The Epic Crush of Genie Lo

The Epic Crush of Genie Lo

by F. C. Yee

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Overview

The Epic Crush of Genie Lo by F. C. Yee


Genie Lo is one among droves of Ivy-hopeful overachievers in her sleepy Bay Area suburb. When she’s not crushing it at volleyball, Genie is typically working on how to crack the elusive Harvard entry code. But when her hometown comes under siege from hellspawn straight out of Chinese folklore, her priorities are dramatically rearranged. Enter Quentin Sun, a mysterious new kid who becomes Genie’s guide to battling demons. While Genie knows Quentin only as an attractive transfer student, in another reality he is Sun Wukong, the mythological Monkey King incarnate. Suddenly, acing the SATs is the least of Genie’s worries.

This epic debut draws from Chinese mythology, features a larger-than-life heroine, and perfectly balances the realities of Genie’s grounded Bay Area life with the absurd supernatural world she finds herself commanding.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781419725487
Publisher: Amulet Books
Publication date: 08/08/2017
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 296,885
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.30(d)
Age Range: 13 - 17 Years

About the Author


F. C. Yee grew up in New Jersey and went to school in New England. His first book with Abrams, The Epic Crush of Genie Lo, released in 2017 to critical acclaim and four starred reviews. He currently lives and writes in Denver, Colorado.

