The Doors of Perception: Includes Heaven and Hell

The Doors of Perception: Includes Heaven and Hell

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Overview

The Doors of Perception: Includes Heaven and Hell by Aldous Huxley

In 1952 Aldous Huxley became involved in the now legendary experiment to clinically detail the physiological and psycho-logical effects of the little known drug used by Mexican and Native American elders in religious practices. The drug was Peyote-now commonly know as mescalin.
By the standards of the time, Huxley was a hard working, respected, and reserved intellectual from a highly intelligent, well-know, and eccentric British family. By any standards, the results of the experiment were remarkable.
The Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hell detail the practic-alities of the experiment and give Huxley's vivid account of his im-mediate experience and the more prolonged effect upon his sub-sequent thinking and awareness.
At first, the reader is drawn in by the sheer naivety and tom-foolery of the proposal but is soon caught in a finely woven net by the juxtaposition of Huxley's formidable intellect, his remarkable ability to convey the experience in such acute and truthful detail, and his incredible modesty.
In 1922 Gertrude Stein famously wrote - A rose is a rose is a rose. In proving her right, Huxley also shows the deeper meaning be-hind the apparently simple verse and goes on to deliver such spec-tacular accounts of the most everyday objects that the reason for their repeated and continual renderings by all the major artists throughout history suddenly becomes quite clear. For the con-scious and willing reader - a trip to the Guggenheim, the Louvre or the Tate Modern will never be the same again.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781907590092
Publisher: Thinking Ink Limited
Publication date: 04/22/2011
Pages: 100
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.24(d)

About the Author

Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) was born in Surrey, England, and is the author of many critically acclaimed books of fiction and nonfiction, including Crome Yellow, The Doors of Perception, and Island.

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The Doors of Perception Includes Heaven and Hell (P.S. Series) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
Modern_Day_Philosopher More than 1 year ago
"There are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors of perception." (Aldous Huxley) The Doors of Perception was writing in the mid 50s by Aldous Huxley who is well known for the most popular work "A Brave New World". The Doors of Perception is actually a combination of two book one of which being "Heaven and Hell". Heaven and Hell is an eye opening book that explains the depth of our wanting or subconscious love for the astral world. It shows why we cause our selves to leave reality and how it effects the world around us. For centuries we have allowed ourselves in multiple ways to escape to our subconscious in view a world of beauty. From the John Lennon doing LSD to Siddhartha Gautama (Buddha) fasting, everyone within themselves has a love for the astral world. It is theorized that in the subconscious part of our mind, also known as antipodes, we see colors so vivid and in its purest form that the world itself seen through this part of the mind glows like gems from the real world. Think for a moment about how and why we love gems so much like rubies, sapphires, amethyst, and topaz. It may very well be that it reminds our antipodes of the astral world. Furthermore, people of different areas began to find out ways to trigger these so called "trips" to the other world. Some people like the Indians would fast for days alone in the woods until they saw a vision from there antipodes. Artwork itself began to evolve around humanities love to this cerebral world. Stained glass was even put into churches in the 12 century to induce such thoughts. It effects everything we do in one way or another. Is a love for the out of body experience such a bad thing or is it just natural? This book is a highly intelligent read which would be best suited for anyone interested in our love for drugs and out of body experiences. I would give in an 8 out of 10 since it was such an interesting read, but got hard to follow at parts.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Heaven and Hell by Aldous Huxley: Written in 1954, Aldous Huxley’s Heaven and Hell has remained what I deem to be a controversial novel for now over 60 years. Comparable to Huxley’s own mescaline experiences documented in The Doors of Perception, Heaven and Hell is an informative essay that tells the reader, from quite an unbiased perspective, everything they need to know to have a complete basic knowledge of alternate states of consciousness. Huxley’s narratives on alternate states of consciousness in this book include not only those that are identified with psychedelic drugs, but also those that go along with natural body processes, or even otherwise average objects, such as precious stones and jewels, and the place they stand regarding these transendental experiences. Unlike other literature on the subject, especially from this time period of the mid-20th century Huxley’s novel sheds a new light on a newly-revitalized concept in the post-WWII western world. Huxley introduces this concept in its barest form, explaining in an easily digested tone to even the most reluctant of readers, how commonplace the idea of changing consciousness actually is—from sleep to the ingestion of substances such as coffee and cigarettes. Making acute reference to the archaic quality of the human quest to change their mode of consciousness—whether it be from the ingestion of plant compounds such is the custom in pre-Colombian cultures worldwide—or exploration of other realms through the alteration of the state of the mind along with that of the physical body. As he explains these procedures, Huxley not only encompasses the essence of these esoteric processes from a varied perspective, he reverts back to these concepts the respect and ardent fervor that has been lost to them through the trials of modern society. Huxley leads the reader through a regression of thinking, introducing and reintroducing concepts and beliefs that reoccur through the course of intellectual evolution. In this manner Huxley insinuates to the reader in multiple instances where upon that road we veered off course, resulting in the biased, corrupt, and naïve subjectivity that draws the line between what is and what is not socially acceptable—not only in the 1950s, but today as well. As long as the principles in Huxley’s novel remain repressed and unevaluated as serious additions to the broad cultural definitions of altered states of consciousness, the book itself will remain a vital standard of academia for all those interested in furthering their knowledge not only of the possibilities and limits of the human mind, but those looking to find a glimpse into the human condition that leaves our society in its ceaseless succession of decreasing morals and unfluctuating cause and effect.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is totally mind-blowing and gives good insight not just into the use of mescaline but into life itself.
Anonymous 4 months ago
If I have the opportunity to try mescaline or LSD, I will certainly decline. I came to this book with more than an open mind, I came with great respect for the author; hoping for some profound insight into the psychedelic experience. Two possibilities !seem likely as to the result. Either the experience really is dull and unremarkable, or it so closely resembles my own ordinary internal experiences that I just don't see what point there was to writing this. So, go ahead and read this book as your results may well be different!
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Good book for anyone who is curious about the interminable potential of the brain/mind, and ways/methods of accessing the many minds eyes.
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