The Doodle Revolution: Unlock the Power to Think Differently

The Doodle Revolution: Unlock the Power to Think Differently

by Sunni Brown
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Overview

The Doodle Revolution: Unlock the Power to Think Differently by Sunni Brown

A fearless guide to awakening your mind using simple visual language
 
What do Einstein, Edison, Richard Feynman, Henry Ford, and JFK have in common? Like virtually all heavy-hitting thinkers, they looked beyond just words and numbers to get intellectual and creative insights. They actively applied a deceptively simple tool to think both smarter and faster: the doodle. And so can the rest of us—zero artistic talent required.
 
Visual thinking expert Sunni Brown has created The Doodle Revolution as a kick-starter guide for igniting and applying simple visual language to any challenge. The instinctive and universal act of doodling need only be unleashed in order to innovate, solve problems, and elevate cognitive performance instantly.
 
With humor, wit, and a commitment to disrupting our perceptions of doodling, Brown teaches us how to:

  • Doodle any object, concept, or system imaginable.
  • Invent, innovate, and solve messy problems.
  • Transform text into a visual display that engages an audience.
  • Explain the relevance of visual literacy to leaders at work and at school.
 
Despite what our culture suggests, doodling and sketching are powerful tools and they are for everyone, not just artsy types. It’s time we recognize visual literacy as a fundamental requirement for the future.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781591845881
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 01/09/2014
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 1,345,252
Product dimensions: 8.38(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.88(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Sunni Brown was named by Fast Company as one of the 100 Most Creative People in Business and one of the 10 Most Creative People on Twitter. She is a consultant, speaker, coauthor of Gamestorming, and the leader of a global campaign for visual literacy.

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The Doodle Revolution: Unlock the Power to Think Differently 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
A_Sloan More than 1 year ago
Doodle free or die! Sunni Brown is leading a revolution that embraces doodling as one of the best enablers of productive thinking. This book was a must for me. I used to love doodling but somehow those doodles stopped, or got ugly. Did I fall into the trap of taking my life and my self too seriously? After looking into the book description I connected with the term “visual literacy” because of two friends that are teaching that in Boone, NC although I never quite understood how that was academic enough for graduate study. Oh, was I so wrong. With our world being as loaded with images as it is, it’s incredibly fascinating and useful to understand how we subconsciously understand and process this information. If harnessed, it’s incredibly useful to doodle to process dense information because it encourages the mind to discover different angles and hidden connections. Other points that I find fascinating are: - When doodling, you tap into *all four* learning modalities at the same time (visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and tactile) - By looking at the evolution of children’s drawing worldwide, she argues that doodling is native to our species - Her new definition of the doodle is “to make spontaneous marks to help yourself think.” Sunni Brown does an excellent job at promoting respect for the doodle, in both her TED talk and this wonderful book. I highly recommend learning more about this! I think other people who are looking for ways to use doodling in the workplace would like learning about the Synectics method for brainstorming with groups, which is described well in The Practice of Creativity.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago