×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The economic life of a Bengal district; a study
     

The economic life of a Bengal district; a study

by James Charles Jack
 
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.

Overview

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940018549710
Publisher:
Oxford : The Clarendon press
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
255 KB

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III INCOME AND ECONOMIC CONDITION OF THE PEOPLE AS REVEALED BY THE STATISTICS I Have gone into the expenditure of an average family in this detail because a thorough understanding of the social habits and method of life of the people is essential before the statistics and the classifications which were the result of the economic investigations made in Faridpur can be understood. The object of these investigations was first to find out the condition of the family by examining the condition of the homestead and its inmates and then to determine the income of the family partly by cross-examination of the adults and partly by computation from the amount of land which each cultivator's family possessed and the selling value of the crop which it could produce. The investigation was carried out by men (Bengalis who were mostly university graduates) who had already been several months in the locality, had made a survey field by field of the village and had prepared a paper describing the fields, soil, area, rent and rights for every tenancy belonging to every cultivator. They therefore knew much about the productive capacity of the soil and much about the habits of the villagers. They were directed to pay more attention to what they saw than to what they heard, and only after they had seen the condition of the family by a visit to its homestead to enquire into its resources, to tabulate its income and to enter its classification. In classification four standards were adopted : ' comfort ', which implied a condition in which the material necessities of life could be fully satisfied ; ' indigence ', which implied a condition in which the family had just sufficient to keep itselfalive and no more; and two classes intermediate between these extremes, one labelled ' below com...

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews