The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language

The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language

by Mark Forsyth
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Overview

The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language by Mark Forsyth

Do you know why…

…a mortgage is literally a death pledge? …why guns have girls’ names? …why salt is related to soldier?

You’re about to find out…

The Etymologicon (e-t?-‘mä-lä-ji-kän) is:
*Witty (wi-te\): Full of clever humor

*Erudite (er-?-dit): Showing knowledge

*Ribald (ri-b?ld): Crude, offensive

The Etymologicon is a completely unauthorized guide to the strange underpinnings of the English language. It explains: how you get from “gruntled” to “disgruntled”; why you are absolutely right to believe that your meager salary barely covers “money for salt”; how the biggest chain of coffee shops in the world (hint: Seattle) connects to whaling in Nantucket; and what precisely the Rolling Stones have to do with gardening.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780425260791
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/02/2012
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 205,639
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Mark Forsyth is a writer, journalist, proofreader, ghostwriter, and pedant. He was given a copy of the Oxford English Dictionary as a christening present and has never looked back. He is the creator of The Inky Fool, a blog about words, phrases, grammar, rhetoric, and prose.

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The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
mrwasson1 More than 1 year ago
I would love to see this writer serialize a column that follows this book's path: start with a word and move forward through connections to history and culture and have each column be able to stand alone, but also connect cleanly to the column that preceded and follows. If you know people who enjoy language, consider this as a possible gift. The structure is entertaining as the writer takes us from word to word with smooth connections that startle. This book reignited my curiosity at the origins of words.