: The Civil War Illustrations of Frank Vizetelly 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
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James_Durney More than 1 year ago
Small books have a special set of delights unique to them. Unlike their huge detailed conspicuous footnoted brothers, another special set of delights, they are quick enjoyable reads. This book is one of the better small histories I have read. Frank Vizetelly is not a common Civil War name but his illustrations are instantly recognized. This book introduces the man behind these illustrations. At the same time, the reader gets a glimpse of 1860s journalism and the cutthroat competition between the illustrated weekly papers. Toss in a look at living in the Confederacy, problems in sending material to England and being a war correspondent to spice the story. The result is a quick, fun and informative read that will please Civil War readers, students of journalism and history buffs. The author has a clear narrative style that easily links Vizetelly's dispatches together. We get just enough of the author to place Vizetelly within the war and cover the problems he faces. However, Vizetelly's dispatches and illustrations tell the story. In 1860, four newspapers featured topical woodcut engravings. The Illustrated London News dispatched an experience war correspondent to cover the war in America. His reporting upset Washington and denied his accreditation. These circumstances caused him to cross into the Confederacy providing us with "pictures" of the Civil War from that viewpoint. He became a Southern supporter and at Chickamauga carried messages for Longstreet during the battle. Very well liked and trusted, he had access to the CSA high command. This extended to traveling with Jefferson Davis after the fall of Richmond and "loaning" him money to aid his escape. The best part of the book might be the woodcuts. This is the war in the South as seen by a sympathizer of their cause. They range from portraits of Lee, Jackson and Stuart to battlefields and slave churches. Highly detailed, they stopped my reading to look at them and view the war as he saw it.