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The Fourth Star: Four Generals and the Epic Struggle for the Future of the United States Army 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
jackryan08 More than 1 year ago
The conflict in Iraqi has captivated the public for several years. There have been many accounts of the events for better or worse from the boots on the ground perspective to the policy/decision makers in Washington. This account stands in the middle with those that were & are charged with taking policy from Washington, applying Army doctrine & know how and providing assignments for the boots on the ground to accomplish. The book is part biography, part current events which gives it a duel quality of reading. The biographical portion doesn't go very deep but provides enough detail to make it worth reading and adds to the progression of the book. The majority of the book focuses on the Iraqi Conflict and the obstacles Chiarelli, Casey, Abizaid & Petraeus faced while trying to get results from vaguely defined criteria. It discusses the creative solutions that they came up to address increasingly complex problems within the confines of the narrowly focused Army Doctrine. The book presents plenty of information to allow one to develop their own opinion of the conflict but also makes a case for the reason(s) the conflict is in its current state. Like other books it provides a bibliography but the authors go further & talk specifically about the books, articles, professional journals and educational influences that each general experienced, allowing the reader to explore more than just a standard bibliography. A few of the books mention have made it to my reading list. In an effort to gain understanding of the Iraqi Conflict this book is highly recommended. It provides a unique point of view that is not the boots on the ground, nor the policy makers in Washington but in the often overlooked middle ground.
Bearcat52 More than 1 year ago
The Fourth Star follows the four generals who, in large part, are the prosecutors of the war in Iraq as they move from West Point through their careers. It is fascinating to see how their careers intertwined and how their experiences molded them. It is really much easier to determine why and how decisions were made that affect us all. This book is vital for anyone interested in current affairs!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Shiningpaw bounced on her paws, looking at her mentor. "What're we gonna do first?" she asked, her voice excited. <p> "I'll show you the territory and then we can start on hunting," Blazefur answered, swishing his fluffy golden tail. He looked out into the forest. <p> "Great! Can we go right now?" Shiningpaw followed her mentor's gaze. The trees stretched into the sky, their leaves sparkling with morning dew. Sunlight cast broken shadows and golden light across the leaves and grass littering the forest floor. A squirrel scampered across the trail to camp. <p> Blazefur looked down at Shiningpaw. "Sure. Follow me." He started at a quick pace out of camp. <p> Shiningpaw had to trot to keep up with him. Blazefur was a large cat by standard, and Shiningpaw was smaller than normal, so keeping up with her mentor was harder than it should have been. She was proud though, and didn't want to tell Blazefur to slow down. "It'll be good for my legs anyway," she figured, looking down at her white paws. <p> She followed Blazefur to a huge tree. "This," Blazefur meowed, "is the Hawk Tree. In green-leaf, hawks will nest here. Sometimes we catch them." <p> "Wow. I can't wait to learn that!" Shiningpaw said. <p> Blazefur laughed. "Let's start with something a bit easier first." <p> Violet eyes watched Shiningpaw and Blazefur from the shadows. "She's so unsuspecting," the first cat said to the other. <p> "Good. Then she'll never see us coming." The two cats disappeared into the shadows.
TNSHarris More than 1 year ago
Excellent read about some of our nation's current heroes. It also brings to attention the current military culture with an impressive emphasis on higher education. A very diverse skillset is now required for senior military leaders. Hopefully this book will inspire young officers to follow in these soldiers' footsteps.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very good read and it provides some insight to the turbulence experience by senior officers. Lacked any perspective from the NCO Corps, but neither does the title suggest it would.
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They were soldiers first !!!!!! These guys had to and have to put up with a lot of crap from the Civilan bureaucrats (pseudo-experts) and the "Don't let the facts get in the way of the good article" media.
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Artie_M More than 1 year ago
A wonderful, easy read that was instuctional on many topics. The book provided insight into the structure of the military higher command. The competiveness through the promotional process of the military.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A definite plus for anhyone who likes military historical facts and stories - gives a sense of how the 4 generals have different leadership styles, ambitions, backgrounds and how each reached general status. Excellent for a long road trip - definitely keeps your interest. Recommend highly.
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johnmorgan4 More than 1 year ago
After a reading of this book, one is compelled to ask, "Why are we trying to build a democratic and lasting government in countries based on the shifting sands of tribal loyalties and interests? Generals like Abizaid and Petraeus although brilliant academicians, soldiers, and strategists attempted/ are attempting to do the impossible for the unwilling and, even more probably, the incapable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago