The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations?

The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations?

by Ian Bremmer
3.4 27
ISBN-10:
1591843014
ISBN-13:
9781591843016
Pub. Date:
05/13/2010
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
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Overview

The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations?

A number of authoritarian governments, drawn to the economic power of capitalism but wary of uncontrolled free markets, have invented something new: state capitalism. In this system, governments use markets to create wealth that can be directed as political officials see fit. As an expert on the intersection between economics and politics, Ian Bremmer is uniquely qualified to illustrate the rise of state capitalism and its long-term threat to the global economy. The main characters in this story are the men who rule China, Russia, and the Arab monarchies of the Persian Gulf, but their successes are attracting imitators across much of the developing world. This guide to the next big trend includes useful insights for investors, business leaders, policymakers, and anyone else who wants to understand major emerging changes in international politics and the global economy.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781591843016
Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date: 05/13/2010
Pages: 240
Product dimensions: 9.30(w) x 6.34(h) x 0.93(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

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The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations? 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
Mark-in-Arlington More than 1 year ago
This book carefully describes the rise, influence, and possible eventual dire consequences arising from the activities of the many government-controlled business enterprises being operated around the world for the benefit of the politicians in charge. The problems encountered by free-market publicly-owned corporations, when they compete with these government-controlled businesses, are described and analyzed. And the author provides some ideas as to what can be done to mitigate some of the bad things that are happening to restrict access to markets, labor, and products. In many ways, this book reminds me of political-economic textbooks I read in school, but it covers capitalism and markets from a fresh, current events viewpoint. I read the book because I wanted to learn more about how these state-controlled companies are being manipulated for political purposes. I learned a lot that helpe me understand more about what is really going on in the world.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
RolfDobelli More than 1 year ago
No truce appears on the horizon in the battle between government control and free markets, a conflict that has intensified in the aftermath of the 2008-2009 recession. Political strategist Ian Bremmer examines the differing models of "state capitalism" that have gained ground in emerging economies around the world. Using varying levels of political control, countries such as China, Russia and Saudi Arabia are adapting the capitalist scenario to their particular situations and needs, thereby presenting obstacles to a fair fight with Western businesses. While decrying the unfair advantage governments bring to successful emerging economies, Bremmer concedes that free markets alone can't solve all society's issues, and he advocates for "better government, not less government." getAbstract recommends this thorough, cogent study to global business executives looking to understand and compete in state-capitalist countries.
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