The Girl Who Spun Gold

The Girl Who Spun Gold

Paperback

$17.95

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780590473781
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date: 09/01/2000
Pages: 40
Product dimensions: 9.92(w) x 12.30(h) x 0.17(d)
Lexile: AD620L (what's this?)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

The books of Virginia Hamilton (1934-2002), which combined African-American and Native-American lore with contemporary stories and characters, are memorable not only for their inventiveness and rich characterizations, but also for their ability to evoke a wide variety of times, places, and historical figures. She wrote and published more than 40 books — including Zeely, The People Could Fly, and Cousins — and won every major award in youth literature.

Date of Birth:

March 12, 1936

Date of Death:

February 19, 2002

Place of Birth:

Yellow Springs, Ohio

Place of Death:

Yellow Springs, Ohio

Education:

Attended Antioch College, Ohio State University, and the New School for Social Research

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The Girl Who Spun Gold 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
McKennaMiller on LibraryThing 10 months ago
The illustrations are what make this book amazing. I prefer the german version of Rumplestiltskin because I think the characters are more developed. For instance, the way that the main woman character finds out the little man's name in the original tale is much more creative than in the this one. I also found the writing style very bland. However, I do appreciate how the author changed the dialogue into traditional west indies lingo.
jgbyers on LibraryThing 10 months ago
This is a story of a beautiful young lady named Quashiba. Quashiba spends the her time spinning the thread. One day while she was spinning thread she got a visit from the king. Quashiba's mother then takes this opportunity to tell a lie that Quashiba "is spinning a whole field of finest golden thread to make cloth for his Highest." Quashiba is in trouble when the King believes this lie and decides to marry her so she will spin the finest thread. This story is a fun spinoff of the original Rumpelstiltskin.
elizabethholloway on LibraryThing 10 months ago
This story is the West Indian version of Rumpelstiltskin. Here, the mother makes the bold lie that her daughter can spin straw into gold, the king marries here right away, but a year later locks her in a room to spin gold. Lit'mahn appears, agrees to help her, and plans to marry her himself if he can't guess his name.the West Indian dialect has a melodic cadence that children may enjoy. it's not as straightforward as some other retellings but it is appealing to the ear. The illustrations, though, while beautiful, may not appeal to children. The characters seem distant and their emotions are hard to read. The illustrations of Lit'mahn though are dramatic and creepy. This book would be appropriate for ages 6 to 8.
eevers on LibraryThing 10 months ago
This is an alternate to the classic Rumplestilkin story, but set in Africa. The illustrations are beautiful! The gold catches your eye on every page!
amspicer on LibraryThing 10 months ago
This is a story of a beautiful young lady named Quashiba. Quashiba spends the majority of her time spinning the plainest of thread. One day when she is spinning the thread the king comes riding up to her. Quashiba's mother then takes this opportunity to tell a lie that Quashiba "is spinning a whole field of finest golden thread to make cloth for his Highest." Quashiba finds herself stuck as the kind decides to marry her and expects her to makes three whole rooms full of golden things. What will she do?! This story is a fun spinoff of the original Rumpelstiltskin which was one of my favorites growing up!! I think all ages can enjoy this book.
kzrobin on LibraryThing 10 months ago
This would be a great book to read to a K-3 grade class. Although first you might want to read to them Rumpelstilskin, and allow them to compare the two.
grisaille More than 1 year ago
This is a beautiful retelling of a classic fairy tale. The artwork is stunning, and I love the sing-song Caribbean-influenced dialect. Highly recommended for fairy tale fans.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book shows that any and every nation can have a varied version of the same fairy tale, fable or legend, yet add to it.