The Eye of Kuruman

The Eye of Kuruman

by Ian M. Evans

Paperback

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Overview

Ever since her grandfather told her stories about the famous David Livingstone, Alex Gordon has been fascinated by Africa. When offered the opportunity to work there as a public health nurse, Alex is excited. But bringing Western maternity medicine to rural Botswana and South Africa proves complicated. Alex faces unanticipated challenges: personal rivalries, water shortages, resistance, and the hidden toll of historic injustices.

In her resolve to promote culturally sensitive healthcare programs, Alex is kept emotionally buoyed by the affection of two very different men - Johan, a Dutch doctor recovering from the stress of an East African pandemic, and Fin, a black consultant with a doctorate in organizational psychology.

Wavering between such wonderful romantic and professional options, Alex must eventually decide on her future. What will her heart tell her matters the most?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781784653248
Publisher: Vanguard Press
Publication date: 09/28/2017
Pages: 378
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

Ian M. Evans is a British-born clinical psychologist who grew up South Africa. After completing a doctorate at King's College, London, his academic career has taken him to universities in Hawaii, New York, and New Zealand. A Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand, his research and practice focused on emotional and family challenges for young people with disabilities. Ian lives with his wife in Honolulu, where their children, grandchildren, and friends love to visit. This is his second novel (following Forgive Me My Trespasses, Archway, 2015).

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The Eye of Kuruman 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Eye of Kuruman, by Ian M. Evans, invites the reader on a journey from Central New York to southern Africa, from youthful innocence to adulthood, and from cultural naivety to beginning sophistication. It’s a journey worth undertaking. Familiar places in Central New York charm the traveler with comfortable trips, knowing the directions and distances and essential features of the landscape and its institutions. But, soon it is travel abroad to new places and unfamiliar geographies that the reader must go, at once creating uncertainties and educating about these environs. We want to see a map to find out where we have gone, how far it is from what we are familiar with. How appropriate it is that, entering this new terrain, the central character in the book, Alex, begins to leave behind her youthful accomplishments and limits in order to explore her young adult life and its prospects and challenges. She is unsure of herself, but she is determined and capable. In her nursing and public health profession, in her role as an attractive and sexually eager adult, and in her status as a young white woman in a racially and culturally different world, she discovers much about the work she has undertaken, about herself and her loves, and about the different world that she has begun to map with some success. The journey, which Alex and her intimate mates – Johan and Fin – undertake, however, also brings along the reader-traveler in exploring the issues of cultural hegemony, the relationships between traditional knowledge and science, and the acts of power and resistance in human interactions. It is this last aspect of the journey that presents the reader-traveler with the greatest challenge: Stepping from what is familiar and assumed to newer places, newer understandings, newer intellectual landmarks. While, along with Alex, Johan, and Fin, we may not quite locate ourselves in this new space, we can’t help but draw our maps of these territories a bit clearer. The Eye of Kuruman invites us to come along on this journey, and then shows us the way.