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The Four Stages of Highly Effective Crisis Management: How to Manage the Media in the Digital Age
     

The Four Stages of Highly Effective Crisis Management: How to Manage the Media in the Digital Age

by Jane Jordan-Meier
 

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ISBN-10: 1439853738

ISBN-13: 9781439853733

Pub. Date: 03/18/2011

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

From the Japanese tsunami and the Egyptian revolution to the Haitian earthquake and the Australian floods, social media has proven its power to unite, coalesce, support, champion, and save lives. Presenting cutting-edge media communication solutions, The Four Stages of Highly Effective Crisis Management explains how to choose the appropriate language and

Overview

From the Japanese tsunami and the Egyptian revolution to the Haitian earthquake and the Australian floods, social media has proven its power to unite, coalesce, support, champion, and save lives. Presenting cutting-edge media communication solutions, The Four Stages of Highly Effective Crisis Management explains how to choose the appropriate language and media outlet to properly convey your message during and after a crisis.

Unveiling the secrets of how to manage the media in a crisis, the book examines how rapidly evolving social media and Web 2.0 technologies have changed the crisis management landscape. It illustrates the four distinct stages of media reporting during a crisis and details the information that must be provided. The author provides readers with a wealth of helpful tips and tools—including guidelines, checklists, and case studies that illustrate best practices in crisis media management. Divided into five sections, the book:

  • Examines how the kingdom of news has changed and considers the new hybrid model that is emerging
  • Identifies the four distinct stages in which both old and new media report a crisis
  • Addresses the use of spokespeople according to the four stages, as well as when to use the chief executive officer
  • Discusses media interviews, including how to handle news conferences, bloggers, and the importance of media training
  • Considers the communication aspects of crisis management—including how to harness the power of Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Digg, Wikipedia, Flickr, and social media releases

The book’s resource-rich appendices include a checklist for briefing a spokesperson, sample media release, a step-by-step flowchart for creating a crisis communication plan, and social media policy guidelines. Complete with a detailed guide on what tools to use and when to use them, this book provides the techniques and understanding required to communicate effectively and avoid any potential bad press and embarrassment that could result from information mismanagement.

Jane Jordan-Meier was interviewed about leadership in a crisis and the stages of a crisis in the wake of the Murdoch phone-hacking scandal. She also discusses crisis management planning in The Sydney Morning Herald and in Daily Ovation. She was interviewed in August 2011 by Globe and Mail.

Discover more about the book, including a video of the author explaining how to turn media questions into gold and visit smallbusinessadvocate.com for a series of recent interviews.

Jane Jordan-Meier appeared in a video interview with Crisis Manager Melissa Agnes on July 3, 2012.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781439853733
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
03/18/2011
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
910,578
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.90(d)

Table of Contents

Section I Media, Crisis, and New Reporting Tools
What Is a Crisis?
Unfolding Crisis
Crisis is triggered
A Crisis Stops the Show
Case in Point: Virginia Tech
The Role of Media in a Crisis
Social, Interactive, and Everywhere All the Time
Today’s News from Multiple Platforms
Old Media Play a Role in the Social Media Revolution: Social or Leave
Power to the People: The Rise of Hyperlocal News
Mainstream Media Are Still a Factor
Social Media’s Role in Crisis
Media Ethics? What Drives Traditional Media Behavior
Twitter: Is It a Fad or the "8 Bazillion Pound Gorilla"?
Overview
Background
Pointless Babble: A Critic’s Take
Saving Lives, Saving Reputations
Breaking News: Twitter and the Media
The Power of 140 Characters
Rules of Engagement
Section I Summary
Section II Stages of a Crisis
Stage One—Fact-Finding Stage
Stage One Characteristics
Beware the ST Factor; Remember the Context
Remember the Context
Stage Two—The Unfolding Drama
Stage Two Characteristics
Stage Three—Finger-Pointing Stage = Blame Game
Stage Three Characteristics
Stage Four—Resolution and Fallout
Stage Four Characteristics
Section II Summary
Section III Spokespeople—Speed Matters
and Perception Is Everything
Who?
Golden rules
Communication style
To Chief Executive Officer or Not?
To CEO or Not?
CEO s and Social Media
Spokespeople and Social Media
Head and Heart
Role of the Frontline
Guidelines Please!
Training Please!
Summary
Policy Guidelines for Social Media
Can you Facebook at work? Policy first defense against risk
Guide—don’t stop—social media use
Section summary
Section IV Media Interviews—Rules of
Engagement in a Crisis
Understanding Journalists’ Questions
Techniques to Get Your Message Across
Bridging Technique
When You Do Not Know the Answer
Getting behind the Question
Question the Questioner
Give-and-Take in an Interview
Dealing with Difficult Questions
Q = Hypothetical
Q = Loaded
Q = Leading
Q = Either/Or
Q = Closed
Q = Multiple
Q = Guarantee
Q = Question from Hell
Handling Silence
Handling Interruptions
Never Repeat the Poison; Avoid Negative Language
How the New Media Are Changing the Rules for Interviews
Crowdsourcing
Limiting Direct Access to Mainstream Media
E-mail and Blogs
Lights, Camera, Action—The Interview
Before the Interview
Know Your Audience
Know Your Key Message
Practice Your Message
Know Your Media
Know Your Dress
During the interview
After the interview
Television interviews
Dress for the Part
Face-to-Face Interviews
Animation and Gestures
Sound Good
Speak in Stand-Alone, Whole Sentences
Phone Interviews
Radio Interviews
Print Interviews
E-mail and Twitter Interviews
Dealing with Bloggers
News Conference
Managing a News Conference
Media Training
Who Should Be Media Trained?
Stage One
Stage Two
Stage Three
Stage Four
Group or Individual Training?
How Often, How Much?
Section IV Summary
Section V Communication—Rules and Tools
Why Communicate in a Crisis?
Key questions
What to Communicate?
Standby statement
To Apologize or Not—The Role of the Apology in a Crisis
Language in a Crisis—Fall in Love with
We; No Toxic Language,
Please
Positive Language, Please!
How to Get Your Message Across
Where? New Media Tools
Overview
Web Messages: Content Brutal and to the Point
Twitter
Media Relations
Protect Your Brand
Hash Tags (#)
Facebook
Facebook Dark Groups
Facebook: The Future
Univision: An Alternative to Facebook—Useful for the U.S. Army
Video (Including YouTube)
Blogging
Blogs Are a Must-Have in Your Crisis Media Toolkit
LinkedIn
Digg
Flickr
Wikipedia
Social Media Release
Social Media Newsroom
Social Media War Room
What Tool to Choose When?
Integrate Social Media into Planning
Monitoring: Your Best Defense in a Crisis
Section V Summary
Appendix A: Guidelines for Briefing Spokespeople
Appendix B: Sample Media Contact Information Log
Appendix C: Sample News Release
Appendix D
Appendix E: Useful Resources
Appendix F: Social Media Policy Resources
Appendix G: Social Media Resources for Crisis Communicators
Appendix H: Things You Should Not Share on Social Media
Appendix I: Wordpress Statement
Appendix J: Social Media Embracing the Opportunities, Averting the Risks
Index

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