The Generalissimo's Son: Chiang Ching-kuo and the Revolutions in China and Taiwan

The Generalissimo's Son: Chiang Ching-kuo and the Revolutions in China and Taiwan

by Jay Taylor

Hardcover

$80.00
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780674002876
Publisher: Harvard
Publication date: 10/15/2000
Pages: 544
Product dimensions: 6.50(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.40(d)

About the Author

Jay Taylor is a Research Associate at The Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University.

Table of Contents

  • Notes on Romanization of Chinese Names
  • Abbreviations

  • Part One: Revolution

  1. Upright Stone
  2. A Teachable Son
  3. Dreams of the Red Chamber
  4. Socialist Man
  5. Reunion and War
  6. The Kannan Model
  7. Dean and General
  8. Manchurian Candidate
  9. Defeat
  10. End Game


  • Part Two: The Island

  1. An Unintended Consequence
  2. Secret Wars
  3. Family, Friends, Enemies
  4. Managing the Great Patron
  5. China Leaps Backward
  6. The Minister
  7. The Golden Cudgel
  8. The Premier
  9. Old Orders Passing
  10. The Divorce
  11. Riot and Trials
  12. Island and Mainland
  13. Successors, Brokers, Killers
  14. Building Consensus
  15. Breakthrough
  16. A Chinese Democracy


  • Epilogue
  • Appendix: Romanization Table
  • Notes
  • India

What People are Saying About This

Taylor tells the story of Chiang Ching-kuo's life well. The writing is clear and the relationship between Ching-kuo's family and career to the dramatic 'sweep' of the century is maintained throughout. A consistent effort is made--rather successfully--to contrast Ching-kuo's experience with that of his old Moscow classmate, Deng Xiaoping. Taylor offers a significant reinterpretation of Ching-kuo's time in the USSR, leading one to conclude that he may really have meant it in all of those Stalinistically stylized denunciations of his father, or at least in some of them. More important, Taylor makes it clear, even in an understated way, that the time in the USSR was formative, politically, for his subject.

William C. Kirby

Taylor tells the story of Chiang Ching-kuo's life well. The writing is clear and the relationship between Ching-kuo's family and career to the dramatic 'sweep' of the century is maintained throughout. A consistent effort is made--rather successfully--to contrast Ching-kuo's experience with that of his old Moscow classmate, Deng Xiaoping. Taylor offers a significant reinterpretation of Ching-kuo's time in the USSR, leading one to conclude that he may really have meant it in all of those Stalinistically stylized denunciations of his father, or at least in some of them. More important, Taylor makes it clear, even in an understated way, that the time in the USSR was formative, politically, for his subject.
William C. Kirby, Harvard University

Andrew J. Nathan

A readable, and fascinating book--a breakthrough in information available in English about an important and relatively little-known historical character, about U. S.-Taiwan relations from the 1950s through the 1980s, and about political dictatorship and reform in Taiwan. The book paints a large canvas. It gives attention to the man, his family life, and his immediate relationships, but also to the general political setting. The writing is direct and clear. Taylor is good at reimagining circumstances, sometimes because he's visited the scenes and met the people. With his voracious appetite for sources and reliance on interviews, he can often bring a scene to life. Taylor is shrewd and honest at the level of particular incidents and issues, and he writes in a voice of tolerant disillusionment about human folly in general. He creates a plausible, humanly complex sense of the thinking and motivation of characters.
Andrew J. Nathan, author of China's Transition

Ralph N. Clough

A well-written account of an extraordinary life, narrated against the background of the world-shaking events in which Chiang Ching-kuo was deeply involved: the Soviet Revolution, the Sino-Japanese war, the civil war between the Nationalists and the Communists in China, and the Cold War. Taylor's book fills a glaring gap in the literature; it will be valued by scholars and by others interested in the character and role of a memorable individual in the making of today's Taiwan. In writing this full-length biography, Taylor has interviewed scores of people who knew Ching-kuo well at various stages of his life. He traveled to his hometown, Hsikou, and to the area that he administered in southern Kiangsi to interview people in both places about Ching-kuo's early life. He has also located documents and interviewed individuals who cast light on Ching-kuo's experience in the Soviet Union. It will be a distinguished addition to Harvard's publications on China.
Ralph N. Clough, Johns Hopkins University

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