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Confessions of St. Ace
     

The Confessions of St. Ace

by John Wesley Harding
 
Although the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is littered with bands who aspired to be the second-best Beatles, being the second-best Elvis Costello is not a particularly fruitful pursuit. Just ask John Wesley Harding. After spending most of the '90s crafting witty, catchy, but straightforward alterna-folk/rock, the British-born Harding (real name: Wesley Stace -- he nabbed

Overview

Although the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is littered with bands who aspired to be the second-best Beatles, being the second-best Elvis Costello is not a particularly fruitful pursuit. Just ask John Wesley Harding. After spending most of the '90s crafting witty, catchy, but straightforward alterna-folk/rock, the British-born Harding (real name: Wesley Stace -- he nabbed the John Wesley Harding tag from the 1967 Bob Dylan album) refreshingly mixed things up with 1997's Awake, a dreamy concept album fueled by hip-hop beats. On The Confessions of St. Ace, Harding moves his experimentation in a new direction: south. Recorded in Nashville, the album finds the Cambridge-educated Harding harmonizing with country boys like Jimmie Dale Gilmore and Steve Earle, who duets with Harding on the honky-tonk ballad "Our Lady of the Highways" -- sure to draw a chuckle from anybody who's ever driven north on Interstate 95. Country isn't Harding's only new seasoning; "Same Piece of Air" and "I'm Wrong About Everything" (from the High Fidelity soundtrack) are worthy derivatives of Muscle Shoals soul. Combined with the vaudevillian "Humble Bee," the torchy ballad "Too Much into Nothing" and the wink-wink power-pop love song noir "Goth Girl," they make for Harding's most versatile and memorable collection yet.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stacia Proefrock
John Wesley Harding has tried to shake comparisons to Elvis Costello for years, and this album, with its smooth yet acerbic vocals, won't do much to further his cause. However, it is one of his best in years and is filled with witty, thoughtful songwriting and polished instrumentation that works together to make a seamless album, engaging the listener. Best songs include "She's a Piece of Work" and "I'm Wrong About Everything."
Entertainment Weekly - Tony Scherman
Although Harding and his facile accompanists are almost too smooth for their own good, a brace of songs grab hold and don’t let go.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/29/2000
Label:
Hollywood Records
UPC:
0720616550323
catalogNumber:
165503

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

John Wesley Harding   Primary Artist,Guitar,Vocals,Pump Organ
Jimmie Dale Gilmore   Vocals
Steve Earle   Vocals
Scott McCaughey   Tambourine,Mellotron,sleigh bells
Eric Darken   Percussion
Kent Alphin   Vocals
David Angell   Violin
Steve Brewster   Drums
Gary Burnette   Guitar
John Catchings   Cello
David Davidson   Violin
Mark Ivey   Vocals
Duane Jarvis   Vocals
Michael Mellett   Vocals
Greg Morrow   Drums
Perkins   Pedal Steel Guitar
Chris Von Sneidern   Vocal Harmony,Guest Appearance
Kristin Wilkinson   Viola
Tim Lauer   Keyboards
Jeff Roach   Keyboards
Jennifer Kummer   French Horn
Georgia Middleman   Vocals
Mark Hill   Bass

Technical Credits

Joe Baldridge   Engineer
Gary Burnette   Producer
Kristin Wilkinson   Arranger
Rob Evans   Engineer
Dan Leffler   Engineer
Shawn McClean   Engineer
Martin Feveyear   Engineer
Jon Ervie   Engineer
Rob Seidenberg   Producer

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