Customer Reviews

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The Epic Crush of Genie Lo 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Anonymous 12 months ago
Got it on a whim and wow I finished reading in less than a day. Kept randomly grinning at work. Gonna buy a handful of copies and gifting them to.my cousins. Bye!
Anonymous 11 months ago
This was great clean read! I liked how it taught folklore without being boring or preachy. The banter and the action was good without being excessive. I look forward to the book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
YAS. YAAAAS. I am always on the lookout for Asian, specifically East Asian, representation in YA. And boy did this represent. Accurate Asian American culture for the winnnn. This book was from the POV of an actual Asian character by an actual Asian guy written in a very relatable voice that displayed the unique fusion (exhibited currently by many teenagers and twenties people) of modern language and slang, along with nerdy big words and articulate, well-informed statements that I felt like I was reading about someone whom I might actually interact with on Twitter. It was relevant. It wasn't outdated. When I read this book, I felt like someone GOT the culture and that it wasn't someone who was trying to hard that actually didn't get it. I was also really excited to see the legend of the Monkey King incorporated into the story, and in fact being the backbone of it. A big reason for my excitement was because, just recently, I learned for the first time about the Monkey King through the graphic novel American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang. This folklore was something that I missed out on almost completely when I was a kid for a few different reasons. One being my mom is nothing if not practical and no-nonsense and story-telling is not her forte (or one she wants to be her forte really). Two, she really has horrible memory for those things. Anyway, it was a gap that sorely needed filling and it was in this book in a very creative way. The use of Chinese throughout the book was also so cool to read, because any time I read them I'm instantly transported to a time and feeling of my own home. I'm by no means bilingual, but I do live in a household where "Ma, ni ke bu keyi get the Sriracha sauce?" is a weird/cool Chinese/English mesh that happens. It was a new (amazing) experience to see that occur very similarly in The Epic Crush. Lastly, the characters themselves were very well-written. The banter between Genie and Quentin was so cute and engaging. The dialogue was lively, never boring. The new Chinese gods and goddesses brought such a fresh new twist to the normal gods and goddesses game. It was, I have to say again, AMAZING. 10/10 (or 5/5 as the Goodreads scale goes). The twists and turns of the plot, along with the new cultural elements and genuine, loveable characters made an amazing YA novel. (Besides, who wouldn't want to read about the awkward attempts of a monkey king slash teenage boy, who is way to good looking for his own good, at hiding his monkey tail? ✋)
Rebecca Petruck More than 1 year ago
The blend of ancient Chinese tales with modern California totally works. Genie kicks butt (literally and figuratively), and I so appreciate how the story stays focused on the action and keeps the romancing to a pleasant minimum. Genie may have personal demons, but that doesn't get in the way of fighting escaped demons. May the Madame Divine Guardian be ever vigilant!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was surprised to find out this was a debut novel for the author. It was well-written, action-packed, and also hilarious. Also, the characters are are very believable and I can empathize with most of them. I can't seem to find the words to describe how much I recommend this book, but I really think it's a must-read for any and all fans of fantasy. Genie's strength in the face of her challenges, her relationships with the other characters, and the Chinese folklore combine to make a highly enjoyable read for all ages (there is a tiny bit of swearing though)
Morgan_S_M More than 1 year ago
This was awesome!!!! I’m so glad my friends suggested it as a buddy read or I probably wouldn’t have picked it up for awhile (that’s how TBRs go, or is that just me? Haha). It was SO funny and the story & mythology was unique and action packed. It also felt like a true YA setting- school was important and didn’t disappear from the storyline the more that Genie’s powers developed. Same with her parents; they were important to her growth and the overall plot. Genie was also allowed to be a real teenage girl- she was angry and confused, with lots of emotion and pressure-not perfect by any means- but she was still a good person trying to do right by everyone. I loved her. Quentin annoyed me at first but quickly grew on me; he was condescending but patient, and very mischievous. I absolutely loved his relationship with Genie in all its forms and how they were forced to work together to succeed. And talk about a slow burn hate-to-love romance, my favorite kind! I could see this as a really great monster-of-the-week type tv show; the Chinese mythology was rich and interesting and I’m definitely looking forward to the sequel! I’d highly recommend this to fantasy and contemporary fans alike. There’s something for everyone.
AsDreamsAreMade More than 1 year ago
So I feel like I’m in the minority with this one, but I just didn’t like it. Genie Lo’s biggest goal is simply to get the best grades possible and go to an Ivy League school–far away from home.  That all changes when she meets Quentin Sun–an infuriatingly handsome and equally annoying boy who also claims to be the Monkey King.  However, when demon spawn attack her and Quentin in broad daylight, Genie realizes Quentin might actually be telling the truth.  Now, they’re on a mission to rid the Bay Area of all the escaped demons from hell.  All while keeping her straight A average.  No sweat. I was actually really excited about this book when I got it at BEA. However, when I actually started reading it I just could not get into it.  And I tried. Believe me, I tried.  I almost didn’t finish it.  Here was the major issue I had with it. It was very elementary.  I know they’re billing it as a YA book (I even double checked), but the style and language read more like a middle grade novel.  The problems were very heightened, but they felt like they came out of nowhere.  When they did occur, it felt superficial because of the writing style.  I felt as if the author was trying to be humorous in the descriptions, but to me it just came off as unbelievable. There were a few humorous moments, but they were far and few in-between for me.  Maybe it just wasn’t my type of humor? I know a LOT of people found this book to be really funny, but I feel like I missed the memo on that.  I did enjoy the delving into Chinese culture and history.  There’s not a lot of it in YA literature and I really loved learning more about it.  In fact, I researched more about the Monkey King because as mythical character he intrigued me (so there’s that). The characters didn’t really do it for me either.  Genie is constantly drooling over Quentin, but it just didn’t seem very genuine.  She was probably the most interesting character, but I wish they had delved more into her backstory.  They might be saving this for more installments (based on the ending), but I think it would have served the story a little better to have some more character development, especially with the secondary characters.  They were almost throwaways in this. I could be wrong and I’m the only fluke reader to feel this way (according to a lot of other bloggers’ reviews I am), but judge for yourself.  If you’re looking for a YA novel that’s a bit more silly and reads more like a middle grade one, than this is your book.  I was just expecting a bit more.
BlotsofInk More than 1 year ago
