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The Encyclopedia of Preserved People: Pickled, Frozen, and Mummified Corpses from Around the World
     

The Encyclopedia of Preserved People: Pickled, Frozen, and Mummified Corpses from Around the World

by Natalie Jane Prior
 

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Preserved people can tell us things that skeletons can't-hairstyles and tattoos can tell us what people looked like, full stomachs can tell us what thev ate, and autopsies can reveal what diseases they suffered.

With sections on Egyptian mummies, bog bodies, Einstein's brain, and the Ice Man, The Encyclopedia of Preserved People provides a fascinating look at

Overview

Preserved people can tell us things that skeletons can't-hairstyles and tattoos can tell us what people looked like, full stomachs can tell us what thev ate, and autopsies can reveal what diseases they suffered.

With sections on Egyptian mummies, bog bodies, Einstein's brain, and the Ice Man, The Encyclopedia of Preserved People provides a fascinating look at those men, women, and children whose bodies have been preserved until the present day. It proves that history is not about dull dates, but about people who laughed, cried, ate, and worked, just like us-yet who were also incredibly different. It includes an index and a bibliography and is illustrated by over 30 full-color photographs.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
What do tattoos, stomach contents, and burial rituals tell us about long-dead bodies that are discovered today? Examination of these bodies reveals scientifically significant discoveries important to archaeologists, historians, doctors, and other experts. Bog dogs, ice men, mummies, shrunken heads...part one of this book circles the globe discussing different ways of preserving bodies. Information about natron, formaldehyde, and other methods of preservation is intermingled with bits of trivia. Many historic figures make appearances in addition to the expected Tutankhamen (e.g., Einstein, Lenin, Nelson, Napoleon). Part two, "Techniques, Tools, and Topics," delivers short discussions about autopsies, CAT scans, DNA testing, mammoths, peat bogs, x-rays, and more. Both sections are crossed-referenced for easy fact-finding. Some of the photos fall in the gruesome category but are scientifically interesting showing the extent of preservation or decay. Flyleaves back and front carry world maps identifying each of the geographic areas mentioned. An index, a glossary, and additional references are contained in the last of the 64 pages. 2002, Crown Publishers,
— Chris Gill
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-This compendium is organized geographically and arranged alphabetically. The catalog of the macabre includes Africa (ancient Egyptians); Australasia, Asia, and the Pacific (e.g., Lady Dai and George Mallory); Europe (such as Iron Age bog bodies and Lenin); North America (Einstein's brain and the ill-fated Franklin expedition); and South America (Juanita the Ice Lady and Eva Peron). A final chapter lists techniques (such as DNA testing), tools (CAT scans), and topics (ancient diseases). A number of see-also references appear throughout. Small black-and-white and full-color photos, period engravings, and modern watercolors provide a measure of "ickiness" that should satisfy modestly demanding ghouls. The text is conversational in tone, and gleefully chatty when exploring such juicy topics as "Exploding Kings and Queens," but most entries are quite short. The endpapers provide global location maps for the corpses. Strangely missing from the list for further reading are such eloquent gems as James M. Deem's Bodies from the Bog (Houghton, 1998), Johan Reinhard's Discovering the Inca Ice Maiden (National Geographic, 1998), Christopher Sloan's Bury the Dead (National Geographic, 2002), and Donna M. Jackson's The Bone Detectives (Little, Brown, 1996). An attention-grabbing and browsable read.-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Not so much a research tool as a compelling browsing item, this crowd-pleasing Aussie import features articles, arranged in several alphabetically arranged topics, on famous mummies ancient and modern. It includes techniques of bodily preservation and of its modern study, plus such sidelights as head-shrinking procedures, the ill-fated Franklin Expedition that disappeared into northern Canada in the mid-19th-century, and "Exploding Kings and Queens." The author relates her tales with "eeewww"-inspiring relish: as Lord Nelson's body was preserved in a cask of spirits during its final voyage back to England, "ever since, British sailors have called a drink of rum 'tapping the admiral.' " And after murderer William Corder was hanged, "the local hospital got his skeleton, as well as his brain in a bottle, and a leather shop in London got his scalp and one of his ears. Finally, Corder's skin was tanned like cow-hide and used to bind a book telling the story of his crime." Prior gathers examples from every continent except Antarctica, and closes with a child-friendly bibliography for readers who must, just must, know more. Though the illustrations are a disappointing scatter of small photos, filler, and artists' sketches, this is bound to be a popular choice for fans of the icky as well as budding forensic scientists. (index, glossary, photo credits) (Nonfiction. 9-11)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375822872
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
03/11/2003
Edition description:
1ST CROWN
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
7.78(w) x 10.27(h) x 0.46(d)
Age Range:
7 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Natalie Jane Prior has published several award-winning books for young readers in Australia including fiction, nonfiction, and picture books. Before dedicating herself fulltime to writing, she was a librarian.

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