So… I loved this book. Basically, before I read this book I heard about it from bookish Twitter. And of course, hearing that it was Asian YA, I WAS INTERESTED. (I have a slight obsession with Asian YA.) And of course, all of the goodreads reviews were raving about this book. Because it’s a great book. Genie is a fierce character that I love and honestly, I would be honored to be friends with her and Yunie if they were real people. There’s also some Chinese used in this book, which I loved, and it’s easy enough so that if you don’t speak Chinese you get the gist of what they’re talking about. She PUNCHES Quentin when they meet. She is SUCH an angry asian. I WANT TO MEET HER. Except I don’t want her to punch me. Genie’s relationship with her friend, Yunie, was so sweet and I love the all-asian cast. Yunie is mischievous and constantly loves “trolling” Genie at many turns, and it was just so relatable and I love their friendship. Everything is honestly so funny and I don’t think I’ve laughed as many times reading this book as any other. Genie’s voice is already incredibly easy and fun to read and conversational, especially since she uses modern language, which I absolutely loved. It helped me to really sink into this world and be more drawn into the experience. The tagline of this book is “A demon invasion is no excuse for bad grades,” and I love it! Besides the mythological aspect of this book, Genie has to focus on schoolwork and getting into a college, which is something that IS pushed upon in many Asian families. Quentin, the male lead, was so incredibly cute. He’s short, and his relationship with Genie was maddeningly adorable. He’s great with kids, and acts so goofy sometimes. The magical aspect of this world was also incredibly easy to understand. It incorporates Chinese mythology- specifically the legend of Sun Wukong, the Monkey King, and while I was reading about it, in my mind I was going- I KNOW THAT! Seriously, the next morning, I started asking my mom about Sun Wukong, and her response was “Of course I know that!” The myth just brought me a sense of familiarity that I am so happy about. See, during my childhood, I was watching the Monkey King tv shows. Other people were watching Dora or Sesame Street, but I was watching old Chinese television shows. The incorporation of Genie into that story was also interesting as well. I’m not going to mention Genie’s role in the legend, because that’s kind of spoiler-y, but it works. It works in a way that I would have never thought of. As for the romance. If you look at the legend, it seems so weird, but again, this book pulled it off. Quentin and Genie are basically the ultimate duo and they’re so cute together! Quentin is short and Genie is a tall girl, and you almost never see that in books.
BlotsofInk More than 1 year ago
So… I loved this book. Basically, before I read this book I heard about it from bookish Twitter. And of course, hearing that it was Asian YA, I WAS INTERESTED. (I have a slight obsession with Asian YA.) And of course, all of the goodreads reviews were raving about this book. Because it’s a great book. Genie is a fierce character that I love and honestly, I would be honored to be friends with her and Yunie if they were real people. There’s also some Chinese used in this book, which I loved, and it’s easy enough so that if you don’t speak Chinese you get the gist of what they’re talking about. She PUNCHES Quentin when they meet. She is SUCH an angry asian. I WANT TO MEET HER. Except I don’t want her to punch me. Genie’s relationship with her friend, Yunie, was so sweet and I love the all-asian cast. Yunie is mischievous and constantly loves “trolling” Genie at many turns, and it was just so relatable and I love their friendship. Everything is honestly so funny and I don’t think I’ve laughed as many times reading this book as any other. Genie’s voice is already incredibly easy and fun to read and conversational, especially since she uses modern language, which I absolutely loved. It helped me to really sink into this world and be more drawn into the experience. The tagline of this book is “A demon invasion is no excuse for bad grades,” and I love it! Besides the mythological aspect of this book, Genie has to focus on schoolwork and getting into a college, which is something that IS pushed upon in many Asian families. Quentin, the male lead, was so incredibly cute. He’s short, and his relationship with Genie was maddeningly adorable. He’s great with kids, and acts so goofy sometimes. The magical aspect of this world was also incredibly easy to understand. It incorporates Chinese mythology- specifically the legend of Sun Wukong, the Monkey King, and while I was reading about it, in my mind I was going- I KNOW THAT! Seriously, the next morning, I started asking my mom about Sun Wukong, and her response was “Of course I know that!” The myth just brought me a sense of familiarity that I am so happy about. See, during my childhood, I was watching the Monkey King tv shows. Other people were watching Dora or Sesame Street, but I was watching old Chinese television shows. The incorporation of Genie into that story was also interesting as well. I’m not going to mention Genie’s role in the legend, because that’s kind of spoiler-y, but it works. It works in a way that I would have never thought of. As for the romance. If you look at the legend, it seems so weird, but again, this book pulled it off. Quentin and Genie are basically the ultimate duo and they’re so cute together! Quentin is short and Genie is a tall girl, and you almost never see that in books.
NovelKnight More than 1 year ago
I knew this book would be great. I just had this innate feeling that this book would rocket up my list of best reads of the year (so far, of course). And it did. If you buy one book this year, let it be The Epic Crush of Genie Lo. With a diverse cast, a world both unlike anything I’ve read but also made highly accessible, and a story that had me tearing through the pages, I devoured this book much like a yaoguai would a human. For starters, Genie is Chinese American. I’m not, so I can’t speak to the rep of this book but I’ll say that I think Yee addressed stereotypes of Asian-American people that I’ve heard over the years and instead of enforcing them, gave a more realistic view to this culture subset. There were differences in the way that Genie and her mom interacted, and with some of the comments Genie made about the world, that differed from my home life and that of others I know and I liked seeing a new side of the world. My own background has been relatively sheltered and whitewashed because of where I live, and I haven’t had the chance to expand beyond that but I think this book was definitely a step in the right direction, and I encourage everyone to read it for that experience alone because there’s a lot we can learn from fiction beyond how to defeat demons. Then there’s the mythology woven into the world. I love mythology, especially from cultures that aren’t as prevalent (Greek mythology is great, y’all, but let’s change it up). This book focuses on Ancient Chinese folklore and brings those stories to life through the characters (quite literally). I think the way Yee presented the tales — not as a wise storyteller trying to impart wisdom, but as a teenager making sense of the stories — really worked both to show Genie’s character as well as make a likely unfamiliar topic accessible to a lot of readers. Genie has become one of my favorite YA heroines. She’s got such much going on in her life, it’s a wonder she manages it all and successfully at that. There was just the right balance here of fantastical demon hunting and the pressures of school (getting good grades, getting into a good college, not disappointing your parents, all the things that go with being a teen). She’s a fluid character in that she felt real, as though this is someone I might run into on the street but who could also smash a god into the ground. She’s down-to-earth and takes each situation in stride. This is the kind of heroine I want teens to read about, the kind of character that every reader can find a piece of themselves in. Not that the other characters were slouches. Quentin cracked me up, partially because the two of them together reminded me way too much of InuYasha and Kagome from the anime InuYasha (and yes, I understand the cultural differences between this book and the show, I am comparing the characters and the story itself in this case). Honestly, the comparisons were so prominent I could write a whole post about them on their own (and I might). He sees something in Genie that she hasn’t seen herself yet and watching their friendship grow was a great display of how people feed off each other. They both learned something in the process of the grand adventure. A smaller note but I loved the twist on Genie’s identity. It wasn’t what I was expecting at all but added yet another interesting element to this book. Before I start rambling too much more, let me just say that The Epic Crush of Genie Lo was one of the most unique and entertaining